Political State – Milwaukee County First http://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 21:23:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-7-1.png Political State – Milwaukee County First http://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/ 32 32 Texas Senate approves congressional map that draws no new black or Hispanic districts, even though people of color fueled growth https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/texas-senate-approves-congressional-map-that-draws-no-new-black-or-hispanic-districts-even-though-people-of-color-fueled-growth/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/texas-senate-approves-congressional-map-that-draws-no-new-black-or-hispanic-districts-even-though-people-of-color-fueled-growth/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 21:03:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/texas-senate-approves-congressional-map-that-draws-no-new-black-or-hispanic-districts-even-though-people-of-color-fueled-growth/ The Texas Senate on Friday approved a card that would largely protect Congressional incumbents, while reducing the number of districts in which black and Hispanic residents make up the majority of eligible voters – hampering growth in Democratic Party representation from state in Washington, DC The Congress map focuses more on protecting incumbents than increasing […]]]>

The Texas Senate on Friday approved a card that would largely protect Congressional incumbents, while reducing the number of districts in which black and Hispanic residents make up the majority of eligible voters – hampering growth in Democratic Party representation from state in Washington, DC

The Congress map focuses more on protecting incumbents than increasing the power of the dominant Republican Party in the state by turning districts from red to blue. But the map, proposed by GOP State Senator Joan Huffman of Houston, helps Republicans by increasing the number of districts that would have voted for Donald Trump in the 2020 presidential election and by decreasing those that would have been for Joe Biden.

The map also hampers the ability for Democrats to bridge the gap between the two parties in the Texas Congressional delegation by drawing fewer districts in which voters of color make up the majority of eligible voters, who tend to lean for them. Democrats in the state. The state’s current delegation consists of 23 Republicans and 13 Democrats.

Currently, based on the eligible electoral population, the state has 22 districts with a white majority, eight with a majority Hispanic, one with a majority black, and five without a majority.

But although the state’s population growth allowed the state to receive two more seats in Congress over the next decade, state lawmakers have not drawn any new seats where voters of color form the backbone. majority of eligible voters.

Even then, people of color have led 95% of the state’s population over the past decade, with Hispanics making up nearly 2 million of the state’s additional 4 million.

Responding to criticism that lawmakers had not reflected this growth, Huffman said that although she drew the map “regardless of race, it is wrong to say that race has been totally ignored.”

She said she passed her drafts of the map through the attorney general’s office, which carried out further analysis to ensure the state was complying with the voting rights law, which protects citizens. voters of color against discrimination, and the US Constitution. But she declined Democrats’ requests to explain the analyzes state attorneys performed on the map.

Democrats argue that their analysis of U.S. census data supports the creation of more districts where voters of color made up the majority, especially Hispanics.

“We were assured that all existing minority opportunity neighborhoods, whether black or Latino, would function as such,” Huffman said. “And we haven’t seen any solid basis that a new minority opportunity district should be drawn on the new maps.”

Senator Roland Gutierrez, D-San Antonio, proposed a map that would create three additional districts where Hispanics made up the majority, bringing the number of those districts to 10.

But Republicans rejected the proposal, with Huffman saying the amendment was drafted less than 24 hours before the Senate vote on the maps and would result in a “detailed and thorough racial gerrymander” in North Texas to sketch a new district in. Hispanic majority in the same region. as the current Congressional District 33, represented by U.S. Representative Marc Veasey, D-Fort Worth.

Gutierrez accused Republicans of racial discrimination against voters of color.

“How else to describe a situation where Texas gains new political power due to the physical presence of millions of black, brown and Asian bodies, and yet the political establishment does not give these same Texans the opportunity to elect more than candidates to represent them? ” he said in a statement. “It is an insult to the foundations of our democracy. “

Depending on the maps on offer, voters of color could end up with less representation in their delegation to Congress. The new map drops the number of districts in which Hispanics make up a majority of eligible voters from eight to seven, and districts in which black Texans make up a majority of eligible voters from one to zero.

The number of districts where whites make up the majority of eligible voters increases to 23, even as the state’s white population – which only increased by 187,252 – has been overwhelmed by the growth of people of color.

Democrats urged the Senate to change the proposed cards because they would otherwise attract incumbents like Houston Democrats Sheila Jackson Lee and Al Green to the same district. Lee, which represents the 18th Congressional District which covers part of downtown Houston and some of the city’s historically black neighborhoods, is drawn from his district and loops into Green’s 9th Congressional District.

Both lawmakers testified before the Senate Redistribution Committee to oppose the redistribution of their districts. Lee said his district had been redesigned “in a surgical, flawed and unconstitutional manner.”

Green noted that the congressional delegation had only five black members, and two of them were drawn to the same district.

But lawmakers couldn’t agree on how to redraw the maps to minimize the impact on Lee and Green District.

This is the first round of political mapping in Texas since the United States Supreme Court overturned provisions to protect voters of color from discrimination. Previously, states with a long history of electoral discrimination, such as Texas, had to receive federal approval before making changes to election laws or political maps.

But the Supreme Court essentially removed that requirement in 2013, leaving no buffer for voters of color if lawmakers passed discriminatory cards.

Since the enactment of the Voting Rights Act in 1965, Texas has not gone through a decade without a federal court reprimanding it for violating federal protections for voters of color.

Civil rights groups like the NAACP and the League of United Latin American Citizens have told lawmakers the Senate proposal dilutes the voting power of black and Hispanic voters in the state.

Dallas-based LULAC president Domingo Garcia told a Senate committee hearing that if the maps did not change to reflect the growth of Hispanics in the state, his organization would likely sue the state.

The congressional card is now traveling to the Texas home for approval before it can be signed by Governor Greg Abbott. The card could potentially see changes and must be approved before the end of the special legislative session which ends on October 19.

Carla Astudillo contributed to this report.

From the Texas Tribune


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In the race for District Four City Council, a political newcomer and a former state official go head-to-head https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/in-the-race-for-district-four-city-council-a-political-newcomer-and-a-former-state-official-go-head-to-head/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/in-the-race-for-district-four-city-council-a-political-newcomer-and-a-former-state-official-go-head-to-head/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 10:01:04 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/in-the-race-for-district-four-city-council-a-political-newcomer-and-a-former-state-official-go-head-to-head/ The winner will need to help address some of the biggest challenges facing the district, which mainly includes Dorchester and Mattapan, as well as small slices of the Jamaican Plain and Roslindale – rising rents, violence and racial inequality exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic. “Do we want someone with experience, or a newcomer with a […]]]>

The winner will need to help address some of the biggest challenges facing the district, which mainly includes Dorchester and Mattapan, as well as small slices of the Jamaican Plain and Roslindale – rising rents, violence and racial inequality exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic.

“Do we want someone with experience, or a newcomer with a way of thinking outside the box? said Rachel Idowu, a resident of Mattapan who worked in the town’s legal department for 20 years.

The residents of the neighborhood are predominantly black and Latino, and about a third were born abroad. Electoral participation in preliminary elections was slightly lower than the disappointing overall city-wide participation; about 23 percent of the district’s 46,000 voters voted.

District Four candidate Evandro Carvalho addressed volunteers at a campaign rally at restaurant Cesaria in September. He was standing with his eldest daughter, Eliana, 6, and his wife, Ashley. John Tlumacki / Globe Staff

Carvalho, a progressive Democrat who emigrated from Cape Verde at age 15, has done well in the progressivism bracket of District Four Jamaica Plain, and in the Bowdoin-Geneva district, is home to a large Cape Verdean community.

Worrell, small business owner whose parents emigrated from Jamaica and Barbados, and who has strong roots in the Caribbean diaspora of the district, received much of its support from the Ashmont, Codman Square and Mattapan Heights neighborhoods.

Brian Worrell, followed by campaign aide Chet Brown, knocked on Dorchester's doors.
Brian Worrell, followed by campaign aide Chet Brown, knocked on Dorchester’s doors.Barry Chin / Globe Staff

Despite his own family’s immigration history, Worrell promoted himself in his campaign media as a native of Dorchester and “the only permanent resident of Boston to run”. In an interview, Worrell said his deep roots in District Four make him better equipped to tackle issues in the area.

“It’s about knowing the people, it’s about knowing the problems and experiencing those problems,” Worrell said. “My whole family has been through these real problems since the 1960s.”

Carvalho highlights his long history of government service – and 20 years in the district.

“I have served this community no matter where I lived,” he said.

Carvalho is a graduate of Madison Park Vocational Technical High School and graduated from the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Howard University School of Law. He is now the executive director of the city’s Human Rights Commission, an agency that helps tackle the inequalities faced by marginalized communities in Boston.

“Right now we have a new mayor, we are going to have five or six new city councilors, and we have a lot of momentum in the city,” Carvalho said. “We need people who have experience on the board to get things done. “

Worrell grew up on Fuller Street in Dorchester, with a large extended family; he attended Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School as a METCO student and graduated from Northeastern University. Now he owns Greater Investments Real Estate in Dorchester.

In his work as a real estate broker, Worrell said, he has helped families build generational wealth; he also helped organize vaccination clinics, food deliveries and other community services, especially during the pandemic.

“Our campaign isn’t just about ‘I have experience’ ideas,” Worrell said. “It’s, ‘I’ve got the action.’ “

The candidates have a few political differences: Carvalho supports rent control; Worrell opposes it and supports instead offered 100 percent affordable housing units on vacant lots in District Four. Carvalho said he would work to increase the percentage of affordable housing across the city to at least 20 percent.

Worrell supports hybrid body of appointed and elected school committees members, while Carvalho prefers a fully elected school committee. The two candidates want the city to expand school curricula, introduce vocational and technical skills in younger children, and inject more money into after-school and youth employment programs.

After a “Recharge Rally” campaign at the Cesaria de Bowdoin restaurant on a recent Saturday, Carvalho knocked on doors along Olney Street waving to voters Portuguese, Cape Verdean Creole, English and limited Spanish.

A resident shared the trauma she and her 8-year-old daughter have struggled with since the April gunshot death of her grandmother. Fourteen bullet holes from this tragedy pierced the gray exterior of the house.

She said no one in town has been registered since the death of his grandmother. Due to the frequent violence on her street, she said, she “has the cops in her. [smartphone] favorites. “

Carvalho took her number and said he would contact city employees to contact her, he said.

“I promise you that I will be there to support you,” Carvalho said. “You can put me in your favorites. “

Although both candidates agree the city needs police reform that tackles violence in their district without over-policing communities, Worrell, who has relatives at the police department, has been approved by the Boston Police Patrol Association. This could be a mixed blessing in the post-George Floyd era, and in a town where the police union was rocked by scandal.

Carvalho says the union’s approval is telling: Although he served as Suffolk’s deputy prosecutor, prosecuting gun crimes, assaults and drug distribution, he also pushed for progressive criminal justice reforms as a legislator, including repealing mandatory minimum sentences and raising the age at which minors can be tried.

District Four candidate Evandro Carvalho addressed volunteers at a campaign rally at restaurant Cesaria in September.
District Four candidate Evandro Carvalho addressed volunteers at a campaign rally at restaurant Cesaria in September.John Tlumacki / Globe Staff

In the race for advice, Carvalho has proposed updating the Boston Police Patrolmen’s Association contracts so that the Office of Police Accountability and Transparency and the Civil Review Board have more power to hold officers to account.

“The choice is very clear,” he said. “Who is for reform, or who is for the status quo?” “

Worrell said he is also engaged in police reform that takes into account the different issues affecting various neighborhoods in the district, and he has established relationships with groups such as the Massachusetts Association of Minority Law Enforcement Officers.

Brian Worrell spoke to Shirieny Pinnock during a canvassing.
Brian Worrell spoke to Shirieny Pinnock during a canvassing.Barry Chin / Globe Staff

“I understand the importance of having open communication and dialogue with our police department to ensure that all areas of our community are protected,” said Worrell. He supports community policing models, such as a neighborhood task force that would bring together community stakeholders to fight crime.

On a frosty Thursday night recently, Worrell knocked on doors about Reverend Loesch Family Park. Introducing himself as a ‘child of Dorchester’, he stressed the importance of voting and explained how he would use his real estate experience to bring affordable housing to the area.

Tinaja Pearson, from Dorchester, told Worrell her landlord was trying to evict her family because they couldn’t pay the rent. Her 10-day-old son, with her in a stroller, was her sixth child.

Brian Worrell spoke with Tinaja Pearson.
Brian Worrell spoke with Tinaja Pearson.Barry Chin / Globe Staff

“Even if the hospitals help. . . with housing, they don’t have too many resources to help us, ”said Pearson, noting that the RAFT program, which provides emergency rent relief during the pandemic, “takes way too long, and that leaves us in Section 8 out of the way.”

“I know a lot of people in [the real estate network]Worrell said, handing him his business card. “Let’s connect and see if I can connect you to more resources.”


Tiana Woodard is a member of the Report for America corps covering black neighborhoods. She can be reached at tiana.woodard@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter at @tianarochon.



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judge orders Kentucky Democratic mainstay jail | New policies https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/judge-orders-kentucky-democratic-mainstay-jail-new-policies/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/judge-orders-kentucky-democratic-mainstay-jail-new-policies/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 21:40:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/judge-orders-kentucky-democratic-mainstay-jail-new-policies/ LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP) – A former president of the Kentucky Democratic Party is due to appear in jail next month on campaign finance charges, a federal judge has said. U.S. District Judge Gregory F. Van Tatenhove ordered Jerry Lundergan to go to jail on November 30 after the 6th Circuit appeals court upheld the 74-year-old’s […]]]>

LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP) – A former president of the Kentucky Democratic Party is due to appear in jail next month on campaign finance charges, a federal judge has said.

U.S. District Judge Gregory F. Van Tatenhove ordered Jerry Lundergan to go to jail on November 30 after the 6th Circuit appeals court upheld the 74-year-old’s conviction and dismissed a stay motion of the judgment, the Lexington Herald-Leader reported on Wednesday. . He was allowed to remain free while appealing.

A jury convicted Lundergan and political consultant Dale Emmons in September 2019 for conspiring to illegally contribute more than $ 200,000 from one of Lundergan’s companies to his daughter’s 2014 campaign in the US Senate. Alison Lundergan Grimes, Kentucky’s secretary of state from 2012 to 2020, lost the race to Republican Senator Mitch McConnell.

Van Tatenhove sentenced Lundergan in July 2020 to 21 months in prison and a fine of $ 150,000.

Businessman and former state attorney J. Guthrie True told the Herald-Leader his client will report to jail next month but will also continue his appeal to the US Supreme Court. United.

Political cartoons

Court document shows that if the High Court accepts his case, Lundergan will argue that the application of the corporate communications ban against him violated his First Amendment rights because he contributed to a member of his close family.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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Political newcomer challenges government official | Local News https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/political-newcomer-challenges-government-official-local-news/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/political-newcomer-challenges-government-official-local-news/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/political-newcomer-challenges-government-official-local-news/ After years in the classroom and a long-standing interest in politics, Katy Cecil decided it was time to dip her feet in the political arena. The Hodgenville resident and LaRue County High School teacher recently announced her candidacy to run as a Democrat for the state representative for the 24th District, which serves LaRue, Green […]]]>

After years in the classroom and a long-standing interest in politics, Katy Cecil decided it was time to dip her feet in the political arena.

The Hodgenville resident and LaRue County High School teacher recently announced her candidacy to run as a Democrat for the state representative for the 24th District, which serves LaRue, Green and Marion counties.

Cecil said she decided to run for the seat, currently held by Representative Brandon Reed of Hodgenville, because she cared about people and believed they deserved better.

“I’ve always been aware of political issues,” Cecil said. “I am the policy. I take politics very seriously. I take the government very seriously. Just like teaching, it is something that requires a lot of thought and compassion and taking care of one’s neighbor. I think we need more lawmakers who have this attitude.

As a teacher, part of her platform is focused on education and teachers.

“It’s so frustrating for a lot of us not to have a say in government,” she said. “They don’t seem to care about the difficulties some of us face. We have been naughty.

Cecil, 52, who held other jobs before graduating in 2000 to become a teacher, said she found true passion in the career and wanted lawmakers who would fight for teachers’ rights, this which she says hasn’t been the case lately. years.

“I don’t like to be lied to,” she said. “This has happened to me more times than I want to admit under some of our current (legislative) leaders.”

Referring to what has come to be known as the “Sewer Bill,” where lawmakers attached an amendment to Senate Bill 151 in the closing days of the 2018 session, Cecil called the move in the middle of the night of “incredible slap in the face”. The bill originally dealt with regulating the sewage system, but the amendment proposed changes to the Kentucky teacher pension system.

“We were promised that these things would not be voted on or for,” she said. “Then it happened and it was terrible.”

Cecil also raised concerns about the recent special session and votes on mask mandates for schools and other education laws related to the pandemic.

“They were asked to come to Frankfurt for a very specific purpose and they came with their own agenda,” she said. “We are in the middle of a pandemic and you want to make it harder for us to do our job and you want to make it easier for us to get sick. … It’s discouraging.

Cecil insists that she is not a candidate for a problem.

“I have very passionate opinions on a lot of things,” she said. “That’s what I would say about myself, I care about everyone. I think all people deserve to have a government that works for them to help them improve their lives, to help eliminate the obstacles and uplift people.

She believes that many issues of interest to the majority of Kentuckians, including the legalization of marijuana and the expansion of casino games, go unnoticed due to special political interests.

“There are a lot of things our legislature is trying to do that is not the best for the people of our state and I want to do things to help people,” she said.

Politicians should tackle issues that could help people, such as the failure of the unemployment system and the increase in the minimum wage, Cecil said.

“These are things that would have an immediate impact on the lives of our citizens, and we are not doing it,” she said. “We don’t even talk about it. “

Cecil, who has lived in Hodgenville for most of his life, is married with two daughters.

“I just want to work for people,” she said. “I think the biggest message is that I care and I really do. Anyone who knows me knows that this is 100% sincere and that I care about everyone, even those who disagree with me. I want to make their whole life better.

Gina Clear can be contacted at 270-505-1418 or gclear@thenewsenterprise.com.


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Gianforte appoints members of Enlarged Fish and Wildlife Commission | 406 Politics https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/gianforte-appoints-members-of-enlarged-fish-and-wildlife-commission-406-politics/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/gianforte-appoints-members-of-enlarged-fish-and-wildlife-commission-406-politics/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 20:16:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/gianforte-appoints-members-of-enlarged-fish-and-wildlife-commission-406-politics/ Jana Waller Courtesy photo “It is truly an honor to accept this appointment from Governor Gianforte,” Waller said in an email. “I understand the complexity and importance of wildlife management and look forward to representing Region 2 and Montana as a whole. I am very passionate about the wildlife, habitat and traditions of Montana and […]]]>





Jana Waller


Courtesy photo


“It is truly an honor to accept this appointment from Governor Gianforte,” Waller said in an email. “I understand the complexity and importance of wildlife management and look forward to representing Region 2 and Montana as a whole. I am very passionate about the wildlife, habitat and traditions of Montana and will listen to all aspects of issues to make informed decisions for the herds, herds and people of Montana.

Waller’s term of office runs until January 1, 2023.

Lane owns and operates Crescent Cross Ranch, a family business specializing in Black Angus cattle. He said in an interview that he believes he can bring the multi-faceted perspective of a landowner, athlete and former outfitter to the commission.

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“The most important thing is that I felt disconnected when it comes to the possibility of having our region represented,” he said of his interest in serving on the committee. “Not that they did a bad job, but it’s very different in southeast Montana than in western Montana, and I thought I could hopefully do a good job. sense and listen to all the different parts before making my decision. “

Lane sees the heightened emotions around many of the commission’s decisions, saying he wants to make the best-informed decisions that, while not always popular, mean the most to the majority of people.


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Texas Senate approves map cementing GOP dominance in upper house https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/texas-senate-approves-map-cementing-gop-dominance-in-upper-house/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/texas-senate-approves-map-cementing-gop-dominance-in-upper-house/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 02:17:52 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/texas-senate-approves-map-cementing-gop-dominance-in-upper-house/ Sign up for The Brief, our daily newsletter that keeps readers up to date with Texas’ most essential news. The Texas Senate has approved a new political map for its own members that would consolidate Republican dominance in the chamber for the next 10 years, even though Democrats argued that the changes do not reflect […]]]>


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Democrats rely on megabucks political scam bill https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/democrats-rely-on-megabucks-political-scam-bill/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/democrats-rely-on-megabucks-political-scam-bill/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 04:09:52 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/democrats-rely-on-megabucks-political-scam-bill/ Democrats are pushing for a multi-billion dollar spending bill called the Build Back Better Act. It should be called the Political Scam Bill. Buried within the 2,465 pages are numerous billion-dollar grants to unnamed community organizations for vague purposes such as promoting “community engagement” and “creating equitable civic infrastructure.” Translation: Your taxpayer’s money will fund […]]]>

Democrats are pushing for a multi-billion dollar spending bill called the Build Back Better Act. It should be called the Political Scam Bill.

Buried within the 2,465 pages are numerous billion-dollar grants to unnamed community organizations for vague purposes such as promoting “community engagement” and “creating equitable civic infrastructure.”

Translation: Your taxpayer’s money will fund the payroll of leftist advocacy groups between elections. In return, they become the field army by equipping telephone banks, collecting ballots and escorting people to the polls on election day.

The Build Back Better bill injects tens of billions of dollars – an unprecedented amount – into community organizations. This is because the stakes are high. Democrats in Congress failed to pass the two bills that would change the electoral rules in favor of their party: HR 1 and HR 4. Build Back Better is the party’s best way to gain electoral advantage .

The bill not only funds community nonprofits, but also adds to their influence by allowing them to distribute billions of dollars in seed money to local startups.

In a new twist, the Small Business Administration is handing out huge sums to nonprofits that will serve as “incubators”, disbursing funds to start-ups in “underserved” areas. Oddly enough, the SBA has regional offices across the United States to help startups and could distribute the funds itself. But instead, it empowers nonprofits by making them intermediaries.

Ninety percent of startups fail. There is no more risky place to put taxpayer money. Yet the bill does not set any standard for which businesses obtain funding, except that they must be majority owned by members of “under-represented communities,” including residents of high poverty areas and elders. incarcerated. One thing they can’t have is a track record. If they have been in business for five years, they are not eligible.

From an economic point of view, it is taxpayers’ money in a ditch. Obviously, the goal is political. It is the purchase of votes.

Overall, nonprofits are eligible for up to $ 90 billion to support their own activities or broadcast to friends under this bill. This is the equivalent of the entire 2020 budget for the state of Florida.

Historically, the political machines that distributed benefits in exchange for votes were local, as in Boston, New York, and Kansas City in the 19th century. “All there is to do,” Kansas City political boss James Pendergast explained, is “do things for people and then later they will do things for you.”

Barack Obama, the community organizer turned president, was a past master in machine politics. The Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) outsourced the important health plan registration work to community organizations, funding them generously and letting them register people to vote at the same time. Obamacare turned community organizations into a fifth domain with government funding but no government rules.

Now, Build Back Better finances an even wider range of organizations. It allocates a whopping $ 5.7 billion “for community-led projects to stabilize neighborhoods.” Translation: rallies and legal action to stop gentrification and “displacement”.

There is also $ 5 billion in global climate justice grants to pay community organizations for, among other things, “facilitating the engagement of disadvantaged communities in state and federal processes.” Translation: organize protests and claim seats on zoning boards.

Hundreds of millions of dollars are targeting the higher death rates of black women giving birth, but even on such a serious issue, the bill requires community organizations to take priority over licensed medical centers, teaching hospitals, and nursing homes. nursing schools. Politics first.

For every left-wing community organization, there is a grant in Build Back Better. The causes range from the growth and diversification of the Doula workforce to anti-discrimination and prejudice training.

Republicans laughed at Obama’s professional experience as a community organizer. But if Build Back Better passes, Democrats will have the final say, pumping big money into left-wing community organizations to tip the scales against a fair two-party system.


Betsy McCaughey is a former Lieutenant Governor of New York and author of “The Next Pandemic”.


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China strengthens political control of internet giants https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/china-strengthens-political-control-of-internet-giants/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/china-strengthens-political-control-of-internet-giants/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 10:34:15 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/china-strengthens-political-control-of-internet-giants/ Chinese President Xi Jinping, center, walks past a guard of honor during a visit to the Monument to the People’s Heroes during a ceremony to mark Martyrs’ Day in Tiananmen Square in Beijing on Thursday, September 30, 2021. Xi paid tribute at a solemn commemoration for those who died in the struggle to establish the […]]]>

Chinese President Xi Jinping, center, walks past a guard of honor during a visit to the Monument to the People's Heroes during a ceremony to mark Martyrs' Day in Tiananmen Square in Beijing on Thursday, September 30, 2021. Xi paid tribute at a solemn commemoration for those who died in the struggle to establish the Communist Party government, as he leads a nationwide campaign to strengthen one-party patriotism and authority.  (AP Photo / Andy Wong)

Chinese President Xi Jinping, center, walks past a guard of honor during a visit to the Monument to the People’s Heroes during a ceremony to mark Martyrs’ Day in Tiananmen Square in Beijing on Thursday, September 30, 2021. Xi paid tribute at a solemn commemoration for those who died in the struggle to establish the Communist Party government, as he leads a nationwide campaign to strengthen one-party patriotism and authority. (AP Photo / Andy Wong)

PA

The ruling Communist Party is strengthening political control over China’s internet giants and exploiting their wealth to pay for its ambitions to reduce reliance on American and European technology.

Anti-monopoly and data security measures that began in late 2020 have rocked the industry, which thrived for two decades with little regulation. Investor nervousness has reduced the total market value of e-commerce platform Alibaba, gaming and social media operator Tencent, and other tech giants by more than $ 1.3 trillion.

The party says the fight against monopolies will be a priority until 2025. It says competition will help create jobs and raise living standards.

President Xi Jinping’s government seems likely to stay the course even if economic growth suffers, say businessmen, lawyers and economists. “These companies are global leaders in their innovation sectors, yet the leadership is ready to crush them all,” said Mark Williams, chief economist for Asia at Capital Economics.

The crackdown reflects Xi’s public focus on reviving the party’s “original mission” to lead economic and social development, said Steve Tsang, a Chinese policy scholar at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London. He said it could also help Xi politically if, as expected, he runs for a third five-year term as party leader.

Chinese leaders do not want to re-impose direct control of the economy but want private sector companies to align with the ruling party’s plans, said Lester Ross, Beijing bureau chief at law firm WilmerHale.

“What worries them are the companies getting too big and too independent from the party,” Ross said.

Chinese internet companies and their billionaire founders, including Jack Ma of Alibaba Group and Pony Ma of Tencent Holdings, are among the biggest global success stories of the past two decades. Alibaba is the largest e-commerce company, while Tencent operates the popular WeChat messaging service.

But party plans focus on robots, chips, and other hardware, so these companies are rushing to show their loyalty by pumping billions of dollars into them.

The ruling party’s campaign is prompting warnings that the world could decouple or divide into separate markets with incompatible technology. Products from China would not work in the United States or Europe, and vice versa. Innovation and efficiency would suffer.

US restrictions on Chinese access to telecommunications and other technologies have not helped.

Alibaba has announced that it will invest $ 28 billion to develop operating system software, processor chips and network technology. The company has pledged $ 1 billion to support 100,000 developers and tech startups over the next three years.

Last year, Tencent pledged to invest $ 70 billion in digital infrastructure. Meituan, an e-commerce, delivery and services platform, has raised $ 10 billion to develop autonomous vehicles and robots.

Chinese officials recognize that the campaign comes at an economic cost but are unwilling to speak out, Tsang said. “Who is going to stand up and tell Xi Jinping, your policies are going to hurt China?”

Investors, many of whom are burned by the decline in tech stocks, are keeping their money on the sidelines. Tencent’s market cap of $ 575 billion is down $ 350 billion from its February high, a drop equal to more than the total value of Nike Inc. or Pfizer Inc.

CEO Masayoshi Son of Japan’s Softbank Group – one of Alibaba’s earliest investors – said on Aug. 11 that he would postpone the new deals with China. Softbank has invested $ 11 billion in ride-sharing service Didi Global, whose share price has fallen by a third since its U.S. stock market debut on July 30.

The crackdown began in November when Beijing ordered Ant Group, part of Alibaba’s online payment service Alipay, to postpone its stock exchange debuts in Hong Kong and Shanghai. The company, which offers online savings and investing services, has been urged to scale back its plans and install bank-like systems to control borrowers and manage loan risks. Industry analysts have lowered forecasts of Ant’s expected market value.

Meanwhile, Xi’s government is tightening control over data collected by private companies over the public, especially Alibaba and Tencent, which have hundreds of millions of users. Chinese leaders see information about its 1.4 billion people as a tool for better understanding the public and the economy – and a potential security risk in private hands.

A law that goes into effect Nov. 1 sets security standards, prohibits companies from disclosing information without customer permission, and tells them to limit the amount they collect. Unlike data protection laws in Western countries, Chinese rules say nothing about limiting government or ruling party access to personal information.

Beijing is also accused of using its public data store in a crackdown on Uyghurs and other predominantly Muslim minorities in China’s northwest Xinjiang region.

“Very lax” until a few months ago, China has become “one of the most active and energetic jurisdictions in regulating the digital economy,” wrote Angela Zhang, anti-monopoly expert at the Law School of the University of Hong Kong, in an article. this month.

In April, Alibaba was fined 18.3 billion yuan ($ 2.8 billion) for offenses that included banning vendors who wanted to use its platforms from doing business with Alibaba’s competitors.

Units of Alibaba, Tencent, live streaming site Kuaishou, microblogging platform Sina Weibo, and social media site Xiaohongshu were also fined for distributing sexually suggestive stickers or short videos of sex. ‘children. Tencent’s music department has been ordered to end exclusivity contracts with suppliers.

Beijing is also using the crackdown to narrow China’s politically sensitive wealth gap by pushing tech giants to share their wealth with employees and consumers.

Didi, Meituan and other delivery and ride-sharing companies were ordered in May to reduce the fees charged to drivers and improve their benefits and safety. Meituan CEO Wang Xing has pledged to donate $ 2.3 billion to environmental and social initiatives. Tencent’s Ma pledged $ 2 billion to charity.

Alibaba has pledged to spend 100 billion yuan ($ 15.5 billion) on job creation, rural development and other initiatives to support Xi’s “common prosperity” campaign.

Such income redistribution plans “are reminiscent of mass mobilization and populist strategies” of the 1950s and 1960s under then-leader Mao Zedong, Zhang wrote.


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Political power, health and future of Latin Americans in Pennsylvania discussed at statewide convention https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/political-power-health-and-future-of-latin-americans-in-pennsylvania-discussed-at-statewide-convention/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/political-power-health-and-future-of-latin-americans-in-pennsylvania-discussed-at-statewide-convention/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 17:00:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/political-power-health-and-future-of-latin-americans-in-pennsylvania-discussed-at-statewide-convention/ As political lines are literally redrawn and vaccination efforts provide a possible turning point in the COVID-19 pandemic, Commonwealth Latinos seek to ensure a fair and just future. The Pennsylvania Latino Convention in Reading took place September 28-30 and covered more than two dozen topics such as poverty, voter engagement and health. Over 300 people […]]]>

As political lines are literally redrawn and vaccination efforts provide a possible turning point in the COVID-19 pandemic, Commonwealth Latinos seek to ensure a fair and just future.

The Pennsylvania Latino Convention in Reading took place September 28-30 and covered more than two dozen topics such as poverty, voter engagement and health. Over 300 people attended the convention.

Norman Bristol, president and founder of the convention, said organizers understand that Latinos have different needs and come from a wide variety of backgrounds. The convention was meant to accommodate them, he said.

“We have over 25 workshops here based on that diversity,” Bristol said. “Some local communities, they have local problems that are completely different; Reading and Pittsburgh, they probably have completely different issues.

No workshop or roundtable focused solely on immigration issues, an intentional decision, Bristol said. Organizers asked presenters to incorporate the needs and challenges of immigrants into their presentations, as a single session on the topic wouldn’t do it justice, he said.

“The only way we’ll be able to approach the ratio is to have this dynamic and robust conversation from all of these angles,” Bristol said.

” Big change “

With the release of the 2020 census data, Pennsylvania begins the process of redesigning its congressional districts.

Over a million Latinos now live in the state, according to the 2020 US Census, but only three Latinos sit in the legislature of the 253 member states.

Experts argued that Latinos across the country were underestimated for fear their immigration information would be used against them – noting former President Donald Trump’s failure to ask a citizenship question at the census.

Fulvia Vargas-De Leon, a lawyer at LatinoJustice, said that while the number of Latinos in the Commonwealth is at an all-time high, that doesn’t necessarily mean their interests are protected.

“There is a lag between our population increase and the fact that we still have very low representation at the electoral level to effect a big change,” said Vargas-De Leon.

Other representatives of civic groups called for easier access to postal voting, encouraged people to contact elected leaders about gerrymandering, and stressed the need for more Latinos to run for office.

Health dynamics

Compared to whites, Latinos nationwide are more than three times more likely to be hospitalized and twice as likely to die from COVID-19.

Raffy Luquis is Professor of Health Education at Penn State. He said experts are finally recognizing the systemic marginalization of Latinos and other communities of color in healthcare.

“Racism is a health problem, a public health problem,” Luquis said. “The Centers for Disease Control (and Prevention), the National Institutes for Health and several other federal organizations see racism as the number one issue they are trying to get things done on. “

Dr Johanna Vidal-Phelan, a pediatrician at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, presented projections on how serious the pandemic would be if people were not getting vaccinated and wearing masks.

She also said Latinos have been vaccinated at a faster rate than whites in recent months, noting that targeted outreach and encouragement from trusted community leaders has helped.

Party and Politics

The workshops also addressed LGBT issues, youth leadership, housing, mental health and education.

The convention featured a gala that honored people who are the first Latinos elected to their posts, such as Reading Mayor Eddie Moran and Berks County Commissioner Michael Rivera.

Bristol said work on the convention continues with a report on a white paper that will draw on workshops and participant feedback. This report will be provided to state legislators and local leaders.

“The biggest outcome of the convention will be a policy document that we write, based on the policy recommendations that take place in all the workshops,” Bristol said.

There is no decision yet on where the annual event will take place in 2022.
Learn more about our partners, WITF.


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Campaign direct mail supporting late Mobile city councilor shakes political race in Alabama https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/campaign-direct-mail-supporting-late-mobile-city-councilor-shakes-political-race-in-alabama/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/campaign-direct-mail-supporting-late-mobile-city-councilor-shakes-political-race-in-alabama/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 01:54:26 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/campaign-direct-mail-supporting-late-mobile-city-councilor-shakes-political-race-in-alabama/ A campaign flyer sent to homes in downtown Mobile this week asking voters to support recently deceased City Council Chairman Levon Manzie was paid for by TSA PAC, a political action committee backed by a veteran of the Auburn’s Republican campaign. Municipal races in Alabama are non-partisan contests and candidates do not have to announce […]]]>

A campaign flyer sent to homes in downtown Mobile this week asking voters to support recently deceased City Council Chairman Levon Manzie was paid for by TSA PAC, a political action committee backed by a veteran of the Auburn’s Republican campaign.

Municipal races in Alabama are non-partisan contests and candidates do not have to announce their party affiliation to appear on a ballot. And Manzie was a supporter of Democratic politicians during his tenure.

TSA PAC was formed on August 31 and is led by Tripp Skipper, a Mobile native who has worked for various GOP candidates over the years, including US Senator Tommy Tuberville’s campaign last year.

“As a member of Mobile, I know that I hope the majority of voters will have the opportunity to elect a representative of their choice in a special election,” Skipper told AL.com on Thursday, a day after. WKRG-TV published a report on the arrival of mail this week in mailboxes in Manzie district.

The senders claim Manzie is still alive, but it is possible that they were posted before Manzie died on September 19. Manzie was 38 years old.

A follow-up mail, distributed throughout the district on Thursday, asks people to vote for Manzie as “the best way to honor his legacy.”

Campaign funding information on the Alabama Secretary of State’s website shows the money for leaflets apparently coming from the Mobile-based Southern Alabamians For Good Government, a PAC that supports various candidates for the City of Mobile office and funneled over $ 322,000 to Mobile Mayor Sandy Stimpson since he first ran for office in 2013.

TSA PAC’s only major contribution since its inception has come from Southern Impact Group LLC, which is based in Auburn and, according to Secretary of State’s records, was also formed by Skipper in 2018.

According to state records, TSA PAC received a contribution of $ 25,000 from Southern Impact Group on September 20, five days after South Alabamians for Good Government paid $ 37,000 to Southern Impact Group, which provides advice. An additional $ 5,000 from Southern Impact Group was paid to TSA Group on September 23.

TSA Group, in its only expense to date, spent $ 28,122.65 in advertising costs for FP1 Strategies LLC, based in Arlington, Virginia.

‘Afterthoughts’

Mobile City Council Chairman Levon Manzie holds up a leaflet that was mailed throughout his municipal district that he said contained misleading information about a plan to annex 13,000 residents in the city of Mobile. He said the leaflets, however, inspired what he says is a push to roll back city police and fire services provided to residents within the police jurisdiction 3 miles outside of boundaries. from the city. Two years later, in 2021 and after Manzie’s death, a new leaflet supporting the late city councilor is circulating in his district that some – including the local NAACP leader – also deem misleading. (John Sharp/jsharp@al.com).

The arrival of the campaign flyers comes at a sensitive time for Mobile City Council District 2, which is without council representation after Levon Manzie’s mother Jeanette Manzie suddenly withdrew her name from consideration as temporary council replacement on Tuesday.

Jeanette Manzie was presented on Monday by Stimpson as her recommendation for the replacement of her late son for the duration of her term, which is November 1. The Manzie family are pushing for Levon Manzie to win Tuesday’s second round against former city councilor William Carroll, saying they want to ‘finish the race’.

Early Tuesday morning, Stimpson said Jeanette Manzie was removed from the exam, but he did not explain why. The city council voted to table his nomination without discussion.

Jeanette Manzie, according to the media, cannot vote. She was convicted by a jury in 1992 of felony theft in a felony that amounted to stealing less than $ 30 worth of clothing.

Stimpson said he had no plans to make another date until Tuesday’s second round. The next Mobile City Council meeting is Wednesday.

If Levon Manzie wins the second round, it will trigger a special election that could generate widespread interest in Mobile with major issues looming such as an annexation vote. The special election would take place after November 1, when the new council will be sworn in. If Carroll wins, there will be no special election.

Carroll said Wednesday night he knew nothing about the leaflets. “We haven’t seen it.”

Harry Austin, Manzie’s campaign manager, said Wednesday evening that he was also unaware of the flyers.

In recent days, some pastors from black organizations have expressed concerns over the campaign’s persistence beyond Tuesday, citing annexation and the requirement for a qualified majority vote in city council. The council is represented by four white and three black members in an increasingly majority-minority city. Any change to the city’s qualified majority requirement on nearly all council votes would require the approval of a referendum.

Mobile’s city council in 2019 voted 4-3 in favor of a Stimpson-backed annexation plan. A qualified majority of five votes, however, was needed for it to go to voters in a special election that would likely have taken place in late 2019 or early 2020.

This vote fell along racial lines – Manzie and the other two black members of the council voted against the plan, while the four white members voted in favor of it.

After Stimpson was easily re-elected on August 24, groups supporting a new annexation lobbied for it to be reconsidered after 2020 U.S. Census figures showed Mobile had lost around 8,000 residents or 4 , 1% of its population in the past 10 years. Stimpson said he does not expect the issue to be reconsidered and voted on by the council until Nov. 1.

The demography of the city is changing. Although the city’s black population has seen a loss of 2,697, the city’s minority-majority percentage has grown over the past decade: mobile now counts 51% black and 40% white. In 2010, the racial makeup was 50.4% Black, 45.4% White. Under the 2019 annexation plan, which would have brought properties to the predominantly white western edges of Mobile, the city’s racial makeup would have been more balanced at 48.8% black and 46.7% white.

Robert Clopton, chairman of the Mobile County NAACP, said he believed the flyers were “ulterior motives” of those who rejected them.

“They are (supported) an opportunity for an election that could be persuaded by these groups,” Clopton said. “I am sure they are better equipped financially for another election than anyone else in this riding, including Mr. Carroll.”

Clopton added, “The district needs a representative ASAP and they need one now. The runoff must be decided. I don’t know Mr. Carroll but he’s # 2. He is in contention. I think he should be elected so that the board member represents his district. “

“Critical race”

Ward 2

In Mobile City Council District 2, William Carroll faces incumbent Councilor Levon Manzie in the run-off on October 5, 2021. Levon Manzie died on September 19, 2021, but his name will remain on the ballot. (John Sharp/jsharp@al.com).

Manzie never lost an election during his tenure as a member of the Mobile County School Board and during his two terms on city council. He finished the August 24 election with 48 percent of the vote in a six-party race. He lost just two percentage points avoiding a second round.

Carroll, who served two terms on the board until 2013, finished second with 23% of the vote.

“It’s a critical race and we’re definitely watching it,” said Clopton.

He added, “We are intensifying our efforts to educate the electorate in this constituency on the possible outcome of the election. They really need to be represented now, not in months. “

Wade Perry, executive chairman of the Alabama Democratic Party, called the late city councilor a “great Democrat” and a supporter of the state party. He said Manzie also “got cross votes and support” from Republicans “going back to his first school board race” which took place in 2008.

“It’s positive and not negative and it’s not my job to tell Republicans what they can and can’t do,” Perry said of the TSA PAC support. “It’s the job of Republican President John Wahl.”

Alabama Executive Director Reed Phillips in a statement to AL.com said the state organization “does not have an opinion on the activities of a political action committee during a non-partisan municipal election that does not involve a member of the state executive committee “.

Stimpson’s office declined to comment.

The Southern Alabamians for Good Government, according to recent campaign records, also injected $ 23,000 directly into Manzie’s campaign over the summer and before Manzie’s death. Only Scott Jones, who received $ 33,000 from the PAC, got more in the recent campaign cycle, state records show. Jones will face Josh Woods in the second round on Tuesday.

None of the five other candidates vying for the District 2 seat ahead of the August 24 election received funding from the organization.

The PAC is led by Richard Weavil, who did not respond to a call for comment.

Cory Penn, who appears in the District 1 second round against Herman Thomas on Tuesday, received $ 11,000 in contributions from the PAC. Thomas got $ 4,000, according to state records. The two are in the running to replace longtime city councilor Fred Richardson, who is leaving council on November 1. Richardson, who backs Thomas, remains one of the most vocal opponents of annexation.

TSA PAC is also circulating a leaflet supporting Penn, who said he was just focusing on winning Tuesday’s election.

“We appreciate everyone who sponsors us,” Penn said. “We have supportive people all over the community. We can’t tell people who to support and not to do certain things. We focus on building a strong city of Mobile. This has been our ultimate goal since the start of the campaign.


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