Political State – Milwaukee County First http://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 14:12:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-7-1.png Political State – Milwaukee County First http://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/ 32 32 Donald Trump slams Fulton DA Fani Willis for ‘political witch hunt’ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/donald-trump-slams-fulton-da-fani-willis-for-political-witch-hunt/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 13:59:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/donald-trump-slams-fulton-da-fani-willis-for-political-witch-hunt/ ATLANTA, Ga. (CBS46) – Former President Donald Trump slammed Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis late Monday afternoon, accusing him of conducting a “strictly political witch hunt” as it was pursuing an investigation into alleged elections interfering in the 2020 presidential vote count. In a statement, the nation’s 45th president also targeted Atlanta as “number […]]]>

ATLANTA, Ga. (CBS46) – Former President Donald Trump slammed Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis late Monday afternoon, accusing him of conducting a “strictly political witch hunt” as it was pursuing an investigation into alleged elections interfering in the 2020 presidential vote count.

In a statement, the nation’s 45th president also targeted Atlanta as “number 1 in the nation for murder and heinous crime, especially per capita — even worse than the now legendary Chicago.”

“Yet the district attorney spends almost all of his waking hours there, which are not many, trying to prosecute a very popular president, Donald J. Trump, who got more votes in 2020 than any president. in office in the history of the United States.”

Last year, Willis opened a criminal investigation “into attempts to influence the administration of the 2020 general election in Georgia.” A special grand jury with subpoena power was seated in May at his request. In documents filed in court last month, she alleged “a coordinated, multi-state plan by the Trump campaign to influence the results of the November 2020 election in Georgia and elsewhere.”

Willis’ investigation revolves around an alleged conspiracy involving 16 Republicans who served as fake voters, one of whom has been identified as state Sen. Burt Jones, the GOP nominee for lieutenant governor this fall.

Governor Brian Kemp was also called to testify before the grand jury, but Fulton County Superior Court Judge Robert McBurney agreed to allow Kemp to testify after this year’s scheduled midterm elections. for November 8.

Last month, Kemp filed the motion to quash the subpoena on the same day that Trump’s personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, testified before that same grand jury.

Kemp faces a re-election challenge from Democrat Stacey Abrams, whom he beat in the 2018 open gubernatorial race by just a few thousand votes, an election Abrams has yet to concede.

Trump also defended his now-famous phone call with Georgian Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger days after the last presidential election. Willis, he said, “bases his potential claims on trying to find one little word or phrase (that isn’t there) on an absolutely PERFECT phone call, regarding widespread voter fraud in Georgia, with Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger and numerous lawyers. and other officials who were knowingly on the line, had no problem with the call, and expressed no objections or complaints about anything I said on the call that could be construed as inappropriate.

In June, Raffensperger told a congressional committee investigating the January 6, 2021 attack on the U.S. Capitol that Trump’s claims about 2020 voter fraud “were false.”

The Georgia secretary of state, along with Gabriel Sterling, the bureau’s chief operating officer, appeared before the Democratic-led House Select Committee when the committee resumed its series of nationally televised public hearings.

Raffensperger told the committee that the Nov. 6, 2020, election went “remarkably smoothly,” with average wait times for the vote between two and three minutes statewide.

“I think we had a successful election,” Raffensperger said.

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Explore the history of our state’s medical governors https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/explore-the-history-of-our-states-medical-governors/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 13:35:22 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/explore-the-history-of-our-states-medical-governors/ Nick Perencevich of Concord is a semi-retired doctor. Most of our New Hampshire governors throughout history have been lawyers, businessmen, and sometimes military leaders, but very rarely doctors. US President Josiah Bartlett played by Martin Sheen in the popular television series West Wing is named after Dr. Josiah Bartlett, signer of the Declaration of Independence […]]]>

Nick Perencevich of Concord is a semi-retired doctor.

Most of our New Hampshire governors throughout history have been lawyers, businessmen, and sometimes military leaders, but very rarely doctors.

US President Josiah Bartlett played by Martin Sheen in the popular television series West Wing is named after Dr. Josiah Bartlett, signer of the Declaration of Independence and later Governor of New Hampshire (1970-1794).

He and his contemporary medical colleagues, Joseph Warren in Boston and Benjamin Rush, were politically active in shaping our new nation. In the 1840s, Dr. Joseph Harper was Governor, followed briefly by Dr. Henry Quinby in 1909. Some people will still remember Dr. Robert Blood who was Governor during World War II. Governor Blood has worked hard during his two terms to ensure good medical care is provided to returning veterans.

Reading their stories, it seems that these past medical governors all brought hard work and honor to New Hampshire. In November, the Democratic challenger to our current governor will be a doctor.

The most recent story from a medical governor outside of New Hampshire shows Dr. Ralph Northam of Virginia whose term just ended this year. Virginia does not allow governors to serve more than one term at a time. John Kitzhaber of Oregon and John Dean of Vermont, both in office about 20 years ago, were both active doctors when elected and each served for 12 years. All had very good records of service as governors as well as previous elected positions.

When looking at America’s national leaders, a doctor’s record is more mixed. US Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky was an ophthalmologist before being elected to the Senate. Unlike all of the doctors listed above, he was never elected to political office before becoming a US Senator.

When you look at the international scene, President Bashar Al-Assad of Syria was also an ophthalmologist. He, like Senator Paul, has never held office before. Their fathers were important political figures who paved the way for their sons.

Physician training emphasizes being a good listener, then trying to make the correct diagnosis, and then formulating a treatment plan that works for each patient. Understanding public health and the science of medicine are also prerequisites for becoming a qualified doctor. There’s nothing to stop another pan-epidemic, but I’d like to think we’ll be better prepared in New Hampshire if we have a medical governor.

There is no guarantee that this will be the case. However, we might want to avoid electing ophthalmologists with politically powerful fathers. Virginia Governor Northam navigated his state through COVID with stellar numbers. Medical Governors Kitzhaber and Dean also guided their states to be leaders in adult end-of-life legislation.

When we vote in November, we must carefully consider the backgrounds, training and ethics of those we are voting for. It is still rare for doctors to stand for election, but that does not mean that they are not qualified.

In general, in the United States and in New Hampshire, over time, the few medical governors have done a great job. The training, experience and performance of a person serving the public are of paramount importance.

Either way, be sure to vote this fall.

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James Madison’s Senate criticism still stands https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/james-madisons-senate-criticism-still-stands/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 13:33:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/james-madisons-senate-criticism-still-stands/ James Madison’s heart was clearly not in his argument in Federalist #62. Writing in late February 1788, when only six states had yet to ratify the Constitution, he had to explain why the Federal Convention had designed the Senate the way it had, giving little Delaware the same weight as his own Virginia, the state […]]]>

James Madison’s heart was clearly not in his argument in Federalist #62. Writing in late February 1788, when only six states had yet to ratify the Constitution, he had to explain why the Federal Convention had designed the Senate the way it had, giving little Delaware the same weight as his own Virginia, the state the most populated in the country. This decision, writes Madison, was “obviously the result of a compromise between the opposing claims of large and small states”. There was no way to justify it on principle, he continued, because it was “a part of the constitution which is universally accepted as the result not of a theory, but of a spirit of friendship, and that the mutual deference and concession which the peculiarity of our political situation made indispensable.

The words Madison quoted came from the letter in which George Washington, the President of the Convention, announced the completion of its work on September 17, 1787 – the date we now celebrate (though not widely enough) as the day of the Constitution. What this diplomatic language hid was Madison’s deep disappointment not only with the Senate voting rule, but also with the fact that it was the only provision of the new Constitution not subject to amendment. Today, as controversies over the Senate’s performance have grown heated, Madison’s objections remain relevant.

Madison surmised that if the more populous states could come to a consensus on a new constitution, the less populous would eventually relent.

Even before the Federal Convention came into effect in late May 1787, delegations from the great states of Virginia and Pennsylvania had privately discussed whether the body should follow a different voting rule than the one the Continental Congress had been in use since 1774, giving each state one vote. Pennsylvanians vigorously preferred to deny small states an equal vote. But as Madison noted in her notes, rather than giving the smaller states an ultimatum upfront, Virginians thought “it would be easier to convince them” to cede their equal status “during deliberations.”

In setting his agenda for the Convention, Madison assumed that while the more populous states could come to a consensus on a new constitution, the less populous ones would eventually give in to their decision. Madison believed that small states could be persuaded that they neither needed nor deserved an equal vote in either house of Congress. Under the Virginia Plan proposed by his “dear friend” Edmund Randolph at the opening of the debate, a proportional representation scheme assigned by population and wealth would apply to both houses of the new Congress.

But Madison’s trust proved misguided. Small states like Delaware, Connecticut and New Hampshire have persisted in their commitment to equality in the Senate. The decisive vote of July 16 is generally called the Great Compromise, but in reality it was a victory for the small states: By a vote of five states against four, with one state (the populous Massachusetts) divided, each state, whatever regardless of size, would enjoy equal representation in the Senate.

The vote left populous state delegates in disarray. The next morning they huddle to assess the situation. As Madison recorded the conversation, he and some of his allies believed that the larger states should go it alone and come up with a constitution based on proportional voting in both houses of Congress. Others felt they had to “give in to small states,” even if it meant coming up with a “flawed and objectionable” constitution.

This disagreement doomed any ploy the big states might have launched. He committed the United States to a scheme of political representation that empowered an artificial minority that existed simply because of the borders that defined states as geographical units.

If that failure wasn’t consequential enough, on September 15, the Convention’s last day of debate, the framers discussed the constitutional amendment rules set out in Article V. When Connecticut’s Roger Sherman proposed “another condition stating that no state will be “deprived of its equal vote in the Senate,” Madison replied that such a statement would invite other states to “insist on” their own particular clauses. The Convention then decisively rejected Sherman’s motion. The principle of an equal vote in the Senate for each state would thus be subject to further review and revision.

But that didn’t end the discussion. As Madison sadly noted, “the circulating whispers of small states” swept through the chamber. Anxious to complete their work, and to present the Constitution as the product of a consensus binding all the States, the drafters quickly did an about face. Without further debate, they immediately made equal state voting in the Senate the only non-amendable clause.

How different would American politics have been had big states prevailed?

How different would American politics have been if the big states had won on those two crucial votes? Such counterfactuals are intriguing but still speculative. More important are Madison’s arguments, which have lost none of their power in the years since.

The standard rationale for equal state voting in the Senate is that residents of less populous states have distinct interests that require special protection. Conversely, the more populous states are thought to share another set of interests that might incline them to dominate their less populous neighbors.

Madison understood the absurdity of these views. People never vote based on the size of the state they live in, except in a situation like 1787, when they vote on the voting rules and have a vested advantage to preserve. As citizens or legislators, we vote according to our interests and opinions, our age and profession, our religious, ethnic or racial identity, etc. But we never ask, what is good for small states or big states?

This is why Madison and her allies believed that small states could be persuaded. On what basis could Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts form a pact to govern the other states? The big differences between states, he explained, had much more to do with their climate, which shaped their economies, and the presence or absence of slave labor that resulted. “As to mores, religion, and other circumstances, which sometimes engender affection between different communities,” Madison said, the great states were no more bound to each other than to other states. When pressed to respond to these points, the best answer Connecticut delegate Oliver Ellsworth could muster was that “although no particular abuse can be foreseen by him, the possibility that they are sufficient to alarm him”.

The idea that citizens of less populous states needed special protection in a chamber of Congress remains the most enduring error in American constitutional tradition. Senators from Wyoming and Vermont are not making common cause simply because they are our least populated states and there is no dangerous alliance between California and Texas.

The interests and preferences we share are spread across the national landscape, and even in an age of partisan polarization, the size of our state, as Madison would have predicted, makes no difference to how it votes. As we commemorate the 235th anniversary of the making of the Constitution, the flawed foundation of the Senate remains a disturbing fact that we have yet to confront.

Copyright ©2022 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All rights reserved. 87990cbe856818d5eddac44c7b1cdeb8

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New York political leaders offer muted response to outcry over yeshivas https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/new-york-political-leaders-offer-muted-response-to-outcry-over-yeshivas/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 21:41:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/new-york-political-leaders-offer-muted-response-to-outcry-over-yeshivas/ NEW YORK — New York’s political leaders have so far offered a muted response to an outcry this week over ultra-Orthodox Jewish schools, or yeshivas, after the state passed new rules to regulate secular education in schools and a damning report on the yeshiva system by The New York Times. State education officials on Tuesday […]]]>

NEW YORK — New York’s political leaders have so far offered a muted response to an outcry this week over ultra-Orthodox Jewish schools, or yeshivas, after the state passed new rules to regulate secular education in schools and a damning report on the yeshiva system by The New York Times.

State education officials on Tuesday finalized rules that will tighten oversight of yeshivas and other nonpublic schools, and require them to provide a minimum level of secular education in four main areas. The new rules, drawn up for years, have drawn outrage from ultra-Orthodox communities.

A New York Times investigation published Sunday found dismal secular education in many yeshivas, which have received hundreds of millions of dollars in funding over the past few years, and some instances of corporal punishment. Funding for yeshivas is minor compared to the sums allocated to public schools, and the shortcomings of yeshivas in secular studies have been debated for years.

New York State Governor Kathy Hochul, a strong supporter of Jewish communities, deferred responsibility for the issue on Monday.

“We believe that every child in New York State deserves a very high quality education. People understand that this is not within the jurisdiction of the governor,” Hochul said. “There is a regulatory process in place, but the governor’s office has nothing to do with it.”

Hochul is running against Republican Lee Zeldin in the race for state governor. Hochul holds a firm but not insurmountable lead over his opponent. Ultra-Orthodox voters can be a force in state politics, and yeshivas are one of their priorities.

Zeldin, who is Jewish, forbidden yeshivas and attacked Hochul on Tuesday.

“Yeshiva education teaches values ​​that enable their students to lead productive, law-abiding lives. New York is so wrong to pass its new substantial equivalence rule today. Hochul, for his pathetic part, was totally AWOL,” Zeldin said.

Members of ultra-Orthodox Jewish communities stage a protest outside a board meeting to vote on new requirements that private schools teach English, math and history to high school students outside the New York State Department of Education building in Albany, New York, Sept. 12, 2022. (Will Waldron/The Albany Times Union via AP)

New York City Mayor Eric Adams said he was “not concerned” by the findings of the New York Times investigation of yeshiva scholars, but said the use of corporal punishment in schools was “not acceptable”.

He confirmed that an investigation into the matter was progressing.

“That’s what the city needs to do,” he said. “We’re going to make sure every child gets a quality education in this city.”

A survey of yeshivas stalled for years under Adams’ predecessor, Bill de Blasio.

Brooklyn Borough President Antonio Reynoso has linked the yeshiva system to the Holocaust.

“Less than 100 years ago, during the Holocaust, the Jewish people were virtually extinct. Many came to New York not to preserve their way of life, but to revive it,” he said in response to New York Times inquiry “Our city has been supportive and rightfully extended courtesy to them in this mission.”

“Education is extremely important to my administration. As such, our office will work with community leaders to ensure that all children have access to high quality education,” Reynoso said.

U.S. House Representative Jerry Nadler, a Jewish yeshiva graduate who represents parts of Manhattan and Brooklyn, said he was “deeply saddened” by the investigation.

“I have long believed that all yeshiva graduates — and all children in New York City — can and should receive a high-quality secular education,” Nadler said. “Although many Jewish schools and yeshivas provide such an education, it is clear that some fail completely.”

“It is our duty to all New Yorkers to make sure the law is enforced,” he said.

New York State Senators Chuch Schumer and Kristen Gillibrand did not comment.

New York City Comptroller Brad Lander called the lack of secular education in yeshivas a “tragedy” and sworn to apply the new regulation of the Ministry of Education.

State Senator Liz Krueger, who represents parts of Manhattan and is Jewish, called the survey “a damning indictment” of schools and officials charged with overseeing them.

Several other state lawmakers, including Charles Lavine, Julia Salazar, and Emily Gallagher, have focused on reports of corporal punishment in yeshivas. All three said they would introduce legislation banning corporal punishment in schools, which is allowed; Salazar and Gallagher, who represent parts of Brooklyn where many yeshivas are based, did not mention secular studies in their joint statement.

US House candidate Daniel Goldman, who recently won his much-watched New York Democratic primary, says the survey “paints a damning picture of an inadequate secular education that does not respect state law.

Goldman, also Jewish, said he was “hopeful that the yeshivas referenced in the Times report will begin work immediately under upcoming regulations.”

The Yiddish newspaper Der Blatt, based in the Satmar movement’s stronghold of Williamsburg, headlined its next issue with the word “War” in big red letters, saying state officials had attacked the community.

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Jessie Trudeau receives the 2022 Franklin L. Burdette/Pi Sigma Alpha Award – https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/jessie-trudeau-receives-the-2022-franklin-l-burdette-pi-sigma-alpha-award/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 21:10:58 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/jessie-trudeau-receives-the-2022-franklin-l-burdette-pi-sigma-alpha-award/ The Franklin L. Burdette/Pi Sigma Alpha Prize is awarded annually by the American Political Science Association (APSA) to honor the best paper presented at the previous year’s annual meeting. by Jessie Trudeau the work covers comparative politics and political economy, with a substantial focus on crime, violence, inequality and corruption. She has completed her doctorate. […]]]>

The Franklin L. Burdette/Pi Sigma Alpha Prize is awarded annually by the American Political Science Association (APSA) to honor the best paper presented at the previous year’s annual meeting.

by Jessie Trudeau the work covers comparative politics and political economy, with a substantial focus on crime, violence, inequality and corruption. She has completed her doctorate. in government in 2022 from Harvard University and is a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Philosophy, Politics and Economics at Brown University. In the fall of 2023, she will begin an assistant professorship of political science at Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Public Affairs and Citizenship. Jessie’s research sheds light on how electoral politics works in the presence of organized crime. His book project Machine Gun Politics: Why Politicians Cooperate With Criminal Groups, explains what politicians can gain by associating with criminal actors. This project brings together a quasi-experimental study of voting, an original criminal governance database, and 18 months of extensive fieldwork in a mixed-methods study in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Working papers from his dissertation recently won awards from the American Political Science Association (APSA) and the Latin American Studies Association (LASA). Another body of recent work focuses on the implications of public security on inequality and violence, and was referenced in Brazilian Supreme Court testimony regarding the legality of police raids. His work has been published or is to be published in Global Development, Economy, and The Washington Post, and was funded by the Corporación Andino de Fomiento (CAF), the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies (DRCLAS), the Harvard Brazil Cities Initiative, the Foundations of Human Behavior Initiative (FHB), the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs and the Institute for Quantitative Social Sciences.

Quote from the award committee:

The committee is pleased to award the 2022 Franklin R. Burdette/Pi Sigma Alpha Award to Jessie Trudeau for “Machine Gun Politics: Why Politicians Cooperate with Criminal Groups”. This paper stands out as the top paper presented at the American Political Science Association’s 2021 Annual Meeting in Seattle, Washington. Trudeau’s paper is a fantastic contribution to the study of state-criminal interactions in Latin America, estimating the extent of criminal influence on voting beyond descriptive research.

Trudeau’s main contribution is a greater depth in our understanding of criminal domination in electoral politics and its implications for inequality and violence. Trudeau’s analysis provides evidence of how criminal governance affects electoral competition: by supplying voters and restricting access to candidacy. These results have important implications for access to elections and criminal governance.

This study is multi-method, first drawing on an original database on criminal governance in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, which shows which criminal groups governed favelas from 2015 to 2020, and comparing it to data of voters, demonstrating that the vote differs when criminal groups are present. Specifically, crime-dominated favelas have higher voter turnout and lower levels of electoral competition. Further, Trudeau supplements these findings with 18 months of field research with more than 50 candidates for local and state legislative office, their employees, members of criminal groups, and residents of crime-dominated communities.

The article is masterfully written, methodologically innovative and perfectly argued. The document offers a high level of detail and takes its audience through the theory in a strategic way. Overall, this study has broad implications in political science as it helps to better understand elections and democracy in contexts where criminal groups govern.

APSA thanks Pi Sigma Alpha for supporting the award and committee members for their services: Dr. Mario Guerrero (president) of California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, Dr. Alexander George Theodoridis of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and Dr. Aubrey Westfall of Wheaton College.

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GOP candidates for secretary of state see corrupt political system https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/gop-candidates-for-secretary-of-state-see-corrupt-political-system/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 21:49:53 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/gop-candidates-for-secretary-of-state-see-corrupt-political-system/ WEST PALM BEACH, Florida. – Four Republicans seeking to overhaul the way the election is run by becoming their state’s election chief said on Saturday they were battling a corrupt system – even pointing the finger at mysterious forces within their own party. The candidates – Mark Finchem of Arizona, Kristina Karamo of Michigan, Jim […]]]>

WEST PALM BEACH, Florida. – Four Republicans seeking to overhaul the way the election is run by becoming their state’s election chief said on Saturday they were battling a corrupt system – even pointing the finger at mysterious forces within their own party.

The candidates – Mark Finchem of Arizona, Kristina Karamo of Michigan, Jim Marchant of Nevada and Audrey Trujillo of New Mexico – appeared at a conference in the ballroom of a South Florida hotel that featured many speakers falsely claiming that the 2020 election was stolen from former President Donald Trump.

“Our greatest enemy is our own party,” said Marchant, a businessman and former state lawmaker who was among Trump’s staunchest supporters challenging President Joe Biden’s 2020 victory in Nevada. “Even though we are Republicans, we are sort of underdogs. We have a battle, but we are not giving up.

A d

All are members of the America First Secretary of State Coalition, which calls for large-scale changes in elections. While not officially tied to Trump’s America First movement, it’s part of a larger effort to promote conservative candidates who align themselves with the former president’s views.

Eliminating voting machines, mail-in ballots and early voting are part of their plans. The coalition also supports manual counting of all ballots and a single voting day for all Americans with few exceptions. They did not say whether Election Day should be a national holiday.

Many of their ideas are based on unsubstantiated claims that voting machines are manipulated. Nearly two years after the 2020 election, no evidence has emerged to suggest widespread fraud or manipulation, while state-by-state reviews have confirmed results showing Biden won.

A d

The four are among nearly one in three Republican candidates vying for statewide positions that play a role in overseeing, certifying or advocating for elections that supported the nullification of election results. the 2020 presidential race, according to an Associated Press review.

Election experts say candidates who challenge the results of a valid election in which there was no evidence of wrongdoing pose a risk of interference in future elections. They warn it could trigger chaos if they refuse to accept or challenge results they don’t like.

With less than nine weeks to go until the November election, candidates took time off the campaign trail in their own state to participate in the event, hosted by the coalition secretary of state and the Florida affiliate of The America Project . The America Project was founded by Michael Flynn, retired lieutenant general and former national security adviser to Trump, and Patrick Byrne, founder of Overstock.com.

A d

It was the latest in a nationwide effort to challenge the results of the 2020 election and promote conspiracy theories about voting machines and the operation of election offices. The forums, held for more than a year, have helped undermine confidence in the election among large sections of the Republican Party.

A few hundred people attended Saturday’s conference, which included numerous panels claiming the election was being manipulated in various ways. A panel was made up of former candidates — Democrats and Republicans from across the country — who sought to challenge their electoral losses in an effort to challenge their states’ elected officials.

A d

Karamo, a community college professor, rose to prominence after the 2020 election for claiming to have seen irregularities in the processing of mail-in ballots while she was an election observer in Detroit. She called the electoral system corrupt.

“It’s not a partisan issue. It’s a freedom issue,” Karamo said. “That’s why you see people in our own party, pretending to be Republicans, trying to silence us and stop us. “Even though we’re the Republican candidates for this office, we have people in our own party trying to make us lose. Because they’re in on it.”

A thorough review of Michigan’s 2020 election by Republicans who control the state legislature found no systemic fraud or issues that would have altered the results. Similar reviews in other battleground states have come to the same conclusion. Dozens of court cases brought by Trump and his allies have been dismissed, and even the former president’s Justice Department has found no evidence of widespread fraud.

A d

Nonetheless, the Republican nominee secretary speaking on Saturday spoke of a system they see as hopelessly corrupt.

Finchem said he did his job as a state legislator by calling a public hearing to discuss election concerns and noted how Arizona Governor Doug Ducey, a Republican in his last term, has dismissed the effort: “How do you find me now, Doug?” Finchem said.

He added: “We are in battle against a cartel.”

Finchem was in the United States Capitol on January 6, 2021, before Trump supporters attacked Congress and pushed to have Biden’s victory in Arizona taken away, which the law provides no way to do.

False claims about the 2020 election have led to death threats against election officials and workers, prompting some to leave the profession and raising concerns about the loss of experienced professionals overseeing the November elections.

A d

Repeated false allegations of a stolen election have also eroded faith in US elections. A 2021 Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll found that about two-thirds of Republicans say they don’t think Biden was legitimately elected.

Trujillo, a small-business owner from the central New Mexico town of Corrales, said she wants state officials to uphold the law on elections and increase transparency. For example, she raised concerns about the security of drop boxes used to return mail-in ballots, even though there is no evidence of widespread problems with drop boxes.

She also criticized election officials for being dismissive or even condescending to doubting voters.

A d

“We have questions as voters and we should be able to ask them,” Trujillo said in an interview after speaking on the panel. “We shouldn’t be like, ‘OK, we can’t ask for this because it’s taboo and we’ll look like we’re trying to challenge the election.’ Because the integrity has to be there. It has to be very transparent.”

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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Political science professor Shirin Saeidi appointed director of Middle East studies https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/political-science-professor-shirin-saeidi-appointed-director-of-middle-east-studies/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 05:10:25 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/political-science-professor-shirin-saeidi-appointed-director-of-middle-east-studies/ Photo submitted Shirin Saidi Shirin Saeidi has been appointed director of the King Fahd Center for Middle East Studies at U of A’s Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences. Saeidi joined the U of A as an assistant professor of political science with a cross-appointment in Middle Eastern studies in 2018 and […]]]>



Photo submitted

Shirin Saidi

Shirin Saeidi has been appointed director of the King Fahd Center for Middle East Studies at U of A’s Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences.

Saeidi joined the U of A as an assistant professor of political science with a cross-appointment in Middle Eastern studies in 2018 and is the first woman to lead the Middle Eastern studies program since the founding of the center in the early 1990s.

“Having Dr. Saeidi lead our Middle East Studies program is an incredible opportunity for our college, our students, our community and beyond,” said Kathryn Sloan, Acting Dean of Fulbright College. “She brings a wealth of experience to the role of director through her more than 10 years of fieldwork in Iran and her interest in gender, activism, citizenship, Islamism and the role of women in authoritarian countries. .”

Saeidi’s teaching and research also focuses on international relations, comparative politics, qualitative methodology, theory, deviance, conflict and state formation, citizenship and nationalism, Islamism, feminist studies, sexuality and gender studies, and religion with a particular focus on the Middle East region.

His book, Women and the Islamic Republic: How Gendered Citizenship Conditions the Iranian State, was published by Cambridge University Press in January 2022, and Saeidi has also published numerous peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and book reviews.

“My work draws on archival and ethnographic methods, and I have also conducted interviews with non-elite, former and current prisoners, military and state officials, and guerrilla fighters” said Saeidi, who is fluent in Persian. “My research commitments have taken me to Iran, and my geographic area of ​​interest is freedom.”

Saeidi said she also looked forward to working with students in the Middle East Studies program and supervising “ambitious graduate students interested in reinventing everything from the container of the nation-state to the abolition of the prison industrial complex, and even of the hierarchical international system”.

Saeidi was also recently appointed to the U of A Chancellor’s Commission on Women, serves as a professor-in-residence, and participates in the Adopt a Professor program.

In addition, she is Deputy Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Citizenship Studies, as a reviewer for several scholarly journals and monographs, and was previously a technical advisor to the United Nations Women’s Programme. She is also a member of the Middle East Studies Association, the International Studies Association and the Feminist Political Economy of the Middle East and North Africa.

Saeidi holds a BA in Government and Politics from the University of Maryland and a Ph.D. in Politics and International Studies from the University of Cambridge. She was also a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Global Cooperation Research and at the University of Duisburg-Essen in Germany.

Learn more about Saeidi’s research and fieldwork in this Brief Talks from the Hill podcast.

About the King Fahd Center for Middle East Studies: The King Fahd Center for Middle East Studies is an academic and research unit of the Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Arkansas, dedicated to the study of the modern Middle East and the geocultural area in which civilization Islam has flourished and continues. shape the history of the world. The Center for Interdisciplinary and Interdepartmental Studies provides diverse cultural, intellectual, and educational opportunities to the campus community and promotes research and teaching in interdisciplinary Middle Eastern studies. The center offers an undergraduate major in Middle Eastern Studies, a minor, and supports graduate study in related departments.

About the University of Arkansas: As Arkansas’ flagship institution, the U of A offers an internationally competitive education in more than 200 academic programs. Founded in 1871, the U of A contributes more than $2.2 billion to the Arkansas economy through the teaching of new knowledge and skills, entrepreneurship and employment development, discovery through research and creative activity while providing training for professional disciplines. The Carnegie Foundation ranks the U of A among the few American colleges and universities with the highest level of research activity. US News and World Report ranks the U of A among the top public universities in the nation. Learn how the U of A is working to build a better world at Arkansas Research News.

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Chinese Xi and Russian Putin will meet next week in Central Asia (Russian state media) https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/chinese-xi-and-russian-putin-will-meet-next-week-in-central-asia-russian-state-media/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 13:56:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/chinese-xi-and-russian-putin-will-meet-next-week-in-central-asia-russian-state-media/ hong kong CNN — Chinese leader Xi Jinping and Russian President Vladimir Putin will meet on the sidelines of a summit in Uzbekistan next week, Russian envoy to Beijing Andrey Denisov told reporters on Wednesday, according to Russian news agency Tass. The scheduled meeting at the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) summit would be the first […]]]>


hong kong
CNN

Chinese leader Xi Jinping and Russian President Vladimir Putin will meet on the sidelines of a summit in Uzbekistan next week, Russian envoy to Beijing Andrey Denisov told reporters on Wednesday, according to Russian news agency Tass.

The scheduled meeting at the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) summit would be the first face-to-face between the two leaders, who have established a close relationship, since the Russian invasion of Ukraine earlier this year.

It would also be Xi’s first overseas trip since the early days of the coronavirus pandemic, and would come just weeks before a big political meeting in Beijing, where he is expected to break with tradition and take on a third term in office. cementing his role. as China’s most powerful leader for decades.

“This summit promises to be interesting, as it will be the first full-fledged summit since the pandemic,” Denisov said, according to Tass.

“I don’t mean that online summits are not full-fledged, but still, direct communication between leaders is a different quality of discussion… We are planning a serious and full-fledged meeting of our leaders with an order of the detailed day, that we are now working, in fact, with our Chinese partners,” the diplomat said.

China’s No. 3 Li Zhanshu, a member of the Communist Party of China’s Politburo Standing Committee, on Wednesday became the highest-ranking official to leave China since 2020, when he arrived in Vladivostok to attend the Eastern Economic Forum. Li was due to meet Putin on Wednesday, according to Tass.

Next week’s planned meeting between Xi and Putin – and the choice of where to take Xi’s first trip abroad – signals the importance of Russian relations for China, even in the face of the international backlash against Moscow after its invasion. unprovoked Ukraine earlier this year. .

Moscow and Beijing have become closer partners in recent years as both face tensions with the West, with Xi and Putin saying the two countries had a ‘limitless’ partnership weeks before the invasion. Ukraine by Russia. Beijing has since refused to condemn the aggression, repeatedly blaming NATO and the United States for the conflict.

Asked about Xi’s travel plans to Central Asia this month, China’s Foreign Ministry said Wednesday it could not provide any information.

The potential visit to Central Asia as Xi’s first official visit outside of China since the start of 2020 would also be a nod to his own legacy to boost China’s international profile during his decade in power. . Xi announced his flagship Belt and Road Initiative during a visit to Kazakhstan in 2013.

The SCO summit will be held from September 15 in Samarkand, Uzbekistan. The organization is made up of China, India, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Pakistan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan.

Alfred Wu, associate professor at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy at the National University of Singapore, said Xi’s decision to take a rare trip abroad just weeks before the 20th Chinese Party Congress could be interpreted as a sign of the leader’s confidence and strength. .

“It shows that most of the decisions on personnel arrangements for his third term have probably been made…I don’t really think he’s challenged domestically,” Wu said.

Putin is one of the few world leaders Xi has met in person since the start of 2020. The Russian leader traveled to Beijing for his Winter Olympics in February this year and was considered the world leader the most prominent to join the event, which a number of Western nations boycotted, citing China’s human rights record.

It was during this meeting that the two men framed their “limitless” partnership and published a 5,000-word document expressing their joint opposition to “NATO’s further enlargement” and pledging to “remain very vigilant to the negative impact of the United States”. Indo-Pacific Strategy.

China continued to denounce Western sanctions against Moscow and refused to condemn Russia, while Chinese energy companies bought Russian energy supplies at record levels, a boon for Russian companies amid Western sanctions.

On Tuesday, Russian energy giant Gazprom said it had signed an agreement to start shifting payments for gas supplies to China in yuan and rubles instead of dollars, a development that Putin pointed to. reference in his speech Wednesday at the Eastern Economic Forum.

While Russia and China have been brought closer by respective frictions with the West, the personal relationship between the two leaders, in which Xi described Putin as his “best intimate friend”, is also meant to boost the dynamics of their relationship. strengthening at the national level.

The two leaders have spoken on the phone twice since Russia invaded Ukraine, according to official records. Their latest call, which fell on Xi’s 69th birthday, continued the two leaders’ trend of celebrating each other’s birthdays when they coincide with diplomatic engagements.

China was “willing to work with Russia to promote solidarity and cooperation among emerging market countries…and push for the development of international order and global governance towards a more just and reasonable direction.” , Xi said at the time.

The trip and summit expected this month would only serve to strengthen that relationship, making in itself an important statement about how China’s current and future leader views his country’s allegiances.

Wu in Singapore said he expects the meeting to further cement both the friendship between Xi and Putin – and between China and Russia. He said it was no surprise that Xi chose to meet Putin instead of US or European leaders on his first trip abroad since the pandemic.

“If he goes to the United States or Europe, he will probably face many challenges. When he goes to see Putin, he will get all kinds of praise from his friend, who is happy to be a strong man,” Wu said.

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Is Iraq an underestimated risk on the oil markets? https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/is-iraq-an-underestimated-risk-on-the-oil-markets/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/is-iraq-an-underestimated-risk-on-the-oil-markets/ Iraq’s record oil exports could be hampered by growing political unrest across the country. While political instability has generally had little effect on the country’s oil industry, growing unrest now threatens Iraq’s oil production. Additionally, Iraq continues to fight for oil ownership in the Kurdistan region, adding to challenges for the industry. The Iraqi oil […]]]>

Iraq’s record oil exports could be hampered by growing political unrest across the country. While political instability has generally had little effect on the country’s oil industry, growing unrest now threatens Iraq’s oil production. Additionally, Iraq continues to fight for oil ownership in the Kurdistan region, adding to challenges for the industry.

The Iraqi oil industry had reported positive trends in recent monthswith production levels of approximately 4.4 billion bpd of crude, and exports highest levels in 50 years, worth $11.07 billion. The increase in exports was largely due to a shift in global dependence from Russia to other oil powers in recent months. Iraq holds firm 145 billion barrels of oil, making it the fifth largest oil state in the world. And crude is vitally important to Iraq’s economy, with oil revenues contributing around 90% of the country’s income.

However, growing political tensions across the country are now threatening these positive oil trends. In recent weeks, Iraq has seen its worst political violence since 2019, as the conflict between different Shiite groups intensifies. Street fighting in central Baghdad left at least 30 people dead. The conflict is centered around a battle between competing Shia factions. As the largest sectarian group in Iraq, different factions battle for political power as each group seeks to further grab the country’s oil wealth, as well as political dominance in the Middle East region. The unrest began in October 2021 following elections to Iraq’s parliament, the Council of Representatives. Sadr’s party, which won the majority of 73 of 329 seatsformed a coalition with the largest Sunni and Kurdish Arab parties, which together controlled the majority of seats, with the aim of forming a government.

Sadr was blocked by a group of Iranian-backed Shiite parties and his efforts ultimately failed as the Supreme Court ruled that a lack of majority support meant no government could be formed. In June, Sadr told his 73 members of parliament to resign in protest, later announcing he was quitting politics. Tens of thousands of his supporters then took to the streets of Baghdad and southern Iraq, torching opposition offices and battling Iranian-backed militia fighters within the Iraqi security forces. Sadr eventually told his followers to leave the area, further demonstrating his control over his militants.

While Iraq’s oil industry has been largely spared previous political turmoil, this recent upsurge in conflict threatens the sector. Fernando Ferreira, director of Rapidan Energy Group statement of the situation, “While Iraqi production is generally quite resilient to unrest, the current political environment is extraordinarily toxic and poses a considerable risk to the oil sector.” RBC commodities chief Helima Croft suggested this week that the protests could lead to one million bpd of oil taken off the market if the conflict escalates.

Additional political tensions continue to be felt in the Kurdistan region (KRI) as it tries to hold on to its oil exports and revenues. Earlier this year, the Iraqi federal court ruled unconstitutional an oil and gas law regulating the oil industry in Kurdistan. The Iraqi government has since redoubled its efforts to control the KRI’s oil exports.

Today, fears of being politically undermined have led oil companies operating in Kurdistan to plead with the United States to ease tensions between Iraq’s central government and the semi-autonomous region. The companies believe that intervention is necessary to ensure the stability of oil production between northern Iraq and Turkey. If the flow is interrupted, it could lead Turkey to change its dependence on Russia or Iran for its oil supplies. In addition, the KRI economy could be threatened if it loses oil revenues.

Other concerns are also affecting the country’s oil industry, with fears that a lack of investment in KRI’s oil sector could cut its production in half due to its wells drying up and the need for further exploration in the region. Since the Kurdish Regional Government (KRG) is so heavily dependent on its oil revenues to sustain the region’s economy, a drop in production could be devastating and lead to greater instability in the region. But the outlook is optimistic if the KRI can find more funding, with the potential for a Increase of 580,000 bpd by 2027, with 530,000 available for export, if investments are made. However, without investment, this figure drops to 240,000 bpd available for export.

The combination of political unrest in the Iraqi capital and an intense struggle for the country’s resources, between the Iraqi state and the Kurdistan region, puts the Iraqi oil industry in a volatile position. While the country has to deal with its political situation to ensure the stability of its oil exports, the Kurdistan region is seeking both political and financial support from external powers to ensure the sustainability of its oil industry.

By Felicity Bradstock for Oilprice.com

More reading on Oilprice.com:

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‘Even survival’ of Iraqi state in danger, warns UN mission, as UN chief urges calm and restraint | https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/even-survival-of-iraqi-state-in-danger-warns-un-mission-as-un-chief-urges-calm-and-restraint/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 21:40:35 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/even-survival-of-iraqi-state-in-danger-warns-un-mission-as-un-chief-urges-calm-and-restraint/ In a statement released through his spokesperson Stéphane Dujarric, Secretary General António Guterres, said he was following events “with concern”, as protesters stormed public buildings. Sadr’s alliance won a majority of seats in last October’s general election, but its lawmakers resigned en masse after falling into a stalemate with a rival Shia bloc over the […]]]>

In a statement released through his spokesperson Stéphane Dujarric, Secretary General António Guterres, said he was following events “with concern”, as protesters stormed public buildings.

Sadr’s alliance won a majority of seats in last October’s general election, but its lawmakers resigned en masse after falling into a stalemate with a rival Shia bloc over the appointment of a new prime minister , according to dispatches.

His supporters have camped outside the parliament building for weeks and have already stormed the building to protest the political deadlock and lack of progress.

Several were reportedly killed in Monday’s clashes after supporters stormed the presidential palace.

Immediate de-escalation

Mr. Guterres urged all parties concerned “to take immediate steps to de-escalate the situation” and avoid further violence.

“The Secretary-General urges all parties and all actors to overcome their differences and commit, without further delay, to a a peaceful and inclusive dialogue on a constructive way forward.”

“Extremely dangerous”

Earlier in the day, the United Nations Assistance Mission in Iraq, UNAMI, called on all protesters to leave Baghdad’s international zone immediately, evacuate government buildings and “allow the government to pursue its responsibilities or to lead the state, in the service of the Iraqi people”. .”

UNAMI said the developments mark “an extremely dangerous escalation. State institutions must function unhindered in the service of the Iraqi people, in all circumstances and at all times. Respect for the constitutional order will now prove vital.

“Unstoppable chain of events”

The mission urged all Iraqis to remain peaceful, cooperate with security forces and “refrain from actions that could lead to an unstoppable chain of events”.

UNAMI also calls on all (political) actors to work towards de-escalating tensions and using dialogue as the only way to resolve differences. Iraqis cannot be held hostage to an unpredictable and untenable situation. The very survival of the state is at stake.”

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