Political Division – Milwaukee County First http://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 08:24:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-7-1.png Political Division – Milwaukee County First http://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/ 32 32 Russian Matin Gosloto results: October 7, 2021 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/russian-matin-gosloto-results-october-7-2021/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/russian-matin-gosloto-results-october-7-2021/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 08:15:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/russian-matin-gosloto-results-october-7-2021/ Russia Gosloto’s latest morning results are out, following the last draw on Thursday, October 7, 2021. Gosloto’s Morning Results The winning numbers for the Russia Gosloto draw on Thursday, October 7, 2021 at 10:00 a.m. were: 34, 27, 09, 35, 21, 11 Gosloto Morning Draw Payments Gosloto Russia draw on October 7, 2021 at 10:00 […]]]>

Russia Gosloto’s latest morning results are out, following the last draw on Thursday, October 7, 2021.

Gosloto’s Morning Results

The winning numbers for the Russia Gosloto draw on Thursday, October 7, 2021 at 10:00 a.m. were:

34, 27, 09, 35, 21, 11

Gosloto Morning Draw Payments

Gosloto Russia draw on October 7, 2021 at 10:00 a.m. failed to produce a winner in division one (six correct numbers).

There was zero winners entered in division two (five correct numbers).

Division three (four correct numbers) produced a total of 65 winners, and they each received a cash prize of руб 1500 (R309.97) for their efforts.

Division four (three correct numbers) saw 1037 the winners get the pуб 150 (R31.00) proposed amount.

At the bottom of the paytable, some 6176 the winners were recorded for division five (two correct numbers), and they won 50 р (R10.33) each.

Next Gosloto draw

The next Russian Gosloto jackpot is pуб 40.5 mmillion (R8.3 million) and the next draw will take place on ThusdaySunday, October 7, 2021 at 10:00 PM South African time (which is 11:00 p.m. Moscow time).

Russian Gosloto jackpot winner

The last time the Gosloto 6/45 produced a jackpot winner was Thursday, February 18, 2021. The lucky winner pocketed an amount of 57.9 million p (11.8 million rand).


Source link

]]>
https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/russian-matin-gosloto-results-october-7-2021/feed/ 0
Chilean-American poet describes life in translation https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/chilean-american-poet-describes-life-in-translation/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/chilean-american-poet-describes-life-in-translation/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 18:51:24 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/chilean-american-poet-describes-life-in-translation/ By Monica Jiménez When Mr. Soledad Caballero, AG02, looks back on her childhood, she remembers not one, but two. Born in Santiago, Chile, in 1973, the year a group of military officers seized power from then-President Salvador Allende, Caballero lived there for seven years. “It was my time in Spanish with my family. It feels […]]]>

By Monica Jiménez

When Mr. Soledad Caballero, AG02, looks back on her childhood, she remembers not one, but two.

Born in Santiago, Chile, in 1973, the year a group of military officers seized power from then-President Salvador Allende, Caballero lived there for seven years. “It was my time in Spanish with my family. It feels like a very intimate moment, a momentous moment, ”said Caballero, who teaches, researches and co-directs Allegheny College’s Interdisciplinary Cognitive Humanities Lab with colleague Aimee Knupsky. His first collection of poetry—I was a bell, Benjamin Saltman Poetry Award winner – explores personal and historical memory and her experiences as an immigrant and cancer survivor.

Caballero doesn’t remember much of the political climate of his early years in Chile. She does, however, have vivid memories that recur like movie clips when she experiences certain sensory details. “If I smell musky earth, I remember my grandparents’ beach house. I remember my grandfather coming to pick up my aunt after school.

Caballero’s second childhood began when his family moved to Stillwater, OK. His father obtained a doctorate. in mathematics. Her mother, who had studied ophthalmology, ended up working in retail, then running a home daycare, then doing bilingual customer service. Caballero continued to speak Spanish with her mother, but in school and in all other ways she lived her life in English.

She didn’t think much of her wasted years in Spanish as she earned her BA in English with minors in Women’s Studies and Psychology, and wrote a collection of poems for her undergraduate honors thesis. But things changed as she worked on her Tufts thesis on the travel writings of British romantic women in the Americas, examining how writers brought their own cultural baggage to explore a new place. “I’ve always responded to the idea that you can be an insider in some spaces and a stranger in others,” she said.

The project got Caballero to think more about the role of the United States in Latin America in the 1970s and particularly in the Chilean coup – and who she would have been if her family hadn’t emigrated. Ideas about identity, boundaries and connection continued to creep in when she landed her first teaching position in the English department at Allegheny College and became interested in using the literature to explore a variety of areas, most recently working with a colleague in psychology on the role of empathy in how humans relate to each other.

Caballero and a colleague therefore founded the Cognitive Humanities Lab, where they supervise undergraduates as they apply scientific and literary approaches to the study of emotions, engaging in both experiments and analysis. textual.

Once she got her job and settled into her job at Allegheny, which expanded to include the chair of the Women’s Sexuality Studies program, she wondered: what is the next step? It was then that she rediscovered poetry.

The transition was frightening, but also liberating. “The tropes and textures of an academic article allow you to pretend and mask,” she said. “Poetry feels more vulnerable.”

Themes of heritage and identity began to resurface in his poetry in an unexpected and intimate way. “I always felt I would write about immigrants, who are such powerful but not powerful figures in America, and the family, and the wider political ramifications around the history of the coup. But I just started with stories about my memory, my own family and my relationship with them, ”Caballero said. “It was just a way of asking, who am I now right now with all of my experiences?”

When diagnosed with cancer and embarked on a year of chemotherapy, radiation therapy and surgery, writing poetry became a lifeline, which then became the determination to produce a book. “I just felt like I could have died, and I didn’t,” she said. “Some people don’t. Why am I not trying to do something that I have always wanted to do? ”

To achieve this goal, a year after his last chemotherapy treatment, Caballero took an eight-week trip during his sabbatical in the fall of 2017 and traveled to Santiago. She reconnected with members of her extended family, who opened their homes to her. She read newspapers in Spanish, an effort that was often frustrating and slow.

She spent five memorable days alone in the Atacama Desert and also visited former torture sites run by the regime of Augusto Pinochet, which seized power after the 1973 coup. all this: “I was trying to understand what this space is, what interests me and what I want to see here”.

The result is I was a bell which includes memories of his two childhoods, framed by an adult’s understanding of politics and dictatorship. The poems trace the history of his family and the course of his fight against cancer. “It is about collective, historical and personal memory. It’s about how the body lives through memory and disease as memory in the body, ”she said. “It’s about being an immigrant and exploring my sense of what those years of coup in Chile were like. ”

Caballero’s writing is conversational yet lyrical, mixing English and Spanish, his short sentences containing copious amounts of beauty and pain. The first poem in the collection, “You Have to Leave Me Twice”, begins with an image of ashes sharing between the velatorio (funeral home) and the family mausoleum. Caballero writes:

“There will always be two places.

Siempre hay back. The immigrant

always wears twin shadows. Siempré

esta la sombra. You can’t choose

North, South, English, Spanish.

You can only divide the grief.

Through the writing process and his time in Santiago as an adult, Caballero became aware of his country of birth. “It’s at home, but not at home. The house has different ways of being for me, ”she said. “It’s as much about people as it is space.

These days, Caballero begins work on a new collection of poetry on disease and the medicalization of the body, and tackles the thorny questions of the Cognitive Humanities Lab. “For us now, is thinking about political division and social justice enough? ” she asked. “How do you get someone to do something or become anti-racist? “

As for the question that started it all – about that early childhood lived in Spanish, and what it means – Caballero came up with an answer that, typically for her, relies on a degree of cognitive dissonance. “I don’t know if I identify as Chilean, but I don’t know if I directly identify as American,” she said.

Something she knows for sure. “My way through this space and this world is through language and literature,” she said. “So in a way, it will always be in translation.”

Monica Jimenez can be reached at monica.jimenez@tufts.edu.


Source link

]]>
https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/chilean-american-poet-describes-life-in-translation/feed/ 0
‘SNL’ stumbles over portrayal of Biden | Columns https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/snl-stumbles-over-portrayal-of-biden-columns/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/snl-stumbles-over-portrayal-of-biden-columns/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 04:45:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/snl-stumbles-over-portrayal-of-biden-columns/ Whatever problems the real Joe Biden faces with polls and politics, they are pale in comparison to what the fake Joe Biden characters suffer on “Saturday Night Live”. When the NBC series returned for its 47th season, a new actor named James Austin Johnson attempted to portray Biden. His performance, to be diplomatic, was not […]]]>

Whatever problems the real Joe Biden faces with polls and politics, they are pale in comparison to what the fake Joe Biden characters suffer on “Saturday Night Live”.

When the NBC series returned for its 47th season, a new actor named James Austin Johnson attempted to portray Biden. His performance, to be diplomatic, was not very good. A hairpiece and a hoarse voice don’t make a persuasive parody.

SNL can’t seem to resolve its Biden issue. It’s confusing considering that the series helped invent the kind of mockery of incumbent presidents in 1975. It was the year that President Gerald Ford slipped down the steps of Air Force One, leading to the performance. memorable Ford, an accomplished college athlete and in no way means a klutz, like a bumbler and a stumble. This marked Ford and helped reduce his chances against Jimmy Carter the following year.

Every president since Ford has received the SNL treatment, but no Biden character has clicked. Indeed, the show went on for 255 days without portraying the current president in an opening skit – an unprecedented amount of time, suggesting that either the show can’t feature a good President Biden, or its producers don’t know. how far to go to mock him at a time when the nation is in the throes of political division.

“Broadway is back, and it’s exciting, isn’t it?” Johnson’s Biden said. “The Taliban too. Win some lose.

The lack of humor was compounded by the fact that Johnson didn’t look or sound the part. In Chevy Chase’s day it didn’t matter, but more recent TV impersonators used heavy makeup and facial devices to capture the look of a president, and the best of them nailed down aspects of the mannerism and speech.

It peaked with Donald Trump, the most imitated sitting president since the entire fiscal year began in 1962, with the impersonation of John F. Kennedy by comedian Vaughn Meader.

When Joe Biden was vice president, SNL featured a nifty Jason Sudeikis impersonation. During Biden’s presidential run, Woody Harrelson took a turn, with a toothy, straightforward portrayal of the headlines, followed by the controversial effort of Jim Carrey. Some thought that Carrey, while funny, was not convincing. A few commentators have gone so far as to suggest that Carrey’s character is dangerous as it could hurt Biden’s chances.

After the election, Jim Carrey disappeared from SNL, like almost all attempts to portray President Biden.

Arguably, SNL’s most successful presidential performance was Dana Carvey’s George HW Bush. As with his other characters, Carvey identified unique speech patterns and exaggerated them. But here’s the deal: Carvey is now doing Joe Biden better than anyone, as can be seen in his guest photos with Stephen Colbert. Why doesn’t SNL pay him what he wants to reprise the role?

Last March, President Biden fell on the steps of Air Force One. We know what Chevy Chase and the original SNL writers would have done with it, but the current group didn’t consider it worthy of a sketch. In its pale effort to mock the sitting president, SNL has stumbled ever since.

The Peter Funt column is distributed by the Cagle Cartoons newspaper union.


Source link

]]>
https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/snl-stumbles-over-portrayal-of-biden-columns/feed/ 0
Former Facebook employee claims network harms children and fuels division | Politics https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/former-facebook-employee-claims-network-harms-children-and-fuels-division-politics/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/former-facebook-employee-claims-network-harms-children-and-fuels-division-politics/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 16:51:53 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/former-facebook-employee-claims-network-harms-children-and-fuels-division-politics/ WASHINGTON (AP) – A former Facebook data scientist told Congress on Tuesday that the social media giant’s products are harming children and fueling polarization in the United States as its executives refuse to change because they elevate profits at the expense of security. And she handed the responsibility to the company’s CEO, Mark Zuckerberg. Frances […]]]>

WASHINGTON (AP) – A former Facebook data scientist told Congress on Tuesday that the social media giant’s products are harming children and fueling polarization in the United States as its executives refuse to change because they elevate profits at the expense of security. And she handed the responsibility to the company’s CEO, Mark Zuckerberg.

Frances Haugen testified before the Senate Trade Subcommittee on Consumer Protection. Speaking confidently in an indicted hearing, she accused the company of being aware of the apparent harm done to some teens by Instagram and of being dishonest in its public fight against hate and misinformation.

“Facebook’s products harm children, fuel division and weaken our democracy,” Haugen said. “The company’s management knows how to make Facebook and Instagram safer, but won’t make the necessary changes because they put their astronomical profits ahead of people.”

“Congress action is needed,” she said. “They will not solve this crisis without your help.”

Haugen said the company publicly acknowledged that integrity checks were essential for its systems that drive user engagement, but then turned off some of those checks.

In dialogue with receptive senators on both sides, Haugen, who has focused on algorithmic products in his work at Facebook, explained the importance to the company of algorithms that govern what appears in news feeds from users. She said a 2018 change in the flow of content contributed to more division and ill will in a network apparently created to bring people together.

Despite the enmity the new algorithms were fueling, she said Facebook found they were helping people come back – a model that has helped the social media giant sell more digital ads that generate most of its revenue. .

Senators accepted.

“It has benefited from the spread of disinformation and disinformation and the spread of hate,” said Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., Chairman of the panel. “Facebook’s responses to Facebook’s destructive impact always seem to be more Facebook, we need more Facebook, which means more pain and more money for Facebook. “

Haugen said she believes Facebook is not about creating a destructive platform. But “ultimately the responsibility ends with Mark,” she said, referring to Zuckerberg, who controls more than 50% of Facebook’s voting shares. “There is currently no one holding Mark accountable other than himself.”

Haugen said she believed Zuckerberg was aware of some of the internal research showing concerns about the potential negative impacts of Instagram.

The government must step in with tighter oversight of the company, Haugen said.

Like its fellow tech giants Google, Amazon and Apple, Facebook has benefited from minimal regulation. A number of bipartite legislative proposals for the tech industry deal with data privacy, protection of young people and anti-competitive behavior. But getting new laws passed by Congress is a big task. The Federal Trade Commission recently took a tougher stance on Facebook and other companies.

The subcommittee is examining Facebook’s use of information from its own researchers on Instagram that could indicate potential harm to some of its young users, especially girls, while publicly downplaying negative impacts. For some of the devoted teens to Facebook’s popular photo-sharing platform, the peer pressure generated by visually focused Instagram has resulted in mental health and body image issues, and in some cases, disturbances. diet and suicidal thoughts, research disclosed by Haugen has shown.

An internal study cited 13.5% of teenage girls as saying Instagram made suicidal thoughts worse and 17% of teenage girls saying it made eating disorders worse.

Due to user engagement, Haugen testified, “Facebook knows they drive young users to anorexia content. … It’s like cigarettes. Adolescents have no self-regulation. We must protect the children.

Haugen has passed a broad condemnation of Facebook, backed up by tens of thousands of pages of internal research documents that she secretly copied before quitting her job in the company’s civic integrity unit. She has also filed complaints with federal authorities alleging that Facebook’s own research shows it amplifies hatred, disinformation and political unrest, but the company is hiding what it knows.

“The company intentionally hides vital information from the public, the US government, and governments around the world,” Haugen said. “The documents I have provided to Congress prove that Facebook has repeatedly misled the public about what its own research reveals about child safety, the effectiveness of its artificial intelligence systems, and its role in dissemination of conflicting and extreme messages.

The former employee challenging the social media giant with 2.8 billion users worldwide and nearly $ 1,000 billion in market value is a 37-year-old data expert from Iowa with a degree in computer engineering and holds a master’s degree in commerce from Harvard. Before being hired by Facebook in 2019, she worked for 15 years at technology companies such as Google, Pinterest, and Yelp.

After recent Wall Street Journal articles based on documents she leaked to the newspaper sparked public outcry, Haugen revealed her identity in a CBS “60 Minute” interview that aired Sunday night.

As the public relations debacle over Instagram search escalated over the past week, Facebook suspended work on a kids’ version of Instagram, which the company says is primarily aimed at tweens ages 10 to 10. 12 years.

Haugen said Facebook prematurely deactivated safeguards designed to thwart disinformation and incitement to violence after Joe Biden beat Donald Trump last year, alleging it contributed to the deadly Jan.6 assault on the US Capitol.

After the November election, Facebook disbanded the Civic Integrity Unit where Haugen worked. It was then, she says, that she realized “I don’t believe they’re willing to invest what needs to be invested to keep Facebook from being dangerous. “

Haugen says she told Facebook executives when they recruited her that she wanted to work in an area of ​​the company that combats disinformation because she had lost a friend to online conspiracy theories.

Facebook maintains that Haugen’s claims are misleading and insists that there is no evidence to support the hypothesis that it is the main cause of social polarization.

“Even with the most sophisticated technology, which I believe we are deploying, even with the tens of thousands of people we employ to try to maintain security and integrity on our platform, we are never going to be absolutely at the top of that 100% of the time, ”Facebook vice president of policy and public affairs Nick Clegg said Sunday of CNN’s“ trusted sources ”.

This is because of the “instant and spontaneous form of communication” on Facebook, Clegg said, adding, “I think we are doing more than any reasonable person can expect.”

———

Follow Marcy Gordon on https://twitter.com/mgordonap.



Source link

]]>
https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/former-facebook-employee-claims-network-harms-children-and-fuels-division-politics/feed/ 0
Kansas governor creates children’s defense division https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/kansas-governor-creates-childrens-defense-division/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/kansas-governor-creates-childrens-defense-division/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 22:19:07 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/kansas-governor-creates-childrens-defense-division/ TOPÉKA Kansas is establishing a new office to investigate complaints about the state’s child welfare system and to ensure that the agency governing the system complies with state and federal laws. . Gov. Laura Kelly created the Children’s Advocate’s Division in an executive order Monday – addressing an issue hotly debated in the state legislature […]]]>

Kansas is establishing a new office to investigate complaints about the state’s child welfare system and to ensure that the agency governing the system complies with state and federal laws. .

Gov. Laura Kelly created the Children’s Advocate’s Division in an executive order Monday – addressing an issue hotly debated in the state legislature for years amid reports of poor conditions and abuse to the most vulnerable children in the state.

“(Lawmakers) have never given up on finding a solution to a very big problem,” Kelly said. “As often happens, however, during the legislative process it was difficult to reach consensus and time was running out.”

Kelly said the action would ensure the state “will never again let our child welfare services fail our children so badly.”

Lawmakers have been divided over how to create the office and who should control it. Senate Speaker Ty Masterson said he would continue to use a lawyer overseen by the Attorney General.

“The most important thing is that it’s the Office of Administration (executive branch)… that gives me the biggest break,” said Rep. Susan Humphries, a Republican from Wichita who sponsored a bill that placed the office under the direction of the legislature.

Senator Molly Baumgardner, a Republican from Louisbourg who sponsored the Attorney General Control Bill, said Kelly had failed to create a truly independent office by giving herself the power to appoint counsel.

“It is a total disregard for the legislative process,” she said.

According to the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), about 21 states, including Missouri, have a children’s advocate office or ombudsperson for children. Seven other states have a state ombudsperson who can also work on child protection cases, the NCSL found.

The Kansas office will receive complaints and investigate complaints on behalf of children in the public system.

He will have access to the archives normally closed to the public.

Each year, the Children’s Advocate’s office will issue a “non-partisan and independent” report to the governor, the legislature and the judiciary, Kelly said. These reports will detail the complaints and make recommendations on how to improve the system.

In addition to investigating complaints, the office will oversee the development and implementation of federal, state, and local child protection laws and recommend changes to law and policy in Kansas.

The Office of the Children’s Advocate, according to the decree, will be part of the new Office of the Public Defenders and will be housed in the Department of Administration.

But, according to the ordinance, the secretary of the Ministry of Administration and this body will have no authority over the lawyer.

“It’s about as independent as it gets,” Kelly said.

The Office of Public Advocates will also include existing ombudsmen for KanCare and long-term care facilities. KanCare’s ombudsman previously reported to the Department of Aging and Disability – moving him from that agency has long been a goal of advocates, said Sean Gatewood, a lobbyist and former state official.

Children’s advocates, who have denounced Kansas’ struggling system for years, see it as a victory.

In 2020, the state implemented major reforms as part of a judicial settlement. The regulation mandated the DCF to no longer allow children to spend the night in offices or to be transported from house to house. He demanded that every child receive a mental health exam while in state care.

Even with these changes, advocates felt that an independent office was still needed to provide oversight and advocate for children.

“I commend Governor Kelly for taking steps to ensure that children and families who are affected by the child welfare system have the opportunity to request and access a truly independent oversight process,” said Lori Ross, founder of FosterAdopt Connect and a lifelong child. lawyer in Kansas and Missouri. “Even when things are working the way they should, child protection is still complicated and difficult.

“The lives and futures of Kansas’ most vulnerable children and their families deserve the additional scrutiny this office will provide.”

Beginning in 2017, The Star spent months covering children’s tragedies and identified many missteps of the DCF and the state system to protect children. In the series “Why So Secret, Kansas?” The Star discovered a widespread effort within the DCF to hide behind privacy laws and internal procedures in order to keep the public from knowing how it works.

Representative Jarrod Ousley, a Democrat from Merriam, has since lobbied for the ombudsman’s office. Even Kelly mentioned the lawmaker on Monday. “Jarrod has never let this problem go,” she said.

The executive order created a program similar to that envisioned by Ousley, but placed it under the office of administration rather than the legislature and made the lawyer appointed to the post of governor.

“I would prefer Bill 2345 to be enacted here today, but if the leadership of the Legislature wants to get into politics with children, I’m happy to see the Governor take matters into his own hands and prioritize to children, ”Ousley said.

During the last session, Ousley believed that the office of the children’s advocate was finally going to exist. A bipartisan group of lawmakers sponsored the bill and passed it out of committee. But the House leadership did not allow the measure to get a debate on the floor.

At that point, Ousley said that no one could explain to him why. Next, a Senate version of the bill was introduced that saw the ombudsman be governed by the Kansas attorney general, an elected position currently held by gubernatorial candidate Derek Schmidt.

While Senate Republicans argued the placement would remove politics from the office, opponents said Schmidt’s ambition for a higher post would make the ombudsman a political tool. Schmidt is now considered the alleged candidate for the Republican nomination to face Kelly next year after former Gov. Jeff Colyer left the race last month.

In a statement, Masterson, the Speaker of the Senate, said he would continue to pursue this version of the bill.

“While I appreciate that the governor has followed the lead of the Senate in recognizing the need for an office of the children’s advocate, it is important that the office be independent and provide effective oversight,” said Masterson.

The Senate version of the bill was passed by the Senate this year, but was not put to a vote in the House.

Kansas Appleseed has worked with Ousley for the past four years to secure a child advocate’s office in the state. Mike Fonkert said he and other members of the nonprofit were “very sad that the legislature did not cross the finish line on a bill in the last session.”

But he, along with lawyers and lawmakers, said Kelly’s order is a critical step toward securing that independent accountability that the Kansas child welfare system has needed for years.

“I think the message is that people care,” said Fonkert, campaign manager for Just from Kansas Appleseed. “There are a lot of state leaders and legislators who are invested in making sure children and families get the responsibility, oversight and, ultimately, the services they deserve. ”

The goal of this next session, Fonkert said, is to work with lawmakers to make the office even stronger and more permanent, even if another governor repeals the decree.

“The governor did a lot of heavy lifting today,” Fonkert said. “We look forward to working with the Legislature to put a bow on this.”

This story was originally published October 4, 2021 5:19 pm.

Kansas City Star Related Stories

Katie Bernard covers the Kansas Legislature and State Government for the Kansas City Star. She joined The Star as a late-breaking journalist in May 2019 before joining the political team in December 2020. Katie studied journalism and political science at the University of Kansas.


Source link

]]>
https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/kansas-governor-creates-childrens-defense-division/feed/ 0
Why the Richmond man has waited until now to get the vaccine https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/why-the-richmond-man-has-waited-until-now-to-get-the-vaccine/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/why-the-richmond-man-has-waited-until-now-to-get-the-vaccine/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 01:32:55 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/why-the-richmond-man-has-waited-until-now-to-get-the-vaccine/ RICHMOND, Virginia – As the COVID-19 pandemic rages on, vaccine status is becoming more prevalent in people’s daily lives. Some companies require proof of vaccination from customers, employers have required vaccine for workers, and vaccination status can even be found on dating profiles. But those who hesitate to roll up their sleeves worry. Many feel […]]]>

RICHMOND, Virginia – As the COVID-19 pandemic rages on, vaccine status is becoming more prevalent in people’s daily lives. Some companies require proof of vaccination from customers, employers have required vaccine for workers, and vaccination status can even be found on dating profiles.

But those who hesitate to roll up their sleeves worry. Many feel that immunization status is becoming a form of identity and some say they feel stigmatized because they need more time to think through their decision.

“I will be getting my second injection this Wednesday,” Hunter McAnney said of his COVID-19 vaccine. After that, he will join the 5.1 million Virginians who are fully vaccinated against COVID-19.

“I was like, you know what? I’ll take a chance,” McAnney said. “It’s not going to be that bad.”

It took the 22-year-old man from Richmond nine months to decide he was comfortable getting the shot. His choice came behind a majority of Commonwealth adults eligible for the vaccine. 72% of 18+ in Virginia have already taken this step.

But McAnney said the road to his decision unfortunately came with judgment, pressure and even hostility at times from the public, social media, government leaders and others around him.

“I feel like people made me believe that if I didn’t understand, I didn’t care,” he said.

WTVR

Hunter McAnney

RELATED: County-by-County Review of COVID-19 Cases in Virginia; which areas had the biggest peaks last week

It’s a feeling he explained couldn’t be further from the truth. In fact, McAnney has said he wants more time to understand and analyze the facts, the science, the side effects and how his friends and family have been affected. He said the political division surrounding the vaccine hadn’t helped either.

“I think it was a political, a little partisan thing that made me feel weird about it, and it wasn’t even that I didn’t trust science,” McAnney said. “I would never think in a million years that a medical doctrine, or whatever you want to call it, would somehow become a political agenda.”

During his decision-making process, he wished there had been more conversations about the safety and effectiveness of the vaccine.

“No one has ever really taken the time to have a real talk about how the vaccine is actually good for you and what you should do,” he said.

Dr Jeanine Guidry

WTVR

Dr Jeanine Guidry

Dr Jeanine Guidry, assistant professor at the Robertson School of Media and Culture at Virginia Commonwealth University, suggests a softer approach to conversations with unvaccinated people.

“See the human side of everyone,” she said. “Communicate as human beings. Say, “I understand, I understand that you are afraid”.

However, Dr Guidry said she understands why people who are immune could be frustrated by people who are not, given that the COVID-19 pandemic is now the deadliest in American history.

“I think it’s hard to see people making decisions that we know won’t protect them, and we know won’t protect those around them,” Guidry said. She also explained that some people, especially healthcare workers and other essential workers, are exhausted and are waiting for vaccines to improve our situation faster.

While pandemics and vaccines are not new concepts, she said there is one notable difference between COVID-19 and pandemics of the past: social media, which is a producer of disinformation.

“It’s really hard to correct misinformation once we as humans have accepted it,” she said. “And it has nothing to do with vaccines, it has to do with how we handle information.”

Social media

TO FILE

Social media

Guidry also explained that digital spaces don’t always offer the best opportunities for productive dialogue.

“If you’re going to have a conversation with someone about the COVID vaccine, try having it offline or try having it in person or over the phone,” she said. “If someone is anti-vaccine, if someone decides not to get the vaccine, don’t close the door. They can come back with questions, and they can be open to a different decision in a few months.”

As these conversations continue, McAnney encourages everyone to be understanding.

“I feel like it should be a safe environment and not under pressure. Because overall it just feels very tense, and I just want it to be more relaxed, “he said.

MassVaccinationClinicRichmondRaceway.jpg

WTVR

COVID-19 Mass Vaccination Clinic at Richmond Raceway.

Virginians aged 12 and over are eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine. Pre-registration is no longer necessary, so go to Vaccine research to search for specific vaccines available near you or call 877-VAX-IN-VA (877-275-8343).

Count on CBS 6 News and WTVR.com for the most comprehensive coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Have you been fully vaccinated?

People are considered to be fully vaccinated:

  • 2 weeks after their second dose in a series of 2 doses, such as Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, or
  • 2 weeks after a single dose vaccine, such as the Johnson & Johnson Janssen vaccine
VDHCompletelyVaccinated0423.jpg

Virginia Department of Health

What you can and should not do after you have been fully immunized.

How to Protect Yourself and Others When You Have Been Fully Immunized

COVID-19 vaccines are effective in protecting you against the disease. Based on what we know Regarding COVID-19 vaccines, people who have been fully vaccinated may start to do certain things that they had stopped doing due to the pandemic.

We are still learning how vaccines will affect the spread of COVID-19. After you have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, you should continue to take precautions– like wearing a mask, staying 6 feet from others, and avoiding crowds and poorly ventilated spaces – in public places until we know more.

These recommendations can help you make decisions about your daily activities after you are fully immunized. They are not intended for care settings.

Click here for more information from the Virginia Department of Health.


Source link

]]>
https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/why-the-richmond-man-has-waited-until-now-to-get-the-vaccine/feed/ 0
Oct 3 Letters to the Editor, Part 3: Opinions from our readers | Opinion https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/oct-3-letters-to-the-editor-part-3-opinions-from-our-readers-opinion/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/oct-3-letters-to-the-editor-part-3-opinions-from-our-readers-opinion/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/oct-3-letters-to-the-editor-part-3-opinions-from-our-readers-opinion/ ‘Normal’ wasn’t that great There is a lot of talk of returning to “normal” once the COVID-19 virus is under control. Do we really want the same old same old or do we want change? The old normality consisted of stagnant wages, a high cost of living, economic gains of up to the richest 10%, […]]]>

‘Normal’ wasn’t that great

There is a lot of talk of returning to “normal” once the COVID-19 virus is under control. Do we really want the same old same old or do we want change?

The old normality consisted of stagnant wages, a high cost of living, economic gains of up to the richest 10%, tax cuts for the rich, tax loopholes for businesses, 40 years of safety nets. shredded security systems, a very expensive for-profit healthcare system, lack of mental health care, large sums of money spent on elections, high cost of education, police brutality, white supremacy and ignorance of the devastating effects of change climate.

Do we really want this to continue or do we want the freedom and justice that would come with change?

Do we want to continue capitalist socialism, which only supports the richest among us, or a more just and equitable democratic social system which supports all of us?

The United Nations should have doubts about removing the dam on the lower Snake River and devoting its resources and efforts to restoring the fish.

Why don’t they buy or lease Washington State’s Ringold Fish Hatchery on the Columbia River near Pasco – and start raising millions of salmon and rainbow trout sky towards their Salmon Orca project?

The hatchery has now been closed for five years. Why?

A few people say it’s because Washington spends more money on protecting wolves than on producing fish.

What hypocrisy when a chief of the Nez Perce tribe says that due to a lack of fish, “our people, our culture and our way of life are in danger of extinction.”

If the tribe is so concerned about the changes in their way of life, why would they consider removing the lifeblood of the river system when there is absolutely no scientific evidence – only opinions – that removing the dam bring back more fish?

If they are so concerned about removing the dams, why don’t they start with the Bonneville dam and just remove one dam that was built in 1938 and see the results?

Fish that are eaten by the hundreds of sea lions who feed on thousands of fish that are trapped trying to cross the dam. …

Retired biologist John McKern was right when he said that blaming the lower Snake River dams for salmon status is like blaming the straw that broke the camel’s back.

I am excited to vote for my friend and neighbor, Julia Parker, for the Moscow City Council.

Having lived in Moscow long enough to see our city government go through growing pains in recent years, I think Parker is just what our city needs at this point in its long and generally quiet history. She describes herself as a pragmatic progressive. I find this concept not to be a contradiction but rather a challenge. The progressive values ​​that Parker has lived through the many years that I have known her are conservative values ​​in the authentic sense: community, sustainability and personal freedom informed by education, science and fact. These are values ​​shared by an overwhelming majority of Idahoans, along with an ethical commitment and investment in our children, grandchildren and generations beyond.

Parker has lived in Moscow for over 20 years and has raised and educated four children there, in partnership with our public schools. She taught at the University of Idaho and most recently worked as a geriatric nurse with older patients, a job that I respect tremendously.

In this age of climate change, COVID-19 and political divisiveness, Parker will not be demagogic or speaking out, but rather will help his fellow citizens understand complex problems and find sensible and practical solutions.

It will bring that same sane mindset to the issues of multimodal transportation, affordable housing, water use and conservation, and economic development that preserve and improve the quality of life of our city and the surrounding regional community. .


Source link

]]>
https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/oct-3-letters-to-the-editor-part-3-opinions-from-our-readers-opinion/feed/ 0
Biden Says ‘Everyone Is Frustrated’ As Agenda Stalls In Congress Amid Dem Division https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/biden-says-everyone-is-frustrated-as-agenda-stalls-in-congress-amid-dem-division/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/biden-says-everyone-is-frustrated-as-agenda-stalls-in-congress-amid-dem-division/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 14:27:17 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/biden-says-everyone-is-frustrated-as-agenda-stalls-in-congress-amid-dem-division/ President Biden told reporters on Saturday that “everyone is frustrated” after two huge bills in Congress were blocked, as well as an increase in the debt limit, amid infighting between a divided Democratic caucus . “Everyone is frustrated, it’s part of being in government, of being frustrated,” Biden told reporters on the White House lawn. […]]]>

President Biden told reporters on Saturday that “everyone is frustrated” after two huge bills in Congress were blocked, as well as an increase in the debt limit, amid infighting between a divided Democratic caucus .

“Everyone is frustrated, it’s part of being in government, of being frustrated,” Biden told reporters on the White House lawn.

PELOSI SAYS “IT TAKES MORE TIME” AFTER ADMITTING LOSS ON INFRASTRUCTURE BILL: LIVE UPDATES

Biden spoke to reporters on his way to Delaware for the weekend after left-wing Democrats decided to defeat the passage of a bipartisan $ 1,000 billion bill on infrastructure if it were passed before a separate $ 3.5 trillion budget reconciliation bill filled with left-wing priorities. social spending and climate change, as well as significant tax increases for the richest Americans.

The latter bill would have been brought forward using the budget reconciliation process, meaning it would only need 50 votes in the Senate, and therefore avoid Republican obstruction. However, each of the Senate’s 50 Democrats would have to be on board.

That unit looked questionable this week amid objections to the sky-high price tag from moderate Democrats, including Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., And Joe Manchin, W-Va., Looking to push the price down. Without their support, the legislation is likely dead when it came to the Senate, as the bill is not designed to garner the support of Republicans.

But Progressive Democrats refused to support the infrastructure bill until there is agreement on the massive reconciliation package, meaning it wouldn’t have the votes to pass the House. .

The booming bills was the latest sign of the political struggles Democrats face with a 50-50 Senate and an extremely slim majority in the House.

COULD MCAULIFFE’S RACE FOR THE GOVERNOR OF VIRGINIA BE RESERVOIR BY THE CASTING OF THE APPROVAL OF BIDEN, THE INFRASTRUCTURE OF DEMS COMBAT?

“Although great progress has been made in negotiations to craft an agreement between the House, Senate and White House on the Build Back Better Act, more time is needed to complete the task,” wrote the president of House Nancy Pelosi in a letter to House Dems, referring to the $ 3.5 trillion bill. “Our priority of creating jobs in the areas of health, family and the climate is a shared value. Our Chairs always work for clarity and consensus. Obviously, the bipartisan infrastructure bill will be passed once we get agreement on the reconciliation bill. “

Biden met Democrats on Capitol Hill on Friday in what Fox News said was an effort to bring down the temperature between the two wings. Biden reportedly told Democrats they did not have the votes to pass the infrastructure bill.

On Saturday, Biden vowed to “work like hell” to pass the bills.

“I support them both. And I think we can do them both,” he said.

JAYAPAL SAYS PROGRESSIVE WILL REDUCE EXPENDITURE DEMAND BY $ 3.5 T

On Saturday, the White House also released a statement saying that Biden walked out of a meeting with the Democrats in the caucus on Friday “with the firm belief that there was a shared commitment of the entire Democratic caucus to serving the American people.”

“The president and his team will continue to be in close contact with members of the House and Senate throughout the weekend,” White House press secretary Jen Psaki said. “And he looks forward not only to welcoming MPs to the White House next week, but also to travel the country to defend his bold and ambitious agenda.

Separately, Democrats are scrambling to raise the debt ceiling, as the country’s debt continues to rise amid a massive spending spree in Washington, and faces an Oct. 18 deadline for the to do. Biden said on Saturday that failure by Republicans to agree to lift the limit would be “unacceptable.”

“Well, I hope the Republicans aren’t irresponsible enough to refuse to raise the debt ceiling – that would be totally unreasonable,” Biden said.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

But Republicans have targeted Democrats for “failing” in their legislative efforts.

“It’s official. The Democrats have failed,” Republican Review Committee chairman Jim Banks, R-Va., Said in a statement.

“This week their chance was to push through an infrastructure deal and a massive spending bill through reconciliation and they couldn’t do it because their party was taken over by radicals.”

Fox News’ Chad Pergram and Kyle Morris contributed to this report.


Source link

]]>
https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/biden-says-everyone-is-frustrated-as-agenda-stalls-in-congress-amid-dem-division/feed/ 0
Poll to support political split in the United States https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/poll-to-support-political-split-in-the-united-states/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/poll-to-support-political-split-in-the-united-states/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 22:58:06 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/poll-to-support-political-split-in-the-united-states/ (NEXSTAR) – More than half of Trump’s voters (52%) and 41% of Biden voters have expressed support for the country’s divide along political lines, according to a new poll from the Center for Politics at the University of Virginia. The AVU Center for Politics has partnered with Project Home Fire, a group working for common […]]]>

(NEXSTAR) – More than half of Trump’s voters (52%) and 41% of Biden voters have expressed support for the country’s divide along political lines, according to a new poll from the Center for Politics at the University of Virginia.

The AVU Center for Politics has partnered with Project Home Fire, a group working for common ground in US politics, to find out just how deep our divisions run. The poll consisted of 300 questions asked of 1,001 Trump voters and 1,011 Biden voters (margin of error +/- 2.2%).

The poll asked people to respond on a sliding scale based on whether they agree with different statements, including: “The situation in America is such that I would favor [Blue/Red] States seceding from the union to form their own separate country.

Responses supporting the idea of ​​forming two new countries out of red and blue states ranged from “at least somewhat agree” to “strongly agree”.

“The rift between Trump and Biden voters is deep, wide and dangerous,” said Larry J. Sabato, director of the UVA Center for Politics. “The reach is unprecedented, and it will not be easily corrected. “

The poll results revealed widespread distrust on both sides of the political spectrum of “voters, elected officials, and media sources they associated with the other side,” and about two in 10 Trump and Biden voters. strongly agreed when it came to the idea of ​​a president bypassing Congress or the courts to “take the necessary steps.”

The rigid differences between political supporters in this country are not lost on the voters themselves. A June poll from Georgetown University Institute of Politics and Public Service found voters view political divide as the number one issue facing the United States, beating the COVID-19 pandemic, health care and economic woes.

Because each state is home to voters of different political persuasions, it is not clear how secession by politics would work in practice, but the suggestion hints at the 1861 secession of 11 southern states which led to civil war and the death of approximately 620,000 Americans.

The results of the latest poll, however, are not entirely hopeless. Both groups of voters strongly supported several goals of the bipartisan infrastructure and reconciliation bills currently under consideration in Congress, such as improving the electricity grid, modernizing drinking water systems and investing in roads, bridges and other types of “hard infrastructure”.

“In order to find ways to bridge these divisions, we need to understand not only the divisions themselves, but also understand the ways in which we can, together, move forward to reach common ground. This project helps us do both, ”said Larry Schack of Project Home Fire.

The drafters say they hope their work will also identify “compromise-receptive” subgroups among Trump and Biden voters who may be able to help build bridges between the two factions.

“Simply put, we need a real plan to heal our fractured democracy,” Schack said.


Source link

]]>
https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/poll-to-support-political-split-in-the-united-states/feed/ 0
Goa, witness to political carnival, says Sena’s Raut after TMC AAP enters poll fray https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/goa-witness-to-political-carnival-says-senas-raut-after-tmc-aap-enters-poll-fray/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/goa-witness-to-political-carnival-says-senas-raut-after-tmc-aap-enters-poll-fray/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 10:43:21 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/goa-witness-to-political-carnival-says-senas-raut-after-tmc-aap-enters-poll-fray/ Panaji, Oct 1 (PTI) With the Trinamool Congress (TMC) and the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) throwing their hats in Goa's Assembly poll ring, Shiv Sena leader Sanjay Raut on Friday said the state was currently witnessing a "political carnival".<br> Addressing a press conference, Raut also announced that his party would contest 22 to 25 seats […]]]>
     Panaji, Oct 1 (PTI) With the Trinamool Congress (TMC) and the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) throwing their hats in Goa's Assembly poll ring, Shiv Sena leader Sanjay Raut on Friday said the state was currently witnessing a "political carnival".<br>        Addressing a press conference, Raut also announced that his party would contest 22 to 25 seats in Goa without forging any pre-poll alliance, and added that if voted to power, his party would shut down the casinos in the state. <br>        Election to the 40-member Goa Assembly is due in February next year. The state is currently being ruled by the BJP, while the Congress sits in the opposition. <br>        "I have heard that TMC is also fighting the polls in Goa. The political parties from Delhi and West Bengal are contesting in Goa. So many leaders are switching sides. What we are currently witnessing in Goa is a political carnival," the Rajya Sabha member said.<br>        He claimed that the Shiv Sena, which is from neighbouring Maharashtra, has a strong base in Goa where it has been present for over two decades. <br>        "We are emotionally and culturally connected to Goa," Raut said. <br>        When asked about the possibility of his party's alliance with the NCP and the Congress in Goa, as happened in his home state, the Sena leader said, "The politics of Maharashtra is different from that of Goa."<br>        He asserted that the Sena's move of contesting on its own will not cause any division of opposition votes. "We have our own base and we are sure to win on majority seats with it," he said.<br>        Raut said his party has taken up several issues in Goa, including the demand to reduce the duty hours of women police staff in the state. <br>        Goa's former Congress MLA Luizinho Faleiro, who has joined the TMC, on Thursday announced that the Mamata Banerjee-led party plans to contest all 40 seats in Goa on its own. <br>        The AAP has already thrown its hat in the ring ahead of the polls, with the party's national convener and Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal announcing free power up to 300 units per month and 80 per cent jobs for locals if his party is voted to power.<br>        In the last Assembly polls, the Congress had won the highest number of 17 seats, restricting the BJP to 13 seats. However, surprising the Congress, the saffron party allied with regional parties and formed government under the leadership of senior leader Manohar Parrikar. PTI RPS <br>NP   NP


Source link

]]>
https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/goa-witness-to-political-carnival-says-senas-raut-after-tmc-aap-enters-poll-fray/feed/ 0