Political Admin – Milwaukee County First http://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 21:50:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-7-1.png Political Admin – Milwaukee County First http://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/ 32 32 MSU’s Shoup urges Americans to ‘love each other’, nation at Constitution Day conference https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/msus-shoup-urges-americans-to-love-each-other-nation-at-constitution-day-conference/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 21:50:27 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/msus-shoup-urges-americans-to-love-each-other-nation-at-constitution-day-conference/ Contact person: Carl Smith Brian Shoup, professor and head of the Mississippi State Department of Political Science and Public Administration, details the factors that led to the recent decline in trust in governance during his Constitution Day lecture at the Colvard Student Union Fowlkes Auditorium. (Photo by Megan Bean) STARKVILLE, Mississippi—At a time of divisive […]]]>

Contact person: Carl Smith

Brian Shoup, professor and head of the Mississippi State Department of Political Science and Public Administration, details the factors that led to the recent decline in trust in governance during his Constitution Day lecture at the Colvard Student Union Fowlkes Auditorium. (Photo by Megan Bean)

STARKVILLE, Mississippi—At a time of divisive culture wars, distrust of government, and political uncertainty, Brian Shoup, professor and head of the Mississippi State Department of Political Science and Public Administration, said that Americans can do two things to ensure the continuity of the republic: love each other and love your country.

Shoup’s advice came on Monday [Sept. 19] Lamar Conerly Conference of the Forum on Governance “What is a Republic? during which the university celebrated Constitution Day, the signing of the U.S. Constitution on September 17, 1787 – 12 years after the infamous ‘gunshot heard around the world’ began the American Revolutionary War and 11 years after the Second Continental Congress issued the Declaration of Independence.

In his lecture, Shoup noted the decline in public support and trust in democratic governance around the world, highlighted by a 2020-21 AmericasBarometer survey in which only 63% of respondents indicated support for democracy. in the face of the rise of authoritarian populist rulers in Hungary, India. , Turkey, the Philippines and other countries.

Many factors, from income inequality to abandonment issues resulting from years of population migration from rural environments to dense urban centers, have led to the erosion of trust in American governance, Shoup said. , but perhaps the most influential is affective polarization. These divisions based on internal feelings and ideology, as opposed to specific issues, have placed Americans in different camps where many “don’t like who [they] vote for but hate who [they] vote against,” he said, just to defeat the perceived existential threat posed by the opposition. This shift to extremes has made political discourse more difficult, he said, even though many Americans don’t have wildly different views on many issues.

“When people think that participatory politics actively hurts them — and if they believe that the free-market principles that we generally attach to our forms of constitutional republics actively hurt them — they won’t support them,” Shoup said. “It turns out that when you ask people who claim to be from opposing ideological camps about their attitudes on many issues, they actually don’t disagree that much.”

Cultures with thriving democratic republics, Shoup said, have strong civic virtues in which individuals recognize their obligations to society, healthy rhetorical cultures open to debate and discussion, loyalty to truth, and citizens who follow. the spirit of the law instead of looking for loopholes in the game. the system to their advantage or to the detriment of others.

Shoup asked attendees to respect and reflect on American government institutions in light of Constitution Day.

“The history of the United States has not always been entirely fair, free, or just, but I hope we can see ourselves as an ambitious society that is committed to making universal and equitably respected those very precious freedoms that we have been given. In doing so, we have something very beautiful and I think it’s a remarkable experience,” he said. “In order for us to support the work as experimenters, we have to ensure that it achieves these fruitful objectives.”

Sponsored by MSU’s College of Arts and Sciences, the PSPA Department, and the Lamar Conerly Governance Forum, Shoup’s presentation was part of MSU’s Conerly Governance Lecture Series. The lecture series is made possible with major support from Conerly, an accounting/pre-law graduate of MSU in 1971 and longtime partner of the law firm Destin, Florida, Conerly, Bowman and Dykes LLP. He is both a past president of the MSU National Alumni Association and a past member of the College of Business Alumni.

To learn more about MSU’s College of Arts and Sciences and the PSPA department, visit www.cas.msstate.edu and www.pspa.msstate.edurespectively.

MSU is the main university in Mississippi, available online at www.msstate.edu.

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Biden administration quietly steps up efforts to shut down Guantanamo https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/biden-administration-quietly-steps-up-efforts-to-shut-down-guantanamo/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/biden-administration-quietly-steps-up-efforts-to-shut-down-guantanamo/ WASHINGTON — The Biden administration is revamping its efforts to close the Guantanamo Bay prison, for the first time appointing a senior diplomat to oversee detainee transfers and signaling it will not interfere with plea negotiations that could resolve the stalled prosecution of alleged 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and four co-defendants. After taking a […]]]>

WASHINGTON — The Biden administration is revamping its efforts to close the Guantanamo Bay prison, for the first time appointing a senior diplomat to oversee detainee transfers and signaling it will not interfere with plea negotiations that could resolve the stalled prosecution of alleged 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and four co-defendants.

After taking a low-key approach to the issue during his first year in office to avoid political controversy, President Biden is one step closer to fulfilling a campaign promise to close the facility, people familiar with the matter said.

The US Navy Base Cuba facility was established in January 2002 to house suspected foreign terrorists captured overseas. Guantanamo has detained nearly 800 men since then; only 36 inmates remain at the facility today, after hundreds were sent home or resettled to third countries by the administrations of George W. Bush and Barack Obama. The new detainee arrived in 2008; some of the men have been detained for two decades.

Nine of the remaining detainees are defendants in the military commission proceedings, including five charged with conspiracy, murder contrary to the laws of war, hijacking or endangering a ship or aircraft, and terrorism in the 9/11 affair.

President Biden, who has so far taken a low-key approach to Guantanamo, spoke at a 9/11 memorial ceremony at the Pentagon this month.


Photo:

Andrew Harnik/Associated Press

Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri was charged with perfidy, murder in violation of the laws of war, terrorism, conspiracy and endangering a ship by planning attacks on three ships, including the bombing of the 2000 bombing of the USS Cole which killed 17 sailors.

Three other detainees were sentenced by military commissions, two of them via plea bargains. One of them, Abd al-Hadi al Iraqi, has pleaded guilty to conspiracy and violating the laws of war and is awaiting sentencing. A second, Ali Hamza al-Bahlul, is serving a life sentence for providing material support for terrorism, solicitation and conspiracy. A third, Majid Khan, reached an agreement with prosecutors to plead guilty to conspiracy, murder in violation of the laws of war, attempted murder in violation of the laws of war and espionage, and became a cooperator government and served his sentence in March.

Four people are being held indefinitely without charge because authorities consider them a security risk. Twenty other people were cleared for transfer by a review board including defense, intelligence and law enforcement officials, but moving the men proved more difficult than the Biden team expected. , the sources said.

Some critics of the Biden administration’s action on the prison closure, both inside and outside the administration, say new crises have kept national security personnel busy and the potential to be branded soft on terrorism has slowed the administration’s efforts, they say.

The White House is seeking to avoid the kind of backlash that thwarted Mr. Obama’s plans after his high-profile calls to close the prison. Congress responded to the Obama administration’s efforts to close the prison in 2010 by passing a ban on the transfer of Guantanamo detainees to the United States

“The administration does not want to appear to be soft on terrorism and is waiting for political consensus,” said Harvey Rishikof, a former head of the military commissions apparatus who helped write a recent report on the closure of the University of Pennsylvania facility. Center for Ethics and the Rule of Law.

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS

Should the United States close Guantanamo Bay, and if so, how? Join the conversation below.

Mr. Biden’s new special representative post, critics also say, lacks the influence of similar offices under the Obama administration, where Guantanamo envoys had direct access to the secretary of state. The new Special Representative, Tina Kaidanow, a former Goodwill Ambassador for Counterterrorism, has been placed lower in the State Department hierarchy, they say.

A State Department spokesperson said Ms Kaidanow was unavailable for comment.

The Department of Defense is moving forward with a Donald Trump-era project to build a third courtroom at Guantanamo Bay at a cost of $4 million, although no additional trials are expected. planned at the naval base.

A spokesman for the military commissions said “a significant expansion” of Guantanamo’s trial facilities, including a new courtroom, would allow military judges to hold “lengthy concurrent trials of multiple defendants”.

Democratic Senator Dick Durbin said: “Detaining people without charge or trial for years cannot be reconciled with the values ​​we espouse as a nation.”


Photo:

Al Drago/Bloomberg News

Twenty-one years after the September 11, 2001 attacks — and a year after the United States withdrew from Afghanistan — critics are pushing the administration to speed up the closure of the offshore prison.

“Detaining people without charge or trial for years cannot be reconciled with the values ​​we stand for as a nation and has deprived 9/11 victims and their families of any semblance of justice or closure,” the president said. of the Senate Judiciary Committee, Dick. Durbin (D., Ill.).

Some Republican lawmakers, meanwhile, have opposed any action that might lead to detainees leaving Guantanamo. “The Biden administration wants to release more terrorists, and we know with absolute metaphysical certainty that the results will be more Americans murdered,” Sen. Ted Cruz (R., Texas) said in December during a Judiciary Committee hearing. on Guantanamo.

The Penn Research Center released a 197-page report on Monday providing a roadmap for closing the facility, while offering alternative approaches to protect national security. Written by national security experts, including former military prosecutors and Guantanamo defense attorneys, the report recommends abolishing military commissions, created to try enemy prisoners without granting them constitutional rights, and resolving the 10 pending trials by plea bargains that could lead to life imprisonment for some defendants rather than execution.

He advocates a more vigorous campaign to repatriate or resettle detainees abroad and the repeal of congressional restrictions on the transfer of detainees serving sentences at Guantanamo to prisons on US soil.

Settlement in Cuba costs $540 million a year to operate, according to the Penn study, including about $100 million for military commissions. That works out to $15 million per inmate, compared to about $78,000 a year for an inmate at the US Penitentiary in Florence, Colorado, where terrorists and other high-security convicts are held.

The Bush administration transferred more than 500 Guantanamo detainees before 2009; the Obama administration transferred nearly 200 more. Only one transfer, which had been negotiated during the Obama era, took place during the Trump administration. Forty detainees remained at Guantanamo when Mr. Biden took office.

Mr. Biden has long called for the facility to be closed, including during his 2020 presidential campaign. Yet Mr. Biden left in place Mr. Trump’s 2018 executive order revoking Mr. Obama to shut down the facility. The White House also did not initially restore the post of Guantanamo envoy. When Mr. Durbin held a Judiciary Committee hearing on Guantanamo in December, the administration refused to send anyone to explain its position.

The 9/11 prosecution has been bogged down for years by the cruel methods used by Central Intelligence Agency interrogators before the defendants were charged. In 2017, Mr. Rishikof, then head of the commissions, began negotiations with 9/11 defendants that could have led to guilty pleas had executions not been considered.

The Trump administration removed Mr. Rishikof from his post for what it said were unrelated reasons. Earlier this year, the Biden administration renewed those negotiations and the White House said it would not interfere.

“Obviously, if it was easy — four presidents, 20 years — we would have figured that out,” Sen. John Cornyn (R., Texas) said at the December hearing.

Write to Jess Bravin at jess.bravin+1@wsj.com

Copyright ©2022 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All rights reserved. 87990cbe856818d5eddac44c7b1cdeb8

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Cruel or harmless? Pastors mixed on GOP migrant transports https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/cruel-or-harmless-pastors-mixed-on-gop-migrant-transports/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 21:51:48 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/cruel-or-harmless-pastors-mixed-on-gop-migrant-transports/ As Republican Governors are stepping up their high-profile migrant transports to Democratic-run jurisdictions, the practice is drawing a mixed reaction from Christian religious leaders — many of whom, especially evangelicals, backed GOP candidates in recent elections in large numbers. Some describe these actions as inhumane exploitation of vulnerable people for political gain, while others say […]]]>

As Republican Governors are stepping up their high-profile migrant transports to Democratic-run jurisdictions, the practice is drawing a mixed reaction from Christian religious leaders — many of whom, especially evangelicals, backed GOP candidates in recent elections in large numbers.

Some describe these actions as inhumane exploitation of vulnerable people for political gain, while others say it is a harmless way to draw attention to the impact of immigration on the states close to the southern border.

“Playing political games scores points — and the hypocrisy of the current immigration system is easy to point out,” said Ed Stetzer, professor, dean and executive director of Wheaton College Billy Graham Center in Illinois, in a communicated.

“However, this does not solve the real problems. … Let’s fix the system,” he added, “and stop turning people into pawns of political one-upmanship.”

But the Reverend Robert Jeffress, senior pastor of First Baptist Church in Dallas and a prominent supporter of former President Donald Trump, who imposed restrictive immigration policies while in office, backed the transportation.

Government officials who refuse to fulfill their biblical responsibility to protect our borders should be made to feel the effects of their lawless policies,” Jeffress said via email.

“Sending illegal migrants by bus to Washington DC or Martha’s Vineyard is not exactly the same as sending them to Siberia,” he continued. “Most Americans would like the opportunity to visit either destination.”

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis flew immigrants on two planes to the upscale island of Martha’s Vineyard in Massachusetts on Wednesday, while Texas Governor Greg Abbott also sent migrants to towns with mayors democrats. Most recently, on Thursday, two whole buses from his state landed near the residence of Vice President Kamala Harris in Washington. Arizona Governor Doug Ducey also embraced the policy.

Republican governors are trying to draw attention to what they claim was a failure border policy under the Biden administration.

Brent Leatherwood, chairman of the Southern Baptist Convention’s public policy agency, the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, said such actions “seem to be more of a public relations issue.”

“We have long called for stronger border protections and at the same time (for) people who come to this country to be treated in a way that respects the imago dei (image of God),” he said.

Most Americans, including Southern Baptists, “want a solution to our broken immigration system,” Leatherwood added. “Let’s reduce some of these actions and instead come to the table and find a solution that truly respects human dignity.”

Joshua Manning, pastor of Community Baptist Church in Noel, Missouri, a town of 1,800 with a large immigrant population, agreed that transportation is not the right way to highlight a real problem.

“You shouldn’t burden people and treat them like political props — it’s dehumanizing,” Manning said.

He said, however, that immigration is a tricky subject. Places that have come out in favor of migrants and asylum seekers may not “see the difficulties of all that is associated with this”, he said.

In the predominantly Latino neighborhood of Corona in New York’s Queens borough, the large congregation of Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic Church held a special service on Wednesday to pray for immigrants. In an interview, their pastor, the Reverend Manuel Rodriguez, called the transports a “horrendous crime”.

“We are all horrified by the consistent violation of human rights by Governor DeSantis and other governors who are so inhumane and unethical to continue to send human beings to places where they don’t even have not been informed that they would be sent,” Rodriguez said. .

“You don’t use human beings who flee their homeland in fear, because of violence, hunger, persecution, because of the threat of rape…as tools, as objects to do make political arguments,” he said.

___

Associated Press religious coverage receives support through the AP’s collaboration with The Conversation US, with funding from Lilly Endowment Inc. The AP is solely responsible for this content.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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Al Henderson’s Memory Links Governor and Widow | News, Sports, Jobs https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/al-hendersons-memory-links-governor-and-widow-news-sports-jobs/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 05:14:14 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/al-hendersons-memory-links-governor-and-widow-news-sports-jobs/ – Photo Messenger by Bill Shea Gov. Kim Reynolds, left, hugs Christine Henderson, of Fort Dodge, after Henderson introduced her at a Tuesday night fundraiser for State Sen. Tim Kraayenbrink, R-Fort Dodge. In her introduction, Henderson recalled how Reynolds called her to console her after the murder of her husband, Reverend Al Henderson. The event […]]]>

– Photo Messenger by Bill Shea

Gov. Kim Reynolds, left, hugs Christine Henderson, of Fort Dodge, after Henderson introduced her at a Tuesday night fundraiser for State Sen. Tim Kraayenbrink, R-Fort Dodge. In her introduction, Henderson recalled how Reynolds called her to console her after the murder of her husband, Reverend Al Henderson.

The event for state senator Tim Kraayenbrink on Tuesday night had all the trappings of a political rally — candidates visiting crowds, food and live musicians.

Then came the unexpected dose of raw emotion.

Kraayenbrink, R-Fort Dodge, had asked Christine Henderson of Fort Dodge to introduce Governor Kim Reynolds. Kraayenbrink and Henderson attend the same church, St. Paul’s Lutheran Church.

Henderson’s husband, Reverend Al Henderson, was the senior pastor there until he was murdered on church grounds on October 2, 2019.

Christine Henderson recalled how after her husband’s death, Kraayenbrink came to her house and placed her phone on a stool in the living room so Reynolds could talk to her and her family.

– Photo Messenger by Bill Shea
State Sen. Tim Kraayenbrink, R-Fort Dodge, speaks to about 200 people Tuesday night at a fundraiser at his home. Kraayenbrink is unopposed for re-election this year, but due to legislative redistricting following the 2020 census, he will have to run again in 2024.

She also recalled how Reynolds signed a proclamation declaring a Pay It Forward day in memory of Al Henderson.

After the introduction, Reynolds and Christine Henderson kissed. When Reynolds next took the microphone, her eyes were red and she spoke hesitantly at first. She has pledged to sign a Pay It Forward proclamation each year she is governor.

Reynolds then praised Kraayenbrink, telling the senator “we love you to pieces,” and soon turned to promoting Republican principles.

“We’re showing the country and Iowa what conservative leadership is all about and getting things done,” she says.

“In Iowa, America Still Works” she added.

– Photo Messenger by Bill Shea

A man gazes at a work of art by Mary Muller at the Blanden Memorial Art Museum. — Messenger photo by Bill Shea Guthrie Guthrie County Attorney Brenna Bird, Republican nominee for state attorney general, speaks Tuesday night at a fundraiser for state senator Tim Kraayenbrink , R-Fort Dodge.

She reminded the audience of some 200 people on the lawn of the National Avenue house in Kraayenbrink that she had signed a tax cut bill that will lower the rate of personal income tax at 3.9% and will eliminate any tax on retirement income.

She added that under Republican leadership, Iowa has reduced the time people can collect unemployment.

Reynolds also said the state “protecting girls from sport for girls” with a law that bans transgender athletes.

She said her main goal for 2023 is to implement school choice.

“It is essential, essential, that we have a strong and solid public school system,” she said. “But it is also important that we give parents choice in their child’s education.

The governor was not the only Republican official present.

Secretary of State Paul Pate said voter turnout and election integrity are not mutually exclusive.

“We have it here”, he said.

State Sen. Roby Smith, R-Davenport, the party’s nominee for state treasurer, touted his 12 years in the Senate and his work for the US Bank as his qualifications.

Guthrie County Attorney Brenna Bird said if elected state attorney general, she would support law enforcement and sue President Joe Biden’s administration when she believes she exceeds his authority. She described the Biden administration as “Targeting a rich environment for prosecutions.”

Kraayenbrink is unopposed for re-election this year. Following the legislative division, he will have to run again in 2024.


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2023: Peter Obi inflates Igbo’s political relevance but… https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/2023-peter-obi-inflates-igbos-political-relevance-but/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 02:00:09 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/2023-peter-obi-inflates-igbos-political-relevance-but/ Ebonyi State Governor Dave Umahi has predicted victory for the ruling All Progressives Congress (APC) in next year’s election, picking Labor Party candidate Peter Obi as his second favorite. Umahi disclosed this to State House correspondents on Friday after meeting with President Muhammadu Buhari at the presidential villa in Abuja. According to him, he met […]]]>

Ebonyi State Governor Dave Umahi has predicted victory for the ruling All Progressives Congress (APC) in next year’s election, picking Labor Party candidate Peter Obi as his second favorite.

Umahi disclosed this to State House correspondents on Friday after meeting with President Muhammadu Buhari at the presidential villa in Abuja.

According to him, he met with the President to invite him to commission the new lodge of the Governor of Ebonyi State, the construction of which has just been completed by his administration.

He also said that the current political movement of Peter Obi would go a long way in preparing the environment that will make possible an Igbo presidency in the future.

The Governor, who always maintained that the 2023 presidential race should be an all-Southern affair, said he was fascinated by the momentum created by the Peter Obi movement as it raised awareness about the peoples of the South East and their political relevance.

“What happened during the PDP and APC primaries was kind of a miscalculation on the part of our people, but to say whether they are ready for the presidency of the country at any time, I think Peter Obi’s move is a revelation and that’s why I said I like what he’s doing I’m encouraged by what he’s doing because if he’s not doing what he’s doing fact, this means that the Southeast would have been forgotten.

“So as my party wins, it would have prepared a very good ground for the South East Presidency, so no one is going to write us off and you can see the level of its acceptability, which doesn’t translate by a victory over the APC, I’m sure. But it’s a good move and it reassures the people of the Southeast and the whole country that we are accepted and that we will become one president of this country. ‘is very important.

“Peter Obi’s movement, and all movements, are rooted in the will of God, only God knows who will win, but there has to be a wish. As a party man i wish our party would win and if god says no the next person i wish who should win is peter obi because i strongly believe and i will say it anywhere in this presidency North South.

“After the North took eight years, there is no moral justification for seeking to take another eight years, it should go to the South. So I don’t want Peter Obi to go away. God has the final say and He has the power and gives to whomever He wants,” he said.

Umahi also tried to correct a narrative in the audience that the bloody violence, which was, until recently, prevalent in the South East was simmering due to the prospect of a Peter Obi winning the election in 2023, saying that security was returning to the region because of nationwide successes.

“You cannot technically attribute the killings to the Igbo presidency. You can see that security is generally improving in the country and that has nothing to do with Peter Obi’s move. The Peter Obi movement is a movement rooted in fairness, justice and fairness.

“It may not result in an outright victory, because I have to defend my party, I have to wish my party good luck and I have my party’s ticket. But if what he does has a sense, not just in the Southeast, it makes sense. So the killings in the Southeast should never be attributed to this kind of movement,” he said.

Asked about the chances of his party, the APC, in the Southeast in the upcoming election, the Governor noted that the game would change as different dynamics would be set in place to determine people’s interests and predict that Obi would get a vote. substantial number of votes. of the region.

“It’s going to be a completely different ball game because when the campaigns start, our people’s interest in terms of the presidency is there, you can’t wish for it, but everybody in the South East, holding the ticket to his party is going to have a hard time and he is going to fight.

“You won’t tell the guy with the House of Assembly ticket to look at the big picture of the Igbo presidency. He may not see it. But that’s not to say Peter Obi won’t get substantial votes in the South East, it’s there.

Asked about the crises within the ruling APC and the likely impacts of the crises on the party’s chances at the polls next year, he said: ‘I think we don’t have any problems in the APC like the kind of problems that arise in other parties. In a big house, there are vases of honor, another vase of dishonor. This literally means there must be problems in a big house like APC, but APC’s structure and spread is such that victory is assured.

“I can assure you that some of the disagreements in some states are going to be resolved. A mechanism has been put in place by Mr. President, the Party Candidate, his Vice President and the National President and Party Leadership, to resolve these disputes and I believe we are well prepared for victory in 2023” , did he declare. .

“Talking about the relevance of the new Governors Lodge he has just built, he said that I am building stunning projects to let our brothers and sisters in the South East know first and foremost that Ebonyi State had reached maturity. So if I didn’t get anything, it’s to restore the confidence of our people because even when we talk about the marginalization of the South East, you come from the South East, we talk about the marginalization of the Ebonyi people.

“So I built this project for people like you, to make sure that we went to the same school, that we had the same brains and that we came of age and that no one should neglect the state anymore of Ebonyi. And for some people we use it to punish them, those who neglect us are punished by this gigantic project and my projects are projects that you will not find anywhere in the Southeast. You can cross-reference this. So it’s for punishment.

“The benefit is to instill confidence in our employees, to make our employees number one in everything we do. OK? That’s why when you’re going to get married, you don’t wear a ragged dress and wonder what is the economic benefit of the beautiful dress you wear? It’s to build trust and acceptance in your bride,” he said.

]]> Portfolio ‘wake-up’ hinges on state of public pensions https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/portfolio-wake-up-hinges-on-state-of-public-pensions/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 04:25:07 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/portfolio-wake-up-hinges-on-state-of-public-pensions/ In Florida, Governor Ron DeSantis launched an outright attack on ESG in an Aug. 23 press release that accompanied the action by the administrators of the Florida State Board of Trustees. “Corporate power has increasingly been used to impose an ideological agenda on the American people through the perversion of financial investment priorities under the […]]]>

In Florida, Governor Ron DeSantis launched an outright attack on ESG in an Aug. 23 press release that accompanied the action by the administrators of the Florida State Board of Trustees. “Corporate power has increasingly been used to impose an ideological agenda on the American people through the perversion of financial investment priorities under the euphemistic banners of environmental, social and corporate governance and diversity, inclusion and equity,” he said.

In July, the Governor announced proposals for the 2023 legislative session that would prohibit the state Board of Directors from considering ESG factors in investments and require SBA fund managers “to only consider maximizing return on investment only on behalf of Florida retirees,” the governor said. says the press release.

Other states have taken different steps to warn public pension plan managers and other state officials.

Last month, Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar identified BlackRock Inc. as one of 10 financial firms he says are boycotting energy companies.

Mr. Hegar is implementing a 2021 state law that prevents state agencies and public pension funds from investing in such companies.

“The environmental, social and corporate governance movement has produced an opaque and perverse system in which some financial companies no longer make decisions in the best interests of their shareholders or customers, but instead use their financial clout to advance a social and political agenda shrouded in secrecy,” Mr. Hegar said in an Aug. 24 press release.

The law covers the $199.9 billion Texas Teachers’ Retirement System; $44 billion Texas County and District Retirement System; Texas Permanent Schools Fund of $40 billion; $37 billion Texas Municipal Retirement System; $39.6 billion Texas Employee Retirement System; and the $116 million Texas Emergency Services Retirement System, all based in Austin.

The law also contains a caveat: a state government entity is not affected if it “determines that the requirement would be inconsistent with its fiduciary responsibility with respect to the investment of the entity’s assets or other obligations imposed by law regarding the investment of the entity’s assets.”

In Kentucky, Attorney General Daniel Cameron issued an opinion in May that while “asset owners may pursue a social purpose” to achieve an ESG objective, “investment managers tasked with making investments funds for Kentucky’s public retirement systems must be resolute in their motivation and action.”

Stating that “politics has no place in Kentucky’s public pensions”, Mr. Cameron said that “stakeholder capitalism” and “environmental, social and governance” investment practices that introduce incentives joint ventures in investment decisions are inconsistent with Kentucky trust law. fees owed by investment management companies to Kentucky public pension plans. »

In March, Idaho Governor Brad Little signed the Disfavored State Investments Act, which stated that no public entity engaged in investment activities should consider ESG factors “in a way that could override prudent investor rule. The law, which took effect on July 1, defines a disadvantaged investment as an investment “contrary to public order” of the state “by law, concurrent resolution or decree.”

The law also states that a public entity “serving as a fiduciary to select investment options for investors may offer preferred environmental, social and governance investment alternatives, but such investments will not be necessary and sufficient alternatives must be offered”.

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Biden administration allocates $1 billion for economic projects – NBC10 Philadelphia https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/biden-administration-allocates-1-billion-for-economic-projects-nbc10-philadelphia/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 12:33:11 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/biden-administration-allocates-1-billion-for-economic-projects-nbc10-philadelphia/ President Joe Biden and Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo announce Friday $1 billion in federal grants for manufacturing, clean energy, agriculture, biotechnology and other sectors that will go to 21 regional partnerships. The winners were chosen from 529 initial applicants vying for grants as part of last year’s $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package. The Biden […]]]>

President Joe Biden and Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo announce Friday $1 billion in federal grants for manufacturing, clean energy, agriculture, biotechnology and other sectors that will go to 21 regional partnerships.

The winners were chosen from 529 initial applicants vying for grants as part of last year’s $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package. The Biden administration has repeatedly presented a vision of a more self-sufficient economy driven by high-tech manufacturing and the development of renewable energy.

“The beauty of all of this is that we’re not going to let you get left behind as we move to a more digital economy, to a more technical economy, to a green economy,” Raimondo told The Associated Press. “People want to work where they live. People want to know there is a place for them in a changing economy.”

Unlike much of the pandemic aid that was intended to meet immediate needs, the $1 billion in grants is part of a longer-term effort to revitalize parts of the country that have needed an economic jolt. for existing industries and capital for new ventures. The mission is personal for Raimondo, whose father lost his job at a watch factory in Rhode Island. She said the grants are the largest ever given to local economic development by the Department of Commerce.

The grants include $65.1 million in California to improve agricultural production and $25 million for a robotics cluster in Nebraska. Georgia gets $65 million for artificial intelligence. There is $63.7 million for lithium battery development in New York. West Virginia coal counties would receive $62.8 million to help transition to solar power and find new uses for abandoned mines.

Raimondo said the winners were chosen based on merit rather than politics. She estimated that the investments, which will be provided over five years in the form of repayments, will result in at least 100,000 jobs.

Strongly Republican states such as Oklahoma and South Dakota have received funding, and money is also funneling ahead of November’s midterm elections to political battlegrounds that could decide congressional control. There’s $44 million for regenerative medicine in New Hampshire, where Democrat Maggie Hassan is defending her US Senate seat. Pennsylvania, which has an open Senate seat, is set to receive $62.7 million for robotics and artificial intelligence.

The massive amount of coronavirus aid early in President Joe Biden’s term helped accelerate job growth as the United States recovered from the pandemic. But the hiring has been accompanied by a surge in inflation that hit a 40-year high this summer, crushing consumer confidence and putting the administration on the defensive over how its policies are helping the economy.

Even though much of the coronavirus money has been disbursed, the administration has said it still needs more money to contain the disease and its variations. Biden unsuccessfully sought $22.5 billion from Congress to deal with and prevent outbreaks, a figure that lawmakers reduced to $10 billion during negotiations. But additional funding was never passed by Congress despite confirmed cases now averaging about 90,000 a day.

White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre tried to play down the funding shortfall after the Food and Drug Administration approved modified vaccine booster shots on Wednesday. Jean-Pierre said booster shots would be available after the Labor Day holiday as the administration worked with local partners.

Still, the economic development grants indicate the relief program could have a multi-decade impact that goes beyond the COVID-19 pandemic. The New Orleans area will receive $50 million to use hydrogen produced by wind power that does not cause carbon emissions, a significant change in Louisiana, a state that has long relied on fossil fuels.

“With clean hydrogen, we can remain an energy state – but become an energy state of the future that has less impact on the environment,” said Michael Hecht, president and CEO of Greater New Orleans Inc. , a non-profit economic development organization. “When money and morality come together, you get things done.”

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Biden’s Expensive, Bloated Government Is Corroding Our Economic Freedom https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/bidens-expensive-bloated-government-is-corroding-our-economic-freedom/ Tue, 30 Aug 2022 21:16:03 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/bidens-expensive-bloated-government-is-corroding-our-economic-freedom/ America’s economic freedom is in increasing jeopardy. That was one of the key findings of the Heritage Foundation’s 2022 Index of Economic Freedom, released in February. The annual global benchmark report, which compares economic governance and the competitiveness of countries, underscored the urgent need for America to change its political course. The latest index reported […]]]>

America’s economic freedom is in increasing jeopardy.

That was one of the key findings of the Heritage Foundation’s 2022 Index of Economic Freedom, released in February. The annual global benchmark report, which compares economic governance and the competitiveness of countries, underscored the urgent need for America to change its political course.

The latest index reported that the United States fell from 20th to 25th place in the global economic freedom rankings – its lowest result since the first index was published in 1995.

Since the release of the index 2022 Six months ago, deplorably, America’s economic freedom was further undermined by the big government campaign engineered by the Biden administration and its far-left allies.

The erosion of economic freedom is felt by many Americans. Inflation hit a 40-year high of 9.1% in June, and the economy contracted in the first and second quarters of the year.

Despite America’s already weakened fiscal health, the Biden administration has raced to implement a socialist political agenda that has added trillions to the national debt, raised taxes through higher inflation, increased the regulatory burden and centralized more federal power over the economy.

Take the latest example: the cancellation by President Joe Biden of certain student loan debt. Noting that this decision would cost half a trillion dollars, the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget underline that the federal government’s actions on student loans since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic have cost an estimated $800 billion. Of that, about $750 billion is directly due to executive action and regulatory changes by the Biden administration.

Already saddled with a national debt of more than $30 trillion, America can’t afford offer hundreds of billions more to wealthy people. It would only add to inflation.

As a recent Wall Street Journal editorial to sum upBiden’s politically motivated decision to write off half a trillion dollars in student loan debt “is by far the worst national decision of Biden’s presidency and fools Congress and all Americans who have repaid loans or didn’t go to college.

Indeed, America’s economic freedom is under attack by massive government spending that drives the country and its citizens into debt, and the taxes that must ultimately pay for the government’s spending spree transfer freedom of choice from the individual in government.

From a broader perspective, the cost, size, and intrusion of government is a central issue of economic freedom.

Widening deficits and growing debt burdens, both of which are direct consequences of government fiscal mismanagement, have led to the erosion of the overall fiscal health of the United States, whether the spending spree in course has exacerbated. Deviations from sound fiscal positions often disrupt macroeconomic stability, induce economic uncertainty, and thereby undermine U.S. economic freedom and resilience.

The country’s competitive position is not threatened because the federal government is not spending enough. The problem is that government has become too big in terms of scale, scope and power over our daily lives.

As the Index of Economic Freedom and numerous other studies have pointed out, a nation’s level of economic freedom goes hand in hand with its competitiveness and the general standard of living of its citizens.

More than ever, economic freedom – which is guaranteed by respecting the principles of the rule of law, limited government, regulatory efficiency and open markets – is essential to creating opportunities for people to work. , produce, save and prosper while improving the situation of the nation. global capacity for better health, a cleaner environment and national security.

To that end, Americans should understand that economic freedom is much more than a business environment in which entrepreneurship and prosperity can flourish.

With its far-reaching effects on various aspects of human development, economic freedom empowers ordinary people, unleashes powerful forces of choice and opportunity, nurtures other freedoms, and improves the overall quality of life.

Making a strong case for why America needs policies that promote prosperity, Heritage Foundation President Kevin Roberts and Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, wrote a common forum earlier this year in which they wrote:

The political current always runs towards statism. But as GK Chesterton said, “a dead thing can go with the stream, but only a living thing can go against it.” Since the founding of America – on the principles of market capitalism that the elites hated then as now – we have been the living thing in the global economy. For two centuries, we have defied the cronyism and timidity of insiders in business and politics and entrusted our economy to our people – and it has made all the difference.

As Robert and Lee emphasized in this commentary, “economic freedom is not something Americans should apologize for, but exploit, stimulate, and give free rein to—for our own good, and that of everyone else as well.”

This is the year to act on that reminder to restore America’s economic freedom.

This piece originally appeared in The daily signal

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Republicans seize affidavit accusing DOJ of midterm political stunt against Trump https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/republicans-seize-affidavit-accusing-doj-of-midterm-political-stunt-against-trump/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 04:01:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/republicans-seize-affidavit-accusing-doj-of-midterm-political-stunt-against-trump/ Outcry over the search three weeks ago pushed Trump, who teased a 2024 campaign, back to the center of a midterm election cycle already rocked by the Supreme Court’s overturning of abortion rights — a factor that gave Democrats new hope of avoiding a Republican red wave in November. While President Joe Biden has avoided […]]]>
Outcry over the search three weeks ago pushed Trump, who teased a 2024 campaign, back to the center of a midterm election cycle already rocked by the Supreme Court’s overturning of abortion rights — a factor that gave Democrats new hope of avoiding a Republican red wave in November.
While President Joe Biden has avoided commenting at length on his predecessor’s legal status or the investigation, he is now trying to make midterms a choice between him and Trumpism, instead of a referendum on his own performance. The president last week called the ex-president’s “Make America Great Again” philosophy “semi-facism” in comments that raised political pressure before a massive downfall.
The redacted affidavit showed that 184 documents bearing classification marks were recovered from Trump’s Florida resort at Mar-a-Lago in January. This is in addition to 11 sets of documents, some bearing the designation “top secret/SCI” – one of the highest classification levels – taken by the FBI after the property was raided earlier this month. The affidavit, which was used to convince a probable cause judge that a crime had been committed, also showed that the bureau expected to find evidence of obstruction. Large sections of the document have been blacked out to protect FBI agents, witnesses and future prospects of the investigation.

The affidavit and other legal documents show evidence of a long-term effort, long before the August 8 FBI raid, by the Justice Department to recover documents that Trump had taken from the White House and which should have been in the National Archives.

But Republicans capitalized on multiple redactions that obscured all the reasons for the warrant and subsequent FBI raid, to stoke feelings of uncertainty and accuse the bureau and Attorney General Merrick Garland of overstepping the bounds. terminals.

New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu told CNN’s Dana Bash on ‘State of the Union’ on Sunday that the DOJ should give Americans more information about the type of secret documents that were at the residence. of Trump and why they felt compelled to take the politically explosive step of mounting a search.

“My biggest criticism, and I think the concern of most of the country, is, where’s the transparency, right?” said the GOP governor. “If you’re going to take unprecedented action and raid a former president’s house, well, you better have an unprecedented transparency strategy,” added Sununu, who is running for re-election this week. fall.

“You need to be able to show your cards when you take actions like this.”

Sununu’s criticism of the department was significant and may reflect broader Republican opinion, as he has not shied away from criticizing Trump in the past. He is insulated to some degree from the ex-president’s thirst for revenge thanks to his popularity in Granite State, where he pushed back against national GOP pleas to run for the Senate. But Sununu nevertheless hinted that election season politics could have been behind the DOJ’s decision to go ahead with a search.

“We think it’s a coincidence, happening just a few months before the midterm elections…and all that kind of stuff?” Sununu asked. He also called on Biden to apologize for his “semi-facist” comment.

A high-ranking Republican senator, Roy Blunt of Missouri, said Trump should have turned over documents that should have legally been transferred to the National Archives when he left office. And he said officials should be especially careful in handling classified documents. But in his Sunday comments, Blunt also betrayed the political pressure Republicans feel to stand by their party’s dominant figure, Trump, even if the Missouri senator retires at the end of this year.

“What I wonder is why it could be almost two years and less than 100 days before the election, suddenly we are talking about this rather than the economy or inflation or even the program student loans,” Blunt said on ABC. News “This week”.

In addition to suggesting nefarious activity by the Biden administration, Blunt’s comment alluded to GOP frustration that their attacks on Biden were somewhat overtaken by Trump’s return to the spotlight. But the idea that the research was simply concocted to distract from the president’s low approval rating is belied by evidence from court documents and other documents on the case, suggesting months of efforts to retrieve classified documents from Trump amid his delays and refusal to hand him over. The White House said Biden was not given advance notice of the search, underscoring the priority he placed on the independence of the Justice Department.

Yet it remains difficult for outsiders to make a full assessment of whether the DOJ went too far or correctly considered the enormous implications of raiding the home of a former president and potential future presidential candidate. the White House – given the high level of secrecy that surrounds the case due to the classified material involved. The relative lack of information has created a void that Trump and his cronies have filled with misinformation and conspiracy theories, which are now being used by more mainstream Republicans to cast doubt on the conduct of the DOJ.

Hearing date set for Thursday

The next courtroom drama over the search will take place Thursday in a hearing called by a federal judge to hear Trump’s request for an independent “special master” to screen material taken by the FBI to see s it contains legally privileged material.
U.S. District Judge Aileen Cannon asked the Justice Department to file a public response by Tuesday and also to file sealed filings giving more details about what was taken in the search. She said Saturday that she had a “preliminary intent” to grant Trump’s request, but added at the end of the order that it should not be construed as his final decision on the matter.
Trump renews his demand for

The fact that Cannon, a Trump candidate, gave an indication that she might grant his request was greeted by some of the ex-president’s allies on social media as a victory. But such a decision is not considered unreasonable by legal experts in a case like this. The curiosity here is that Trump didn’t make his claim until the government was in possession of the documents the FBI took from Mar-a-Lago for two weeks – a factor that has raised questions about the chaos within his camp, his strategy and the quality of his legal representation, which had been ordered to file a new case after the judge had noted several shortcomings in the initial request.

The furor over the documents comes as Trump’s exposure to various probes appears to be increasing. His inner circle has been drawn into a criminal investigation in Georgia centered on his alleged attempts to undo Biden’s victory in the crucial 2020 swing state. painted a damning picture of the ex-president’s conduct during one of the darkest days in modern US history and is expected to ramp up its hearings soon. And there are several civil and criminal investigations into Trump’s business empire.

It all comes with the former president looking to elevate midterm candidates who buy into his lies about a stolen 2020 election — a generally successful run that may have plagued the GOP with problematic candidates who could give Democrats a chance. chance to hang on to their majority in the Senate. This trend, along with some recent victories by congressional Democrats — including the passage of Biden’s major health care and climate bill — and the Supreme Court’s ruling on abortion, have given hope to Democrats as November approaches.

Yet the parties of first-term presidents typically do poorly in midterm elections, especially with approval ratings around 40%, like Biden’s. So while the 2022 election may be more competitive than expected, history suggests it will threaten the Democrats’ monopoly on political power in Washington.

Intelligence agencies assess the damage

The political and legal shockwaves surrounding the Mar-a-Lago search will unfold this week as a closed-door investigation into potential national security issues raised by Trump’s seemingly cavalier handling of classified documents gathers pace. Director of National Intelligence Avril Haines sent a letter to the House Intelligence and House Oversight committee chairs saying the intelligence community was conducting a damage assessment of documents seized from Trump’s home, according to a letter obtained by CNN. Saturday.

The US intelligence chief told Congress she was conducting a damage assessment of documents taken from Mar-a-Lago

The classification review is being conducted by the Justice Department and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, Haines wrote in the letter first reported by Politico. House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff and House Oversight Chairman Carolyn Maloney said in a joint statement that they were ‘pleased’ Haines had initiated the damage assessment of the classified documents found. at Trump’s home in Florida.

The two presidents, who had previously called for the investigation, pushed for the assessment to be done “quickly”.

Given the sensitive nature of the material under discussion, it seems unlikely that the review will contribute much to the public’s understanding of the extraordinary circumstances of a search of the home of a former president.

This means that the political fallout from the operation is unlikely to take a more extreme turn until the midterm elections approach and risk further deepening the nation’s divisions over Trump, whom he manages to expand further even when not in power.

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Has the political environment changed? The mid-term alums of the 2010 and 2018 waves urge caution. https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/has-the-political-environment-changed-the-mid-term-alums-of-the-2010-and-2018-waves-urge-caution/ Sat, 27 Aug 2022 17:31:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/has-the-political-environment-changed-the-mid-term-alums-of-the-2010-and-2018-waves-urge-caution/ Comment this story Comment For Ken Spain, the moment of doubt came just after Labor Day 2010, when a former Democratic House speaker remained politically strong despite a barrage of attack announcements from the GOP. For Meredith Kelly, the moment of fear came in early 2018, just after Republicans passed a massive package of tax […]]]>

Comment

For Ken Spain, the moment of doubt came just after Labor Day 2010, when a former Democratic House speaker remained politically strong despite a barrage of attack announcements from the GOP.

For Meredith Kelly, the moment of fear came in early 2018, just after Republicans passed a massive package of tax cuts.

But none of these fears ended up coming true.

Instead, the two agents, who worked for the party trying to overthrow House control, learned that it is difficult to overturn a political environment ahead of the midterm elections. Recent presidential campaigns have presented big surprises – think of a certain letter from the FBI in late October 2016 or the fall of Wall Street in the fall of 2008 – but midterm campaigns have tended to stay on track. once voters get an overview of the ruling party.

Spain, first communication aid for the National Republican Congressional Committee in 2010, recalled that the veteran Democrat in question had ended up losing part of the 63-seat gain that had propelled the Republicans into the majority, despite his apparent resilience in mid-September.

And in the spring of 2018, GOP campaign committees stopped running ads touting the tax cuts, realizing they were unpopular and Democrats were headed for a gain of more than 40 House seats.

“We knew we had won that argument,” recalled Kelly, the communication master help in 2018 for the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.

Veterans of those 2010 and 2018 midterm elections now find themselves looking back to the 2022 campaign and considering how much things have changed from just a few months ago, when there was consensus bipartisan that the Democrats were going to be wiped out in November.

Instead, mass shootings in New York and Texas made gun violence a major issue for voters, followed by a Supreme Court ruling reversing nearly 50-year-old precedent on the right to abortion, and then a flurry of federal legislation in late summer that energized liberals who previously felt let down by the Democratic legislative majority.

Buyer’s remorse could creep in for the GOP on abortion

All this while gas prices have fallen more than $1 a gallon throughout the summer. And then came Tuesday’s upset victory for Democrat Pat Ryan in a swing congressional district in upstate New York after Republicans had a big early lead.

“The question now is not whether the environment has changed,” Kelly said, “but whether it can stay that way for 70 days, an eternity in politics.”

Not so fast, according to Spain. “The political environment is not turning in circles. It’s like the tide. Ultimately, inflation is likely to remain the defining issue.

He takes a long-term view of the issues and believes that history has shown that the only change that is happening is that the environment keeps deteriorating for the majority.

This is how it has gone in the past four midterm elections, with the Democrats losing twice as big and the Republicans losing twice as big. President’s the party defied history in 1998 and 2002 by winning House seats – the only such results in the last 100 years.

In 1998, the midterm elections had unique moments. President Bill Clinton was hugely popular due to a booming economy, and House Republicans decided to nationalize their campaigns against his sex scandal, a move that backfired politically. In 2002, President George W. Bush remained one of the most popular presidents of all time after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

Biden does not have a booming economy and is not a popular wartime president, which makes some agents think that in the current environment, Ryan’s victory on Tuesday was temporary political sugar.

Kelly’s Republican counterpart in 2018 compared Ryan’s victory in New York to a famous scene from ‘I Love Lucy,’ when the title character tries to eat chocolates on a treadmill but is quickly overwhelmed – it’s easier to win a single race now than to defend dozens in November.

“You can eat one chocolate, but there are six more that come on the treadmill,” NRCC communications director Matt Gorman said in 2018.

Gorman knows the feeling: He felt some relief in June 2017 when Republicans narrowly won a special election outside Atlanta that became the most expensive home race ever, while Democrats were testing their medium-term strategy by targeting former GOP-leaning suburban neighborhoods.

Yes, the race was incredibly close, but his team had won, Gorman said. “We went to war and we won.” Until November.

Jesse Ferguson, who ran the DCCC’s media operation for southern congressional districts in 2010, recalled a similar misleading sense of positivity after Democrats won a special election that spring in western Pennsylvania.

Democrats had spent months trying to find the right message as voters grew angry over high unemployment and disenchantment with the Obama administration’s emphasis on passing the Affordable Care Act. In May 2010, the Democratic candidate focused on accusing Republicans of supporting big business that sent jobs overseas.

But, Ferguson said, this question resonated deeply in western Pennsylvania – an area that had been hit by the decline of the steel industry – but over the next few months it waned and found no resonance in other parts of the country.

“Sometimes special elections are isolated and sometimes they are indicative of future outcomes,” he said.

Ferguson thinks the Supreme Court’s abortion decision is a sea change of the type that hasn’t emerged in other recent midterm elections; as evidence of the decision’s effect on abortion, he points to four special elections in July and August in which Democrats fared significantly better than Biden in those districts in 2020.

Ferguson is quick to note that Democrats still face an uphill battle to retain the U.S. House, given Republicans need a net gain of just five seats and belated legal battles over redistricting erupted in favor of the GOP.

“There’s no more strong wind in our face,” he said of the Democrats’ outlook.

In fiery midterm speech, Biden says GOP has turned to ‘semi-fascism’

A recent public poll shows Republicans no longer hold a clear advantage over Democrats in voter enthusiasm, something the ruling party did not see in 2010 or 2018. Additionally, the generic voting question now has voters essentially tied when asked if they intend to vote for a Democrat or a Republican in the House, according to the RealClearPolitics average.

On the eve of the 2010 midterm elections, Republicans held a lead of more than nine points on this question, while just before the 2018 election, Democrats held a lead of more than seven points.

Spain believes the Democrats are enjoying a brief uptick because disgruntled liberals who were always likely to rally behind their candidates returned home earlier than usual.

“Partisan meltdown usually happens after Labor Day,” a time that offers a “last gasp of hope” to avert political disaster, he said. “It’s accelerated.”

After Labor Day 2010, Spain couldn’t believe House Armed Services Committee Chairman Rep. Ike Skelton (D-Mo.) had withstood weeks of GOP ads and held on to a lead.

Later in September, Skelton fell, as did the position of Democrats everywhere, reassuring Spain that the political direction had not changed. “You started to see the bottom drop,” he said.

Gorman also recalled a brief ray of hope after Labor Day 2018 as border security became more important. Then, in early October, Republicans just couldn’t seal their races.

“It was the opposite,” he said. “Races were happening that we didn’t expect.”

Kelly recalled feeling confident of a big win at the same time, after a publicity crush played out in the races as Democrats had expected. Now, she said, Democrats need to learn from this summer and go all out on how a Republican majority would mean less abortion access and more gun freedom in schools.

Voters need to know, she said, that “their freedoms will be further threatened.”

Spain argues that even a neutral environment will lead to a GOP majority in the House — and that the Senate can remain in Democrat hands — but he’s also a reminder of how things continued to turn their way in 2010.

The day before the midterms, NRCC staff members gathered in his office to make their predictions. Most thought they would win around 40-50 seats.

They unrolled Spain’s piece of paper to see it was predicting a 61 siege again, prompting laughter at its bold call. He admitted it was weird and threw the paper away. He only had two seats.

“I would like to keep this paper,” Spain said.

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