Local Government – Milwaukee County First http://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/ Wed, 11 May 2022 01:05:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-7-1.png Local Government – Milwaukee County First http://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/ 32 32 Officials from 37 counties call for veto of collective bargaining bill – The Fort Morgan Times https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/officials-from-37-counties-call-for-veto-of-collective-bargaining-bill-the-fort-morgan-times/ Wed, 11 May 2022 01:05:45 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/officials-from-37-counties-call-for-veto-of-collective-bargaining-bill-the-fort-morgan-times/ Elected officials from 37 counties signed a letter calling on Gov. Jared Polis to veto Senate Bill 22-230, a bill they say serves the public expansion of unions at the expense of service delivery. county services. More than 250 elected officials — largely commissioners — signed the letter of opposition to the bill drafted by […]]]>

Elected officials from 37 counties signed a letter calling on Gov. Jared Polis to veto Senate Bill 22-230, a bill they say serves the public expansion of unions at the expense of service delivery. county services.

More than 250 elected officials — largely commissioners — signed the letter of opposition to the bill drafted by Senate Speaker Stephen Fenberg, D-Boulder, Senate Majority Leader Dominick Moreno, D-Commerce City and the majority leader in the House. Daneya Esgar, D-Pueblo.

“Despite countless attempts and pleas with the drafters of the bill for the opportunity to discuss the bill and communicate about the potential impacts of mandatory collective bargaining and, more importantly, what it would mean for our constituents, we have been ignored,” the letter from Colorado Counties Incorporated begins.

The bill was backed along a 20-15 party line, voted last week at third reading in the Colorado Senate, with Republicans opposed. If enacted in the final days of the legislative session, the legislation would allow nearly 40,000 public employees to unionize and have the potential to bargain collectively.

In addition to county commissioners, in many counties the elected assessor, clerk and recorder, coroner, surveyor, treasurer and sheriff signed the letter requesting a veto of the legislation before it arrives at the governor’s office.

“Governor. Polis, all local government associations, from cities to districts, oppose this bill, along with the undersigned county elected officials,” reads the ICC letter. “It does not purport to resolve In fact, it creates huge problems for counties who will have no choice but to cut services and jobs to pay for the cost of mandatory collective bargaining.

The letter complains that the editors invited cities and higher education “to the table, successfully convincing the editors to exclude their organizations from the bill.”

Exemption for cities and higher education was allowed, the letter theorizes, because of the “huge” expense that would be imposed on them, “just like counties.” According to the bill, the argument that works in higher education is that the unfunded costs of collective bargaining would require the costs to be passed on to students.

“Despite our efforts and the efforts of our organization to secure a seat at the table, a bill was introduced in the Senate [not the House] with only two weeks until the legislative session,” reads the letter to Polis and members of the Colorado General Assembly. “All but one of our Democratic senators, 20 of 21, have signed on as co-sponsors.”

While the bill’s budget impact could be quite small for the state — it’s expected to cost $419,716 in the first fiscal year and rise to $592,079 in the second year — Republican Party Chairman Kristi Burton Brown, projects a much bigger impact than the budget note. in the bill indicates. She predicts it would cost the 61 included counties a combined $400 million.

Logan County Commissioner Byron Pelton is planning a price tag of at least $400,000 to set up the framework for collective bargaining in his county. The three commissioners and three other elected government officials from Logan County signed the letter, and the three commissioners from neighboring Morgan County also signed the letter. Many of the 37 counties all have commissioners signing against the legislation, called by the ICC “the largest unfunded mandate on counties in Colorado state history.”

The bill takes the decision to collectively bargain away from local employees, elected officials and voters, and compels it instead, the county’s elected officials complain.

“At the Senate Committee, just 36 hours after the bill was introduced, the sponsor said it may be ‘the best stakeholder bill,’ although he had no enough conversations with county commissioners via Colorado Counties Incorporated,” the CCI letter read.

The few Democratic counties that support the legislation have never widely endorsed collective bargaining in their own counties, even though they have such authority, the letter points out.

“This represents a massive usurpation of local authority and local control by the government closest to the people: the counties,” the letter continued. “It’s a testament to a poor legislative process – a massive unfunded term at the end of the legislative session.”

The letter ends by asking for a veto on the measure.

In an earlier Fort Morgan Times article related to the bill, Morgan County Commissioner Jon Becker said, “The Legislature decided to listen to a particular interest in relation to every voter in Colorado.” And Burton Brown has hinted that Democrats are serving union bosses at the expense of the will of the state, accusing them of “attempting[ing] to buy their tickets. Voters should be angry at this cruel betrayal.

She points to a 2021 Colorado Sun report that the AFL-CIO would withhold campaign donations from Democrats until the end of the legislative session and may withhold donations entirely until they are treated as genuine partners.

A Fort Morgan Times review of Fenberg’s latest and greatest 2020 top contributors report found two contributors listed: $1,000 from Colorado WINS (Workers for Innovative New Solutions) and $1,000 from SEIU Local 105. Moreno’s list endorsement organizations ahead of its final Senate race included back-to-back endorsements by the AFL-CIO, Colorado WINS, SEIU Local 105, and Pipefitters Local 208. Major contributor reports have yet to be filed for 2022 , but Burton argues that many Democratic campaigns are similarly funded.

“This bill defies the will of local voters and takes away the ability of county commissioners to do the job our residents elected us to do,” said Weld County Commissioner Scott James. “The double burden of cutting county services while increasing county budgets is a ‘no-win’ scenario for residents under normal circumstances – but it’s an even crueler irony that this bill is being considered in these times of rising inflation and global uncertainty.”

Counties with elected officials signing to oppose the legislation include Alamosa, Arapahoe, Baca, Bent, Cheyenne, Conejos, Crowley, Delta, Dolores, Douglas, Elbert, El Paso, Fremont, Garfield, Grand, Huerfano, Jackson, Kit Carson, Kiowa, Lincoln, Logan, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Morgan, Otero, Park, Phillips, Pueblo, Teller, Prowers, Rio Grande, Washington, Weld and Yuma.

]]>
Summary of weekly meetings – La Presse https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/summary-of-weekly-meetings-la-presse/ Sun, 08 May 2022 23:00:44 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/summary-of-weekly-meetings-la-presse/ TOWN HALL OF FATHERCouncil approves rezoning of parcel on Scheuring Road Council unanimously approved a rezoning application for a parcel at 1360 Scheuring Road, just northeast of the intersection with American Boulevard, to allow for a drive-thru/fast-food restaurant project. The project is surrounded by multi-family zoning to the north, a business park to the south, […]]]>

TOWN HALL OF FATHER
Council approves rezoning of parcel on Scheuring Road

Council unanimously approved a rezoning application for a parcel at 1360 Scheuring Road, just northeast of the intersection with American Boulevard, to allow for a drive-thru/fast-food restaurant project.

The project is surrounded by multi-family zoning to the north, a business park to the south, the city water reservoir and multi-family zoning to the east and businesses to the west.

In 2002, a Walmart/Menards Planned Development District (PDD) was established, on the northern two-thirds of the plot, and permitted fast-food or convenience businesses on the northern two-thirds of the site.

The proposed plan includes a 2,460 square foot Starbucks with a two-way drive-thru window.

Council also gave unanimous consent to a final 104-lot platform and four exit lots from the fifth Waterview Heights addition in the 2400 block of Lost Dauphin Road.

City will pick up tab for balls for adult softball leagues’

Those who play in De Pere’s adult softball leagues will see a little financial relief this summer.

De Pere City Council voted unanimously (Alderman Devin Perock recused himself due to a conflict of interest) on Tuesday May 3 to provide balls to all four adult leagues, saving teams more than $100 in bullet costs.

Parks, Recreation and Forestry Director Marty Kosobucki said it would be an additional expense for the city of about $2,000, which could be paid from team proceeds this year and budgeted for subsequent years.

“The Bellevue league is a 50+ league, teams pay around $500 and balls are included,” said resident Chris Laron, who plays in three other leagues besides De Pere. “At Allouez, it’s about $480, and the balls are included. And in Ashwaubenon, it’s $300 for a team to play and the balls are provided. Here at De Pere it’s around $622, and balls are not included. This adds about $168 in team expenses.

Trespass Ordinance Passed

Prompted mainly by what village administrator Alex Kaker described as a few incidents last summer, the village council unanimously decided to give its law enforcement personnel more flexibility when it’s about trespassers on wagons within the village limits.

State railroad trespassing laws, which passed at the May 2 council meeting, give officers the ability to issue citations instead of taking violators to jail .

The move, Kaker said, gives officers more discretion.

Previously, trespassers caught in railcars were taken to the county jail or given a warning.

Newly passed laws will now give officers the option and ability to issue municipal citations for such violations, putting offenders before Judge Kevin Rathburn, who oversees the Suamico Area Joint Municipal Court, serving communities in the village. of Suamico, Town of Chase, and Town of Little Suamico, instead of the Downtown Circuit Court.

“I think there was activity last summer,” he said. “I wouldn’t say there was a spike (in rail trespassing) but they saw it happening and they (local law enforcement) wanted to make sure they had options.”

From Father

FATHER’S SCHOOL BOARD

Organizational meeting of the board of directors

The De Pere School Board held its organizational meeting on Monday, May 2, inaugurating its three newly elected board members: Adam Clayton, Chad Jeskewitz and Brittony Cartwright.

The Board also appointed officers and selected committee members.

Younquist

Youngquist

David Youngquist was named president for a second term; Doug Seeman was chosen as vice-president; Dan Van Straten was again chosen as Clerk and Jeff Mirkes was chosen as Treasurer.

The finance committee will consist of Mirkes, Jeskewitz and Clayton.

The Curriculum and Instruction Committee will include Van Straten, Cartwright and Youngquist. Van Straten, Jeskewitz and Seeman form the personnel committee.

Board salaries

The board elected to keep board member salaries at their current level, with the board chair receiving $3,600 per year, officers receiving $3,400 per year, and general members receiving $3,200 per year.

BELLEVUE VILLAGE COUNCIL

Parks, Recreation and Forestry Service Annual Report

Director Adam Waszak presented the Department of Parks, Recreation and Forestry’s 2021 annual report to the board at its April 27 meeting.

“Really what we’re doing is improving the quality of life here in Bellevue, and that’s our goal,” Waszak said. “Our parks division hasn’t changed much through 2021. The only thing I would add is you know that 326 acres of park land, we will be adding another 12 acres with the completion of the park complexes. Crystal Cove apartments. He said after a year of decline — 2020, when things were shut down, numbers were limited and facility rentals were low — the Village Parks Department rebounded in 2021.

Parks

“Our lease capacity has hit our five-year threshold, so that’s a five-year average,” Waszak said.

He said looking at the numbers – 75-82% of the time the park shelters and community center are available, they are rented out.

“So there’s this need in the community for these spaces,” Waszak said. “As we look to reinvest in our parks system and grow our parks system, it’s important to remember that these gated facilities are needed here within the community.”

He said rental and uses of sports facilities in the village also rebounded in 2021, after seeing a significant decline in 2020.

Regarding leisure activities run by the village – Waszak said 6,700 different people participated in events and programs in 2021.

“Our larger community events — those attendances kind of went down,” he said. “And the same with our senior programs.”

However, Waszak said those too are starting to rebound and are expected to rise in 2022.

Regarding the forest division, he said the tree canopy in the village is growing in size and quantity every year, and 2021 is no different.

“Our total tree inventory currently of public trees that we are responsible for maintaining is approximately 5,400,” Waszak said. “And it continues to grow. Of the 421 trees planted in 2021, approximately 160 of them were new inventory trees.

Trees

He said that nationally, Bellevue compares well with villages of similar size.

Waszak said each year the National Recreation and Parks Association (NRPA) sets benchmarks to better measure how departments are meeting the needs of its citizens.

“For 2021 the NRPA average was 3,600 residents per playground, here in Bellevue we have 2,000,” he said. “9.9 acres of parkland per 1,000 people, here in Bellevue we’re at 20. The average partner agency has 8.2 full-time employees per 10,000 people, here in Bellevue it’s 2.5. The average agency partner spends $88 per capita and per capita, here in Bellevue it’s $41.

Waszak said those numbers are kind of what you make them.

“Every community is different,” he said. “The only thing I take from this is that our residents have access to the parks. It’s huge. And we do it in a fiscally responsible way, which is also very important.

Citizens Academy

Citizen Academy Diploma

The latest graduates of the Village Citizens Academy were recognized at the board meeting.

The multi-week program is intended to educate participants on the structure and function of local government – ​​each night focusing on an element of local government, including law enforcement, fire protection, public works , budget/finance, community development and parks/recreation services .

“Thank you very much to everyone who is here and has taken the time to come and learn more about the Village of Bellevue,” said Village President Steve Soukup.

Press Times editor Heather Graves, editor Josh Staloch and correspondent Lee Reinsch contributed to these memoirs.

]]>
Does the merger of the three Delhi municipalities really deepen the spirit of decentralization? https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/does-the-merger-of-the-three-delhi-municipalities-really-deepen-the-spirit-of-decentralization/ Sat, 07 May 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/does-the-merger-of-the-three-delhi-municipalities-really-deepen-the-spirit-of-decentralization/ On April 19, the Union government pushed an act through Parliament to merge the three Delhi local governments into a single Delhi municipality. The debate sparked by this decision reminds us that despite the presence of local authorities, the spirit of decentralization is lacking in India. Public debates on the new Municipal Corporation of Delhi […]]]>

On April 19, the Union government pushed an act through Parliament to merge the three Delhi local governments into a single Delhi municipality. The debate sparked by this decision reminds us that despite the presence of local authorities, the spirit of decentralization is lacking in India.

Public debates on the new Municipal Corporation of Delhi controversy have focused on two issues. First, was the merger a good decision? Which arrangement is better to deal with Delhi’s garbage crisis or financial problems: three local governments or one – or for that matter, two or four?

Home Minister Amit Shah justified the merger by saying the single company would operate more efficiently. A serious response must identify the objectives of local governments (a contested issue) and carefully assess the arrangements made in Delhi. But in general, policymakers have not explored what kind of local governance arrangements would suit India’s major cities and metropolitan areas.

Most cities have unique local governments due to historical legacy, not scrutiny. A review of the governance needs of big cities should find a place high on the public agenda, instead of impromptu and one-sided decisions to replace the government architecture.

The second question in public debates is: who has the power to decide on the modalities of local governance? Local government is listed as a state in the Constitution, which means that the state legislature has legislative jurisdiction. However, Delhi is an exception as its state legislature operates with reduced powers, which itself is a matter of controversy.

The Union government argues that it has the power to reconstitute the local governments of Delhi while the state government argues otherwise. Opponents note that the arrangement with three local governments itself came from the Delhi state legislature in 2011, not the national parliament.

The second question raises a deep problem of decentralization, a radical feature of governance that was formally enshrined in the Constitution via an amendment 30 years ago. The question is how the spirit of decentralization affects decisions about local governance arrangements.

Whether the power to create local government rests with the national parliament or the state legislature, both are interested parties since decentralization will subsequently affect their own powers and responsibilities. Indeed, realpolitik suggests that substantial decentralization is unlikely to be voluntary.

For the benefit of the ruling party

In the current controversy, opponents accuse the national government of centralization which benefits the ruling party. Proponents of the move accuse the Delhi state government of resisting the merger of local governments for its own political benefit. Without suggesting a false equivalence, we note that both accusations are probably partly true.

Decentralization suffers when implemented centrally, whether by national or state government. Neither government is particularly concerned about the opinions of local governments and citizens of Delhi. (We disregard politicized support for the merger, as local governments in Delhi are currently owned by the same centralized party that controls the national government.)

This leads us to ask how the spirit of decentralization should shape decisions about local governance arrangements, the subject of our book Govern locally. The constitutional amendments for decentralization make the mind very clear. The 74th Amendment views urban local governments as “vibrant democratic units of self-government” with “such power and authority as is necessary to enable them to carry out the responsibilities assigned to them.”

The letter and the spirit of the Constitution have three implications. First, states should have independent bodies to organize democratic local government elections and share public finances. Such bodies have been established by state legislatures across India as provided by the constitutional amendment. Second, local governments should have the autonomy to organize their own affairs – naturally, within constitutional parameters also applicable to state and national governments.

Third, since local governments would now have governance responsibilities previously assumed by state governments, the latter would have to transfer the corresponding facilities, personnel and tacit knowledge, thereby creating capacity within local governments for the new responsibilities. . In fact, the local governments were not autonomous from the state governments and the corresponding facilities and personnel were not transferred.

Moreover, not even the Union government that introduced the constitutional amendment subsequently possessed it, let alone promoted its intent. It has initiated and funded mega urban development programs (such as the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission and the Smart City Mission) giving direction to state governments to strengthen state agencies (“parastatals”) rather than state governments. local.

Election gains

The recent Delhi controversy mostly ignores the spirit of decentralization. Naturally, the tugs of short-term electoral calculations have shaped the debate over the merger of Delhi’s local governments. But there seems to be little else in the debate, and certainly no attention to the creation of “dynamic democratic units of autonomy”, whether the city has one or three local governments. .

Even in Kerala, despite its reputation for decentralization, state law gives the state government the power to determine how local governments operate. Such top-down control erodes people’s participation in local governance and also erodes decentralized service delivery. While even big cities like Delhi are unable to run their affairs on their own, the problems are far greater in the smaller towns that make up most of the urban spaces. (According to the 2011 census, out of 4,041 urban local governments, only about 1% have more than one million inhabitants.)

Today, when there is a clear hierarchy of importance between levels of government and local government receives the least respect, we end with the encouraging example of Bharat Singh from Kota in Rajasthan. In 2015, he became a panch of the Kundanpur panchayat after serving in the state legislature and cabinet. Bharat Singh said he could do things in the panchayat that he could not do as a minister. This is a call to place greater value on local government.

When we, the citizens ourselves, turn to the power-soaked perspective of national and state governments where local autonomy matters little, then we are not questioning the problematic terms of governance debates. Whether Delhi has one government or three, the arguments of proponents and opponents rest on the tired field of power aggrandizement and nothing else. The spirit of decentralization demands a different set of questions – about capacity and autonomy for self-governance, swa-raj.

Suraj Jacob teaches development and policy at Azim Premji University. Babu Jacob retired as Chief Secretary to the Government of Kerala after a career in public service. Their recent book is titled Governance Locally: Institutions, Policies and Implementation in Indian Cities (Cambridge University Press, 2021).

]]>
Local government authorities lost billions of dollars in revenue https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/local-government-authorities-lost-billions-of-dollars-in-revenue/ Thu, 05 May 2022 05:14:50 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/local-government-authorities-lost-billions-of-dollars-in-revenue/ According to the local government report, officers were supposed to hand over to councils a sum of 5.62 billion/- from the collection, while council employees were supposed to hand over the full amount collected. Instead, the CAG report indicates that collectors and staff remitted to the Council a total of 987.76 million/- and 1.8 billion/- […]]]>

According to the local government report, officers were supposed to hand over to councils a sum of 5.62 billion/- from the collection, while council employees were supposed to hand over the full amount collected.

Instead, the CAG report indicates that collectors and staff remitted to the Council a total of 987.76 million/- and 1.8 billion/- only, thus, 4.64 billion/- and 5.49 billion/- were not remitted respectively, making a total of 10.13 billion collected. but not banked.

Given the procedures involved in collecting the Council’s revenue from its own sources, the CAG reviewed information from the Local Government Revenue Collection System (LGRCIS) and the bank statements of the Council’s revenue accounts kept with NMB Bank Plc, CRDB Bank Plc, NBC and DCB Bank Plc. for the period from July 2019 to June 2021.

The CAG further claims that the embezzlement of collected funds was perpetrated by altering LGRCIS information to conceal the facts and producing fabricated receipts.

“I urge the government to take appropriate steps to ensure that it recovers the amount from the responsible staff and officers,” CAG Charles Kichere said in the report.

However, the CAG discovered that 16 local authorities made adjustments to transactions in the LGRCIS for their own revenues totaling 28.33 billion/-, without following the adjustment procedures provided for.

These adjustments were not approved by the respective accountants and were not the subject of any supporting documents. This anomaly was attributed to weak internal control systems over transaction adjustments in the LGRCIS.

According to Kichere, the unauthorized adjustments could be misappropriated revenue or fraudulent transactions made through own-source revenue. Similarly, reconciliations made through erasing and correcting revenue transactions in the system without the approval of the competent authorities could facilitate the diversion of government revenue.

“I recommend to the responsible authorities to take appropriate action against the officials mentioned in the respective reports who made changes to the system without observing the proper procedures;

In addition, PO-RALG is advised to improve controls over the Local Government Revenue Collection Information System (LGRCIS) used by local government authorities,” Kichere states in the report.

In another separate audit, the CAG reviewed the management of the implementation of agreements with agents (receivers) to collect its revenue from its own sources and identified various weaknesses.

For example, the CAG said they found that despite the contract with M/s Pick Trading Ltd expiring on November 30, 2019, the company continued to receive revenue without a contract for 11 months from December 01, 2019 to October 30, 2020, where a total amount of 496.47 million/- was collected, however, only 900,000/- was remitted to the Council, leaving a sum of 495.57 million/- unremitted.

CAG Kichere recommends that the government take appropriate action against the officer and staff involved in the hijacking.

However, during the audit, 7 local government authorities did not submit payment vouchers to me for 1.37 billion/-, in respect of payments made during the financial years 2018/19 to 2020/21.

Following the non-submission of payment vouchers for verification, the validity of the payments made could not be verified. The CAG warns that this is contrary to Section 15(2) of the Public Audit Act 2008 and Order 8(2)(c) of the Local Government Finance Memorandum 2009.

“I recommend that the PO-RALG Permanent Secretary take appropriate action against local authority staff mentioned in the specific audit reports for failure to present supporting documents for payment,” Kichere stresses.

]]>
Peter Thiel’s New Zealand lodge should be rejected, says council planner https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/peter-thiels-new-zealand-lodge-should-be-rejected-says-council-planner/ Tue, 03 May 2022 13:39:53 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/peter-thiels-new-zealand-lodge-should-be-rejected-says-council-planner/ Peter Thiel has properties around the world, but a proposed luxury lodge in New Zealand may not materialize. Mark Bello | Getty Images The future of Peter Thiel’s luxury lodge on New Zealand’s South Island hangs in the balance after a senior local council planner says the tech billionaire’s development should be rejected on environmental […]]]>

Peter Thiel has properties around the world, but a proposed luxury lodge in New Zealand may not materialize.

Mark Bello | Getty Images

The future of Peter Thiel’s luxury lodge on New Zealand’s South Island hangs in the balance after a senior local council planner says the tech billionaire’s development should be rejected on environmental grounds .

In a 978-page report published on Monday, Sarah Gathercole, senior planner with Queenstown Lakes District Council, recommended that planning permission be refused because the lodge will have “adverse effects” on the quality and character of the landscape.

“These adverse effects cannot be appropriately mitigated,” she said. “Although some positive effects will result from the proposal, I do not consider that it constitutes a (enough) positive effect on the environment to outweigh or fully offset the negative environmental effects.”

Plans for the resort, released by the council last September, show several buildings on the shores of scenic Lake Wanaka. The town of Wanaka is home to just over 10,000 people and is surrounded by sites that were used to film ‘Lord of the Rings’, a film trilogy that Thiel is known to be particularly fond of.

Images of the plans, designed by Tokyo Olympic Stadium architect Kengo Kuma and Associates, show a private residential building built into the hillside as well as a larger luxury pavilion with enough space for 24 people. There is also a separate meditation pod, several water features, and a building at the back of the house.

The so-called owner’s cabin has a spa, pool, theater lounge, office and three bedrooms, while the guest cabin has its own spa and pool, as well as a a library and 10 guest rooms with an uninterrupted view facing north towards the lake. Wanaka and the Southern Alps.

Kengo Kuma and Associates said the goal was to “design organic architecture that blends into the landscape” and respects native nature.

But Gathercole said the proposal is ‘of a scale far beyond what could reasonably be anticipated in the rural area and outstanding natural landscape’.

Three environmental groups opposed the plans while three others called for changes.

Julian Haworth, secretary of the Upper Clutha Environmental Society, which opposed the plans, told CNBC last year that the lodge would be “highly visible” from area trails and Lake Wanaka itself.

“The proposed buildings extend laterally across the landscape for 330 meters and will be highly visible from the Te Araroa track and from Lake Wanaka, two commonly visited public vantage points,” he said. ‘The company has no problem with the applicant building a large but carefully situated residence on the site, but the scale of the proposed development is outrageous.’

A representative for Thiel, who co-founded PayPal and Palantir and supported Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign, did not immediately respond to a CNBC request for comment.

Thiel’s love for New Zealand

Thiel, an early Facebook investor and a friend of Elon Musk, bought the domain in 2015 for $13.5 million through an Auckland-headquartered company called Second Star Limited.

In 2017, it emerged that Thiel had been granted citizenship by the New Zealand government. This provoked a public backlash from local citizens, who accused him of quietly buying citizenship.

Located in relative isolation away from the world’s largest population centers, New Zealand has become a popular destination for wealthy individuals in recent years. Billionaire Google co-founder Larry Page was granted residency early last year.

Home to around 5 million people, the country has become synonymous with “preppers” – those who try to prepare for catastrophic events that could pose a threat to humanity. Today, there is even a dedicated website for people who want to prepare their families for “survival” in New Zealand.

Reports had suggested that Thiel was planning to build some kind of doomsday-proof bunker on his 193-hectare (477-acre) estate in Wanaka, which is currently used as a working farm. Although some of the buildings appear to be built into the side of a hill, it is not clear if any of them are intended to be used as a bunker.

]]>
How Oyo Governor Makinde robs us of local government funds, lied against us – Councilors https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/how-oyo-governor-makinde-robs-us-of-local-government-funds-lied-against-us-councilors/ Sun, 01 May 2022 21:38:23 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/how-oyo-governor-makinde-robs-us-of-local-government-funds-lied-against-us-councilors/ Some aggrieved local lawmakers in Oyo state have accused the state governor, Seyi Makinde, of lying that they received N300,000 as monthly salary when he only paid them N120,000 . Councilors also said they had not received their constituency allowances to support their people locally. SaharaReporters learned that the allegations were made by lawmakers on […]]]>

Some aggrieved local lawmakers in Oyo state have accused the state governor, Seyi Makinde, of lying that they received N300,000 as monthly salary when he only paid them N120,000 .

Councilors also said they had not received their constituency allowances to support their people locally.

SaharaReporters learned that the allegations were made by lawmakers on their WhatsApp group with around 360 members.

A lawmaker representing Ward 9 in the state’s Surulere local government area, who identified himself simply as Omikunle, said the governor refused to pay them their dues and at one point said he there was enough money in the coffers of the local government areas of the state.

He said, “Hon. Kayode, let’s be very honest with ourselves, we don’t know how the governor handles governance affairs in the state, especially at the local government level. Let me tell the truth, I was a smuggler and had clients in every state in the southwestern states.

“If it wasn’t for the federal government closing the borders, I wouldn’t have contested the position of councilor in the state. The money we collected in a whole year since we were elected, I can get it in two trips. I have friends in all legislative branches of local governments in the Southwest. I used to ask about their well being in their respective state and they all blame Seyi Makinde for the way he treats us.

“Why is local government now bad in Oyo State? Our colleagues from other states were telling us that people said Seyi was rich even before he became governor. Some of us have said that the last administration misappropriated money. What money did they embezzle? Did you forget when we were fighting over the ALGON issue, Makinde openly said that outgoing local government executives were after the money in the council.

“He further said that he would not give them any money. I was the local government president’s secretary, and the governor told us at the time that we were going to get rich soon. He said we would be the ones spending the money. That was a year ago and where is the money today? I know of at least four councilors in Osun State. Their salary is N250,000 and after that they receive a monthly advance of N100,000. Oyetola also gave them N250,000 for their people in each ward. He also gave them 170,000 Naira for the celebration of Sallah now.

“Today, a year later, we remain an elected councillor. We bought the form at N350,000 and while that of the House of Assembly was N600,000. Please compare the kind of life we ​​live to that of a state dignitary. All the state councilors were ridiculed.

“We have been lying to our constituents since we came to office. But we’re glad they’re all aware that the governor is not doing well for us. They told us that they are aware that the governor is not doing well for us. They told us that since they had voted for Seyi, they had not seen him…

]]>
Florida Reedy Creek disbandment law won’t go to court, says government lawyer https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/florida-reedy-creek-disbandment-law-wont-go-to-court-says-government-lawyer/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 21:33:12 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/florida-reedy-creek-disbandment-law-wont-go-to-court-says-government-lawyer/ MAITLAND, Florida. – A Maitland lawyer who specializes in local government issues said the law stripping Disney of its special government powers would not hold up in court. Jacob Schumer questions the legality of Senate Bill 4C, which dissolves the Special District of Reedy Creek. Governor Ron DeSantis signed the law last week. [TRENDING: DeSantis […]]]>

MAITLAND, Florida. – A Maitland lawyer who specializes in local government issues said the law stripping Disney of its special government powers would not hold up in court.

Jacob Schumer questions the legality of Senate Bill 4C, which dissolves the Special District of Reedy Creek. Governor Ron DeSantis signed the law last week.

[TRENDING: DeSantis doubles down: Disney, not residents, will pay taxes after Reedy Creek repealed | Florida woman dies; travel insurance would not refund cost of cruise not taken | Become a News 6 Insider (it’s free!)]

A d

Schumer’s insight gained a lot of traction this week after he published an opinion piece in Bloomberg News.

“I don’t see any way the bill that has been signed into law would stand if challenged in court right now,” Schumer said.

Schumer said the legislation that established the special district in 1967 gives Reedy Creek several powers, including higher property taxes.

“They can charge a lot of taxes. They can charge three times more than cities and counties,” Schumer said.

Schumer said that’s a significant power the district uses to issue bonds.

“The amount of taxing power is really critical to the value of the bond,” he said.

Schumer said when the special district was created, the state promised not to alter or restrict Reedy Creek’s right to levy or collect taxes and fees.

A d

“The State of Florida made a contractual promise and the purpose of that promise was to get people to buy these bonds and so the State of Florida is basically saying, ‘Never mind. We know we promised you that, but no more by dissolving Reedy Creek,” Schumer said.

There is still uncertainty as to who would be liable for Reedy Creek’s debts if the special district were dissolved.

DeSantis has said multiple times, including at a Thursday night town hall, that Disney will foot the bill.

“The bonds will be paid by Disney. They will pay taxes, probably more taxes. They will follow the laws that everyone else has to follow,” DeSantis said.

But Schumer said that based on current state law, special districts that dissolve will transfer their debt to local governments.

A d

“Until that changes, counties have to be prepared to take that on. And not only that, but support all the utilities that Reedy Creek currently runs and plays with its special taxes,” Schumer said. “The only way I’m going to see Disney take on the tax for this without just taking over the law is to create a special district that’s more or less functionally identical to replace Reedy Creek.”

Copyright 2022 by WKMG ClickOrlando – All Rights Reserved.

]]>
Two missiles hit Ukrainian city of Zaporizhzhia, military administration says https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/two-missiles-hit-ukrainian-city-of-zaporizhzhia-military-administration-says/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 13:53:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/two-missiles-hit-ukrainian-city-of-zaporizhzhia-military-administration-says/ A view of the city council in Tiraspol, the capital of Transnistria, Moldova, November 25, 2021. (Alexander Hassenstein/UEFA/Getty Images) The self-declared republic of Transnistria – which has its own constitution, army, currency and flag but has never been recognized by the international community – could be drawn into Russia’s war in Ukraine. A senior Russian […]]]>
A view of the city council in Tiraspol, the capital of Transnistria, Moldova, November 25, 2021. (Alexander Hassenstein/UEFA/Getty Images)

The self-declared republic of Transnistria – which has its own constitution, army, currency and flag but has never been recognized by the international community – could be drawn into Russia’s war in Ukraine.

A senior Russian general said last week that the military was aiming for ‘full control’ of the eastern Donbas region and southern Ukraine – and access to Transnistria, the breakaway territory of neighboring country Moldova .

TASS quoted the acting commander of Russia’s Central Military District, Major General Rustam Minnekaev, as saying the goal was to create a land corridor between Donbass and Crimea, which Russia annexed in 2014.

On Monday, explosions took place in Tiraspol, the capital of Transnistria, in what Ukraine’s Defense Ministry called a “planned provocation” by Russian intelligence.

Here’s what you need to know about Transnistria and why it matters to Russia.

A small breakaway state: Transnistria is a narrow strip of land about 1,350 square miles, sandwiched between Ukraine and the rest of Moldova – only slightly larger than Rhode Island, the smallest state in the United States.

It is home to around half a million people, most of whom are Russian speakers.

A little history : Transnistria declared its independence from the former Soviet Republic of Moldova following a two-year war (1990-1992) that broke out with the collapse of the Soviet Union.

The Russians intervened to support Transnistria but never recognized it as an independent state. The conflict between the Moldovan government and the separatists ended with a ceasefire in 1992, but around 1,500 Russian troops have remained in Transnistria since then.

Russia eyeing Transnistria: Major General Minnekaev’s statement, outlining Russia’s strategy for the “second phase” of the war, caused immediate alarm from the Moldovan authorities, who summoned the Russian ambassador.

Statements on Transnistria are “baseless and contradict the position of the Russian Federation supporting the sovereignty and territorial integrity of the Republic of Moldova, within its internationally recognized borders”, the Moldovan Affairs Ministry has said. Foreign Affairs and European Integration.

He added that during the meeting with the Russian ambassador, Moldovan officials reiterated that the country was a “neutral state and that this principle must be respected by all international actors, including the Russian Federation”.

Role in the war: Some military analysts suspect Russia is relying on Transnistria for logistical support – and taking advantage of its strategic position to establish a land corridor along the Black Sea to capture the port city of Odessa.

Watch more here:

What is Transnistria?  - CNN Video
]]>
Ludhiana | GRP will auction 110 unclaimed vehicles on May 19 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/ludhiana-grp-will-auction-110-unclaimed-vehicles-on-may-19/ Sun, 24 Apr 2022 18:35:41 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/ludhiana-grp-will-auction-110-unclaimed-vehicles-on-may-19/ Years after being dumped in the backyard of Local Railway Police (GRP) Thana, the Railway Police will finally hold the auction of 110 unclaimed vehicles on May 19. Railway police currently have 165 unclaimed vehicles in custody, 110 of which will be auctioned, including four cars, 42 scooters, four auto rickshaws and 60 motorcycles. Many […]]]>

Years after being dumped in the backyard of Local Railway Police (GRP) Thana, the Railway Police will finally hold the auction of 110 unclaimed vehicles on May 19.

Railway police currently have 165 unclaimed vehicles in custody, 110 of which will be auctioned, including four cars, 42 scooters, four auto rickshaws and 60 motorcycles.

Many vehicles involved in an accident have not been claimed by the relatives of the victims, fearing that it was bewitched. Owners of a few vehicles, which had been wrongly parked, never returned to pick them up after parking charges exceeded the cost of the vehicle amid Covid.

The auction was supposed to take place in October, but due to a strike by ministerial staff, the committee meeting was then postponed.

“GRP submitted numerous demands to the local government to declare the date of the auction, but the task was further delayed due to the Punjab assembly elections. In January, the Deputy Inspector General, GRP , Punjab, has asked the deputy commissioner of Ludhiana to set the auction date for the said vehicles, a GRP official said.

After much delay, a local court in January ordered the Government Railways Police (GRP) to immediately submit the list of unclaimed vehicles that had been lying in the backyard of the police station for many years and to accelerate their elimination.

A five-member committee consisting of the GRP Deputy Superintendent of Police, an Inspector, the Director of Punjab Roads Works, an official from the District Transport Office and another transport official set the base price of each vehicle to be auctioned.

According to officials, the base price for two cars has been set at 18,000 each, and the other two for 12,000 and 19,000, given their model and condition.

For three cars, it was set at 12,000 each, and for one to 13,000.

Additionally, the reserve price for two bullet motorcycles is 20,000 and for two Bajaj bikes, that’s 7,000. For the rest, it’s 5,000 each. The base price of the scooters will vary from 2,500 to 3,500.

Vehicles worth lakhs will be auctioned off to scrap dealers.

“Scrap dealers from any part of the state can participate in the auction. The auction will be attended by the five-member committee and other senior officials,” an officer said.

While cars and automobiles will be auctioned in one lot, there will be two lots of scooters and motorcycles auctioned.

The GRP will conduct the auction under Section 25 of the Police Act and Section 102 of the CRPC.

]]>
4 Democrats Seek Johnson’s 6th District Seat | News, Sports, Jobs https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/4-democrats-seek-johnsons-6th-district-seat-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 23 Apr 2022 04:35:31 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/4-democrats-seek-johnsons-6th-district-seat-news-sports-jobs/ LISBON — There are four Democrats vying for their party’s candidacy for the sixth U.S. congressional district seat currently held by U.S. Representative Bill Johnson, R-Marietta. Only two of the four responded to multiple interview requests with the newspaper – Eric S. Jones of Austintown and Louis G. Lyras of Campbell. The other […]]]>

LISBON — There are four Democrats vying for their party’s candidacy for the sixth U.S. congressional district seat currently held by U.S. Representative Bill Johnson, R-Marietta.

Only two of the four responded to multiple interview requests with the newspaper – Eric S. Jones of Austintown and Louis G. Lyras of Campbell. The other two names that will be on the ballot on May 3 are Martin Alexander of Boardman and Shawna Roberts of Belmont.

Eric S. Jones

Jones operates on a platform of putting the middle class first.

While big companies like Amazon apparently haven’t paid taxes for the past three or four years, Jones said people are working like crazy and paying extra taxes because of it. He is in favor of making only the first 40 hours of a person’s work taxable and making the extra money people make by working overtime tax exempt.

“People like my dad who work 50 hours a week, they’re put in a new tax bracket,” said Jones. “We have to reward hard work in this country.”

He would also like there to be no double taxation on social security. He points out that workers paid taxes on their money the first time, when they earned it, and wonders why additional taxes should be paid after retirement.

Additionally, it would change programs such as the Fallout Elimination Provision and Government Pension Offset, which reduce the amount of Social Security retirees if they worked for the state or local government. Jones said public servants like teachers, police officers and firefighters and their spouses shouldn’t lose the benefits they’ve earned.

Jones would also like to see student loans repaid only to the loan amount without interest. He believes that with the majority of students taking federal loans, the federal government should forgive the interest on those loans. Jones said the plan would put money back in the pockets of recent graduates and allow them to start buying homes sooner and spending more money, which helps the economy. Jones said a college education should not just be an investment in the student, but a public investment in the future.

If elected to Congress, Jones proposes creating term limits and banning members of Congress from investing in stocks. He wouldn’t eliminate bond investing because he said it still encourages Congress to do its best for the economy as a whole. Moreover, it would prohibit members of Congress from later serving as lobbyists for special interests.

Jones doesn’t believe trickle-down economics works, saying just because the boss gets a tax break doesn’t convince him to split the money. Instead, he believes the tax cuts should benefit the middle class, who will spend the money.

Finally, he would like to see more green energy investment in Ohio, allowing the United States to compete with China and Germany, both of which are investing heavily in green energy technology. As an example, Jones refers to China’s investments in new, safer nuclear technology. He would like to see a push for green energy and other products to be made in America, noting that American experts can outshine the rest of the world.

“I am not a career politician” said Jones. “I’m an ordinary guy racing for ordinary people. I don’t care if you’re Republican, Independent or Democrat, I’m trying to uplift all Americans.

Jones, who majored in history and political science and earned a master’s degree from Youngstown State University in computer information systems, said he would bring everyone’s concerns with him to the convention. Jones said he has both Democrats and Republicans in his family and was ready to walk down the aisle. He doesn’t take disagreements personally.

Louis G. Lyras

Lyras started a business painting bridges, factories, and power plants on the Ohio River and co-owns the Penguin City Beer Company. For his platform, he presents a list of what he calls “Kitchen Problems” which he says makes sense to locals.

During his years as a businessman, Lyras said he worked with unionized employees, changed his industry with new technologies and safety measures, and traveled to other industrialized countries like China.

He wants to see American taxpayers’ money flow back into downtown areas, bringing people and businesses downtown instead of seeing them migrate outside.

“I’ve always been a believer that we can’t let big cities die and we can’t let beautiful farmland become developments while cities fall into disrepair,” Lyras said.

In addition, he favors schools offering more courses in civics, basic accounting and trades. He questions the schools’ push to build new high schools when he believes so many of them need to be consolidated with other schools. That way, instead of many schools graduating only 30 people, the largest school could offer more students, including trades courses.

Lyras would also like to see the consolidation of county and city departments, combining taxpayer dollars for larger police and fire departments that span multiple cities in the same region or county.

Lyras expressed concern about the recent rise in inflation, but feels it is important that we do not try to fight inflation by lowering employee wages. Instead, it supports lowering the cost of goods and services by government and business.

At 71 and in good health, Lyras said he believes he has the business skills and life experiences to beat someone like Johnson in the November election. Lyras said he would favor term limits with three or four terms in the House and no more than three terms in the Senate.

“I’m not doing this because I’m going to retire on this”, said Lyras, adding that it would cost him more than he would earn. “I sincerely feel that I have to give back.”

He supports women’s right to choose, the idea that gender cannot be defined as just male or female, and the rights of workers to unionise.

Although in 2018 he failed to obtain the signatures required to run as an independent and the last time he ran for the office he ran as a Republican, Lyras said that he didn’t like what happened in 2020, and especially January 6, and has decided to run now as a Democrat.

“I’ve always been like this” Lyras said, adding that he liked that as a Democrat he was free to express all his opinions. “I think tax issues are important. We have to move things forward. »

He would like to see energy independence in the county involving more than just developing or using more fossil fuels, including nuclear, wind, solar and new technologies in electric vehicles.

Lyras said lawmakers need to realize things are too partisan now and they need to work together and compromise when they can.

djohnson@mojonews.com




Today’s breaking news and more to your inbox









]]>