Local Government – Milwaukee County First http://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 12:30:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-7-1.png Local Government – Milwaukee County First http://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/ 32 32 Cleveland Fed Report: Cleveland’s Stimulus Money Equivalent to Roughly One Year of Tax Revenue Could Be ‘Transformational’ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/cleveland-fed-report-clevelands-stimulus-money-equivalent-to-roughly-one-year-of-tax-revenue-could-be-transformational/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/cleveland-fed-report-clevelands-stimulus-money-equivalent-to-roughly-one-year-of-tax-revenue-could-be-transformational/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 12:30:37 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/cleveland-fed-report-clevelands-stimulus-money-equivalent-to-roughly-one-year-of-tax-revenue-could-be-transformational/ CLEVELAND, Ohio – What difference could Cleveland’s $ 511 million, Cuyahoga County’s $ 239 million, and Ohio’s $ 5.4 billion US bailout make a difference in communities? According to a recent report from the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, we can find the answer by comparing a state or local government’s stimulus liquidity with its […]]]>

CLEVELAND, Ohio – What difference could Cleveland’s $ 511 million, Cuyahoga County’s $ 239 million, and Ohio’s $ 5.4 billion US bailout make a difference in communities?

According to a recent report from the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, we can find the answer by comparing a state or local government’s stimulus liquidity with its tax revenue for 2020. Cleveland’s windfall exceeds its 2020 tax revenue , while that of Cuyahoga County accounts for about 30% of its tax revenue and that of Ohio about 17%.

“When we hear that a county gets $ 500 million and a state gets $ 5 billion, both numbers sound pretty high, but what we don’t know is the change these allocations can create.” , we read in the report. “Scaling the annual tax revenues of our state or local government allows us to determine whether our [American Rescue Plan] the allocation could be transformational or just useful.

The researchers found that the ratios of stimulus money to 2020 tax revenue for almost all states are between 10% and 30%, with a median of 20%. Ohio is right in the middle of the pack, with a ratio of 16.8%.

For local authorities, the ratios were on average 25 to 45%. They ranged from less than 10% – which could help municipalities recoup some of the revenue lost during the pandemic – to well over 100%, “an amount that could create a unique opportunity to invest more than one. equivalent of a whole year of tax revenue without incurring new debt, ”the report said.

Cleveland’s ratio is 100.7%, according to the report.

East Cleveland has the highest ratio in the state with a staggering 258.5% rate. According to the report, only 17 cities in the country had ratios above 200%.

Cleveland’s ratio is also behind a handful of other cities in northeast Ohio, including Warren at 145.8%, Youngstown at 110.4%, Lorain at 110.3%, Lakewood at 107.7%. and Barberton at 102.8%.

Cleveland has the highest ratio of major cities in Ohio, with Dayton at 90%, Toledo at 80.7%, Cincinnati at 48.3%, and Columbus at 18.6%.

The other ratios of cities in northeastern Ohio are: Cleveland Heights (92.9%), Canton (90.8%), Euclid (76.6%), Alliance (66.7%), Akron ( 63.5%), Elyria (45.6%), Green (41.9%), Parma (37.5%), Kent (35%), Cuyahoga Falls (32.4%) and Mentor (6.9 %). Mentor has the lowest ratio in the state.

Learn more about the amount of stimulus money cities in Northeast Ohio are receiving.

Counties across the country had a median ratio of 24%, but counties in Ohio had a median of 52%. Cuyahoga County was among the lowest ratios in the state at 29.6%, similar to other large counties – Franklin at 29.4% and Hamilton at 30%. Geauga County had the seventh lowest ratio at 34%.

Lorain County had the highest ratio of Greater Cleveland at 57.6%. Portage and Medina counties each had about 52.2%, Summit County’s ratio was 50.4%, and Lake County’s was 42.4%.

Warren County in southwest Ohio had the highest ratio in the state at 268%, making it one of 72 counties in the country with ratios above 100%.

The Cleveland Fed report only considers governments receiving stimulus funds directly from the US Treasury, which does not include small towns, townships or villages. The research also noted that the money for the US bailout was not distributed evenly among all communities. The amount a state received was based on its unemployment rate during the pandemic; county funds were distributed on a per capita basis, unless the per capita amount was less than the amount the county would receive under the block grant formula for community development; and municipal funds were allocated solely on the basis of CDBG formulas, which take into account factors such as population, poverty rates and housing conditions.

Governments must allocate their stimulus funds by the end of 2024 and spend them by the end of 2026. Permitted uses include spending for revenue recovery; grants to households, businesses and non-profit organizations affected by the pandemic; increasing the wages of essential workers; or invest in public health, water supply or broadband infrastructure. While the permitted uses are quite broad, the US Treasury may force the refund if the money is used inappropriately, such as paying for a proposed project before 2020 that has no connection with the pandemic recovery.


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Louisiana opioid settlement money will go to local governments https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/louisiana-opioid-settlement-money-will-go-to-local-governments/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/louisiana-opioid-settlement-money-will-go-to-local-governments/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 22:54:08 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/louisiana-opioid-settlement-money-will-go-to-local-governments/ BATON ROUGE, Louisiana (AP) – Louisiana intends to share the $ 325 million it expects to receive from a national settlement opioid epidemic prosecutions to parish sheriffs and local governments to provide addiction treatment, intervention and recovery services, Attorney General Jeff Landry said Wednesday. The Republican attorney general has announced that he has reached a […]]]>

BATON ROUGE, Louisiana (AP) – Louisiana intends to share the $ 325 million it expects to receive from a national settlement opioid epidemic prosecutions to parish sheriffs and local governments to provide addiction treatment, intervention and recovery services, Attorney General Jeff Landry said Wednesday.

The Republican attorney general has announced that he has reached a tentative agreement with organizations representing Louisiana sheriffs, police juries and municipalities that will govern how the money will be divided and spent.

“We want 100% of the funds to go to aid those affected,” Landry said at an event with representatives of local government associations and lawyers involved in the deal.

Attorney General said Louisiana is set to receive $ 18 million per year for 18 years as part of a $ 26 billion deal involving 42 states to settle opioid abuse lawsuits involving three of the largest corporations drug distribution company and drug maker Johnson & Johnson.

Opioids have been linked to more than 500,000 deaths in the United States since 2000.

Under the deal Landry announced on Wednesday, the Louisiana Department of Health and other state agencies will not receive any part of the settlement money except for administrative fees related to counseling. reduction in opioids. This council will review the facility’s money spending by local agencies to ensure that they are following the guidelines under which the money goes to drug treatment.

Officials from the state’s 64 parishes have yet to sign the agreement, but support from local government organizations should help secure those signatures. Walter Leger Jr., a private attorney who worked on the settlement, said the state has about three months to get the required signatures from sheriffs, parish councils and other local officials.

Once the administrative fee is waived, sheriffs will receive 20% of the money, while parishes, towns and villages will share the remaining 80%.

The amount each municipality will receive will be set using a nationally designed formula that uses the population and the number of opioid prescriptions and opioid-related deaths among residents, Léger said.

Louisiana’s Office of the Legislative Auditor will be able to audit local government spending to confirm that it is following state guidelines.

Landry said dollars are not enough to tackle the widespread problem of opioid abuse, “but hopefully this is a step forward.” His office said if other lawsuits against pharmaceutical companies over the opioid crisis were resolved, those settlement dollars could also go into the formula for local government agencies.

The Attorney General was joined at his press conference by Danny Schneider from the Netflix TV series “The Pharmacist,” which documents Schneider’s fight against the opioid epidemic. Schneider praised the national regulation and Louisiana’s plans to spend the money.

“We don’t want this to go into potholes. We want this to go for treatment and recovery, ”he said.

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Follow Melinda Deslatte on Twitter at http://twitter.com/melindadeslatte.



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Ohio bill would ban gun store closures during states of emergency https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/ohio-bill-would-ban-gun-store-closures-during-states-of-emergency/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/ohio-bill-would-ban-gun-store-closures-during-states-of-emergency/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 11:02:32 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/ohio-bill-would-ban-gun-store-closures-during-states-of-emergency/ Thousands of Ohio businesses were forced to close during the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, but gun stores were not one of them. Gov. Mike DeWine has exemptions in his stay-at-home orders for gun stores and other “essential businesses” like gas stations, grocery stores and hospitals. Republican lawmakers say DeWine got this part of […]]]>

Thousands of Ohio businesses were forced to close during the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, but gun stores were not one of them.

Gov. Mike DeWine has exemptions in his stay-at-home orders for gun stores and other “essential businesses” like gas stations, grocery stores and hospitals.

Republican lawmakers say DeWine got this part of the shutdown right, and they want to make sure another governor couldn’t decide otherwise.

This is why Senator Tim Schaffer, R-Lancaster, introduced Senate Bill 185. The bill, which was passed in committee Tuesday afternoon, would prohibit local governments in Ohio from closing gun stores during a declared state of emergency. And it would prohibit the police from confiscating weapons, invalidating concealed carrying permits or closing shooting ranges.


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Spanberger presses White House on infrastructure | Local government https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/spanberger-presses-white-house-on-infrastructure-local-government/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/spanberger-presses-white-house-on-infrastructure-local-government/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 23:15:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/spanberger-presses-white-house-on-infrastructure-local-government/ The legislation would provide $ 7 billion for the Virginia freeways and $ 537 million for the replacement and repairs of the Virginia Bridge over five years. The state has 577 bridges and more than 2,124 miles of highways in poor condition. Support local journalism Your subscription makes our report possible. {{featured_button_text}} “I am really […]]]>

The legislation would provide $ 7 billion for the Virginia freeways and $ 537 million for the replacement and repairs of the Virginia Bridge over five years. The state has 577 bridges and more than 2,124 miles of highways in poor condition.

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“I am really excited about the infrastructure bill because its impacts will be significant and clear,” said Spanberger. “This is a bill that makes real investments.

According to his office, the bill would provide $ 1.2 billion over five years to improve public transportation in Virginia.

The infrastructure bill would also make great strides in providing Virginia households with high-speed internet access, an essential public service, Spanberger said.

“Here in Central Virginia, I am excited about its tremendous prospects for broadband,” she said.

Combined with the efforts of the administration of Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, Spanberger said the infrastructure bill “would really put broadband on a rocket-like trajectory, providing high-speed connectivity across the Commonwealth.”

The measure would allocate $ 100 million to expand broadband Internet in Virginia. More than 1.9 million Virginians would be eligible for an Expanded Affordability Connectivity Allowance, which will help low-income families access high-speed internet.


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Heart of Iowa Helps Homeowners | News, Sports, Jobs https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/heart-of-iowa-helps-homeowners-news-sports-jobs/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/heart-of-iowa-helps-homeowners-news-sports-jobs/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 05:24:22 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/heart-of-iowa-helps-homeowners-news-sports-jobs/ -Photo submitted Deterioration is evident in the shingles of this local house. Money from the Heart of Iowa Regional Housing Trust Fund paid for the necessary repairs. As any homeowner knows, it doesn’t take long for maintenance and repair costs to add up. And if the roof starts to leak or the furnace goes out, […]]]>

-Photo submitted

Deterioration is evident in the shingles of this local house. Money from the Heart of Iowa Regional Housing Trust Fund paid for the necessary repairs.

As any homeowner knows, it doesn’t take long for maintenance and repair costs to add up.

And if the roof starts to leak or the furnace goes out, a homeowner is immediately looking at thousands of dollars in bills. For some, especially the elderly and disabled, it is simply not possible to pay for the necessary repairs.

But as of 2019, those in this position have a potential new source of help – the Heart of Iowa Regional Housing Trust Fund.

Since its inception, the Housing Trust Fund has invested $ 1,104,170 in homes in Webster and Hamilton counties.

This total includes $ 905,378 from the state government, with the remainder coming from local matching funds.

-Photo submitted

New shingles provide a solid roof for this area home after money from the Heart of Iowa Regional Housing Trust Fund paid for the roof replacement.

“It’s a big project,” said Fort Dodge City Councilor Kim Alstott.

The trust fund uses money from government and private sources to provide financial assistance to people who own single-family homes and account for up to 80 percent of the region’s median income. Priority is given to people with an income equal to or less than 30% of the region’s median income, people with disabilities and those aged 62 or over.

Help isn’t exactly handout, however. The money comes in the form of homeowner loans. These are five-year interest-free loans that will be canceled for those who stay at least five years in the house where the money was invested.

Since 2019, the trust fund has provided the money to complete 22 projects in Webster County, all but four in Fort Dodge.

15 other projects were funded in Hamilton County.

Each project can consist of one or more repairs. For example, a project might consist of a new roof and a new front door on a house.

Roofing and guttering work represent a large part of the projects. In Webster County, the trust paid for 12 roof and gutter jobs.

Other reparations funded by the trust include:

• Eight window replacement projects

• Five furnace or air conditioner replacements

• Five bathroom renovations accessible to people with reduced mobility

• Four plumbing projects

• Four door replacements

• Three electrical service repairs

• Three retaining walls

• two floor covering repairs

• Two support or basement wall projects

• An insulation project

• A water heater replacement

Alstott said projects funded by the Heart of Iowa Regional Housing Trust Fund help people stay in their homes. It also helps prevent these homes from deteriorating to the point that the municipal government has to demolish them, he said.

Houses restored to good condition through a trust fund project will remain a valuable part of the city’s housing options, according to the city councilor.

“It will be affordable housing that people can move into,” he said.

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County Durham’s takeover bid could further divide the northeast region https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/county-durhams-takeover-bid-could-further-divide-the-northeast-region/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/county-durhams-takeover-bid-could-further-divide-the-northeast-region/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 10:04:47 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/county-durhams-takeover-bid-could-further-divide-the-northeast-region/ Durham CC is seeking to strike its own deal with the county, potentially adding further fragmentation to devolution agreements in the northeast region. Decentralization in the northeast was complicated when the North of Tyne Combined Authority (NTCA) was formed in 2018, with Jamie Driscoll (Lab) becoming elected mayor the following year. This covers Northumberland, Newcastle […]]]>

Durham CC is seeking to strike its own deal with the county, potentially adding further fragmentation to devolution agreements in the northeast region.

Decentralization in the northeast was complicated when the North of Tyne Combined Authority (NTCA) was formed in 2018, with Jamie Driscoll (Lab) becoming elected mayor the following year.

This covers Northumberland, Newcastle City Council and North Tyneside MBC, but not the South Tyne councils – dividing the metropolitan area of ​​Tyne and Wear in half.

A coalition of Liberal Democrats, Tories and various independent groups moved Labor for the first time in a century last May to Durham, although Labor still controls the rest of the region except for the conservative Northumberland CC .

Mr Driscoll previously hoped to unite the North East authorities into a single municipal authority combined with a single devolution deal, but his hopes have now been dashed by Durham’s apparent decision to go it alone with a county deal.

Durham leader Amanda Hopgood (Lib Dem) said: “Durham’s position is that we have registered an expression of interest with the government on the possibility of a county deal for County Durham. We have been informed that we will have no further news until October. She declined to say what powers Durham would seek.

But Graeme Miller (Lab), head of Sunderland City Council, said the seven councils in the area still have not agreed on a way forward and “it’s not clear what Durham wants to do, they could seek their own agreement, join us or join Tees Valley “.

“It’s a new administration and we have to give them time.”

He said that a possible decentralization offer would be made by councils that choose to participate, because “what we don’t want to do is run out of the infrastructure and regeneration funds available, but there is not a lot of details about it yet “.

Cllr Hopgood told LGC that “Mayor Driscoll and the rest of the leaders within the [region] are fully aware of our position ”.

Mr Driscoll told LGC that authorities are still working together to try to secure transport funding through the new City Region Sustainable Transport Regulation (CRSTS), which the government says it is making available. of eight combined municipal authority areas – including the northeast.

Described by the government as an ‘unprecedented investment in local transport networks’, the fund is worth at least £ 4.2bn and more in the coming years for highway maintenance, including repairing nests -of chicken.

“We’ll see where we are with that,” Driscoll said.

“Durham told me they were driving the county road alone. So good luck to them. I had a good conversation with our leaders and told them, “if you want help, if you want me to talk to ministers, I can do it” – but it’s their decision, not mine.

“But when everyone sees how well we are doing in North Tyne, they’ll all want the same things we have.”

South Tyneside chief Tracey Dixon (Lab) echoed Driscoll’s comments, saying “the key issue for South Tyneside right now is for the North East to access proposed transport funding”.

“The region has a common vision for improving transport to support the creation of high quality jobs, improve equality of access, improve public health and help decarbonize our economy.” , she said.

“We have existing and appropriate governance arrangements in place for the administration of transportation funding and look forward to receiving our allocation earmarked for the sustainable transportation settlement of the government city region as well as our invitation to bid for funds urgently. . “

Cllr Dixon said the joint NTCA and North East Combined Authority transport committee – in which the South Tyne councils remain – was “the only decision-making body through which the two combined authorities in the region perform their transport functions, [it] is an appropriate governance model for the administration of transport finance. It is established in law and has a strong delivery history. No other arrangement is required.


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State Funding Shifts To Growing Urban Counties From SC To The Detriment Of Rural People | New https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/state-funding-shifts-to-growing-urban-counties-from-sc-to-the-detriment-of-rural-people-new/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/state-funding-shifts-to-growing-urban-counties-from-sc-to-the-detriment-of-rural-people-new/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/state-funding-shifts-to-growing-urban-counties-from-sc-to-the-detriment-of-rural-people-new/ Now that the 2020 census figures are official, South Carolina’s fastest growing counties will receive more public funding, as the money is tied to population changes. This is good news for the growing countries led by Horry and Berkeley. But their gains will be losses for South Carolina’s declining rural counties, some of which are […]]]>

Now that the 2020 census figures are official, South Carolina’s fastest growing counties will receive more public funding, as the money is tied to population changes.

This is good news for the growing countries led by Horry and Berkeley.

But their gains will be losses for South Carolina’s declining rural counties, some of which are struggling to attract residents and a tax base.

Counties including Orangeburg and Florence will see some of their state aid cut and given to rapidly growing counties.

“The great counties will get away with this no matter what,” Republican state treasurer Curtis Loftis said. “The same counties that were poor when I was a kid 65 years ago are getting poorer, and it’s heartbreaking.”

Think of state aid, known as Local Government Funds, as a cake that 46 counties share based on their population. Counties can only get larger slices if other counties get smaller slices.

As of this month, 11 counties will receive a larger share of the fund. They are: Horry, Berkeley, York, Greenville, Charleston, Spartanburg, Lancaster, Dorchester, Beaufort, Lexington and Jasper.






Horry County’s beaches along the Grand Strand attract tourists, but the county’s population has also grown by more than 30% from 2010 to 2020, and the county’s share of state aid will rise by more than 2.1 million dollars as a result. File / Richard Caines / Staff




The remaining 35 counties all have a population that grew less than the state average, and two dozen of them had fewer people in 2020 than in 2010. South Carolina’s population grew by 10 , 7% over the decade.

Horry County, home to the Myrtle Beach area, will get the biggest annual funding due to population growth – an additional $ 2.1 million. Orangeburg County will lose the most; $ 738,552.

“If you’re Horry, you say that of course is what should happen because they’ve got more people,” said Tim Winslow, executive director of the SC Association of Counties.

While Sorry County will see the largest population gain in state funding, it accounts for just 1% of the county’s budget, a spokesperson said.

Once a coastal phenomenon, hotspots of population growth have spread throughout South Carolina

In Berkeley County, which is the second-biggest winner behind Horry, officials said the county has been paying to serve a growing population since 2010 and it is good that state funding is now catching up.

“Every department in the county is affected by growth and we need to keep pace,” said Berkeley supervisor Johnny Cribb. “Even after this increase, Berkeley County is expected to grow from 6,000 to 8,000 (people) next year, and it will be another 10 years before the number is increased again.”






nexton Apr2017.jpg (copy) (copy) (copy)

Part of the Nexton community in Berkeley County under construction on April 20, 2017. The county’s rapid population growth will result in increased state funding, approximately $ 1.3 million per year after the 2020 census. File / Staff




For Berkeley, the 2020 census is worth an additional $ 1.33 million per year. This represents about 1.3 percent of the county’s annual budget.

“Every year, just for us to give our employees an increase in the cost of living and keep up with the increase in health insurance, it costs more than that,” Cribb said.

The County of Florence would like to have an additional $ 1.3 million. Instead, this county will lose $ 590,434 according to the SC Revenue and Fiscal Affairs Office.

“Half a million dollars is substantial when you look at it,” said Florence KG County Administrator “Rusty” Smith Jr.

He said fortunately the state has approved a new fund to help slow growing rural counties this year, which will offset part of the loss of the Local Governments Fund.

“I think that in the end, Florence County will lose money but not all of it,” Smith said.

Census Shows City and County of Charleston Losing Black Residents

Winslow said the new Rural County Stabilization Fund is not meant to be a substitute, but for some counties it “compensates for the sting of lost income due to population.”

Changes in county funding related to the census traditionally occurred in July of the year after the census was taken, at the start of the state’s fiscal year. This time, because census figures are released later than usual, counties will see the change in their state aid payments in October when the second quarter payments go to counties.

“In the past, when the census was released in April, counties had at least some idea of ​​what the change would be,” said Frank Rainwater, executive director of the SC Revenue and Fiscal Affairs Office.

The Census Bureau’s annual population estimates have long indicated that money would be redistributed from rural counties to urban counties in South Carolina when the 2020 census was completed.

Demographic shifts could shift millions of public funds from rural counties to fast-growing ones

What counties didn’t know until recently was how much the Local Government Fund – the pie – could grow before it was cut.

This year, the total fund increased by $ 17.92 million, to reach $ 251.66 million, relieving the pain of small counties somewhat and adding to the momentum gained by the 11 largest counties. .

Smith, in Florence County, said he was happy the Rural County Stabilization Fund has emerged this year. Without it, the loss of $ 590,434 in state aid due to the census count “would be devastating.”

Census Shows City and County of Charleston Losing Black Residents

Slow growing and losing population counties have benefited from the fact that state funding is only adjusted every ten years, as they have been collecting state aid for years based on the former population.

Meanwhile, rapidly growing counties have had to provide services to growing populations while their aid is adjusted.

Cribb said more residents means a county needs more sheriff’s assistants and emergency medical workers, more deeds to register, and more services of all kinds.

“A million (dollars) coming from anywhere absolutely helps,” he said.

Now that state aid shares have been reset, the cycle begins again, with 10 years before the cake is cut after the 2030 census.


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Counties in the region will not need COVID-19 vaccine for government employees | Local News https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/counties-in-the-region-will-not-need-covid-19-vaccine-for-government-employees-local-news/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/counties-in-the-region-will-not-need-covid-19-vaccine-for-government-employees-local-news/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 04:15:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/counties-in-the-region-will-not-need-covid-19-vaccine-for-government-employees-local-news/ All employees of the Allegheny County government executive will soon need to be vaccinated against COVID-19, but don’t expect neighboring counties to follow suit. County manager Rich Fitzgerald announced on Wednesday that workers under his leadership will either need to be fully immunized by December 1 or face dismissal, although the order does not include […]]]>

All employees of the Allegheny County government executive will soon need to be vaccinated against COVID-19, but don’t expect neighboring counties to follow suit.

County manager Rich Fitzgerald announced on Wednesday that workers under his leadership will either need to be fully immunized by December 1 or face dismissal, although the order does not include other employees, such as those who work in the courthouse.

“As we continue to see cases of COVID in our county and different populations are affected than before, it is even more important that our workforce is protected so that the public we serve is also protected,” Fitzgerald in a written statement. “This is the right thing for our county and our workforce. “

About 75% of all workers in the executive branch of the county government are already fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to county officials. The county began requiring that all new recruits be vaccinated starting in August.

While officials in the Fayette, Greene and Washington counties have said they are monitoring the situation, there are no plans to force a vaccine on their officials.

However, Washington County offered a half-day sickness “incentive” to anyone who could prove they were vaccinated, which officials said was to give workers time to get vaccinated. So far, 314 workers out of around 860 part-time and full-time employees have presented proof of vaccination, although county human resources manager Shelli Arnold said the number could be higher because they do not. are not required to show their status. But even with just 36% of the county’s workforce known to be vaccinated, there are no plans to impose it.

Commission chairperson Diana Irey Vaughan said they follow state and federal health guidelines and require unvaccinated workers to self-quarantine at home if they come in contact with a person being tested positive for COVID-19. If an unvaccinated employee is short on time, then that worker must use the county sick leave during their absence.

“They really work on the front lines and are with people every day,” said Irey Vaughan.

Although they do not require the vaccine, Irey Vaughan and fellow Commissioners Nick Sherman and Larry Maggi are trying to set an example for county employees by getting the vaccine themselves. Irey Vaughan and Sherman announced in April that they were getting the shot, while Maggi received his two doses last summer while participating in Pfizer’s clinical trial in Columbus, Ohio. Maggi said last week that he still had not received a booster shot while he remained in the trial.

“Choosing to get the vaccine for us was trying to set an example,” said Irey Vaughan, adding that she had also recently received a flu shot. “We have a very strong wellness program (in Washington County). My opinion, for me, was that the COVID vaccine was another step for well-being. “

Greene County Chief Clerk Jeff Marshall said there were no plans to require the vaccine for county employees, which would be a decision that would ultimately rest with the commissioners. Marshall added that county leaders do not “follow” employee vaccination statuses, or ask to see vaccination cards.

“We take a day-to-day assessment and see how things are going,” Marshall said. “They watch it daily, but nothing is imminent.”

Greene County Commission Chairman Mike Belding said they recommend employees follow federal and state health guidelines, but they have no plans to go beyond since County No. does not have its own health service. If the guidelines from those agencies change, the county will notify its workers of the updated policies, he said.

“This has been our position from the start. We don’t have a health department in the county, so we refer them to the proper authorities (agencies) above us… and we leave it at that, ”Belding said.

The county does not expect to offer an incentive program for employees to get vaccinated, Belding said, as vaccines are now widely available. He declined to disclose if he had been vaccinated, preferring to keep this information private.

“The vaccine has been available for so long, I can’t imagine they didn’t have time to go get it. I don’t see an obligation to do it, ”Belding said. “They can make their own decisions. “

Belding’s counterpart in Fayette County Commission Chairman Dave Lohr agreed, saying there would be no tenure for government employees there.

“I am not going to mandate,” Lohr said while stressing that he was speaking for himself and not on behalf of the other two commissioners. “I think it’s each person’s choice (whether) to get vaccinated or not. It’s my opinion.”

Fayette County Human Resources Director Cristi Spiker reiterated this in an emailed statement, saying they will continue to follow federal rules as they currently stand.

“Federal vaccine mandates are being developed under OSHA,” Spiker said. “Local and state governments are not subject to OSHA regulations, so the county will not have to comply.”


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Gableman issues first apparent subpoenas in Wisconsin election review | Local government https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/gableman-issues-first-apparent-subpoenas-in-wisconsin-election-review-local-government/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/gableman-issues-first-apparent-subpoenas-in-wisconsin-election-review-local-government/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 17:00:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/gableman-issues-first-apparent-subpoenas-in-wisconsin-election-review-local-government/ “Ensuring that the 2020 elections were held in a fair and legal manner is of critical importance to maintaining confidence in our electoral system,” Vos said in a statement. “Judge Gableman is dedicated to seeking the truth and has determined that subpoenas are necessary to advance his investigation. Assembly Republicans will continue to work with […]]]>

“Ensuring that the 2020 elections were held in a fair and legal manner is of critical importance to maintaining confidence in our electoral system,” Vos said in a statement. “Judge Gableman is dedicated to seeking the truth and has determined that subpoenas are necessary to advance his investigation. Assembly Republicans will continue to work with Judge Gableman to ensure that confidence is fully restored in our elections. “

The entire review, along with the subpoenas, has been criticized by Democratic lawmakers.

“By issuing these subpoenas, it is now clear that President Vos is using all the powers at his disposal to appease far-right extremists,” said Representative Mark Spreitzer, D-Beloit, the leading member of the Assembly committee overseeing the review.

Last month, Republicans in the Legislature approved $ 680,000 in taxpayer dollars to fund the review. GOP lawmakers and Gableman also continued to send the message that the review is not driven by “political priorities,” although the investigation has no Democrats’ backing.

After serving on the Wisconsin Supreme Court from 2008 to 2018, Gableman was chosen by Vos to lead the investigation in June.

While awaiting approval of funds for the investigation, the former judge traveled to observe the Arizona election review and attended a symposium hosted by MyPillow CEO and conspiracy theorist Mike Lindell.


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Lancaster County Selects Man From Georgia As New Director Of Youth Services | Local government https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/lancaster-county-selects-man-from-georgia-as-new-director-of-youth-services-local-government/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/lancaster-county-selects-man-from-georgia-as-new-director-of-youth-services-local-government/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:40:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/lancaster-county-selects-man-from-georgia-as-new-director-of-youth-services-local-government/ The director of the Georgia Department of Juvenile Justice will be the new director of Lancaster County Youth Services. The Lancaster County Board of Directors voted unanimously on Thursday to offer the job to Steven Wesley, replacing longtime manager Michelle “Sheli” Schindler, who suddenly retired in March. Wesley will start in about 30 days and […]]]>

The director of the Georgia Department of Juvenile Justice will be the new director of Lancaster County Youth Services.

The Lancaster County Board of Directors voted unanimously on Thursday to offer the job to Steven Wesley, replacing longtime manager Michelle “Sheli” Schindler, who suddenly retired in March.

Wesley will start in about 30 days and be paid $ 115,000 a year to run the county juvenile detention center.

“We wanted a good change,” Lancaster County Board Chairman Rick Vest said after the vote. “I think we’ll see this.”

Vest noted Wesley’s extensive experience working with youth.






Steven Wesley, New Director of Lancaster County Youth Services Center


COURTESY PHOTO


“Its commitment to making an impact on the lives of young people aligns with County Council’s goal of reimagining and reshaping what Lancaster County does with juvenile justice and creating a redemptive experience for every resident of the youth service center. ”

Melissa Hood, the centre’s administrator, has served as interim director since Schindler left.

Schindler was director for 15 years and was deputy director under Dennis Banks, who left his post as director after 25 years to become a full-time minister.

The center, just south of the Nebraska State Penitentiary at 1200 Radcliff St., houses youth awaiting trial in the juvenile justice system. Other counties contract with Lancaster County to house their juvenile inmates.


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