Local Government – Milwaukee County First http://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/ Tue, 21 Sep 2021 14:22:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-7-1.png Local Government – Milwaukee County First http://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/ 32 32 5 things Houstonians need to know for Tuesday, September 21 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/5-things-houstonians-need-to-know-for-tuesday-september-21/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/5-things-houstonians-need-to-know-for-tuesday-september-21/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 14:22:10 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/5-things-houstonians-need-to-know-for-tuesday-september-21/ Here are things to know for Tuesday, September 21: 1.1 HPD officer killed, another wounded in northeast Harris County while serving warrant, authorities say One officer died and another was injured after a shooting in northeast Harris County. The incident happened around 7:30 a.m. at the Timber Ridge Apartments on Aeropark Drive near Crosswinds Drive, […]]]>

Here are things to know for Tuesday, September 21:

1.1 HPD officer killed, another wounded in northeast Harris County while serving warrant, authorities say

One officer died and another was injured after a shooting in northeast Harris County.

The incident happened around 7:30 a.m. at the Timber Ridge Apartments on Aeropark Drive near Crosswinds Drive, authorities said.

Houston Police Chief Troy Finner said William “Bill” Jeffrey and Sgt. Michael Vance of the HPD Major Offenders Unit was serving a high-level felony warrant there.

Upon their arrival, Finner said a woman suspected of having some sort of relationship with the suspect opened the door. At this point, Finner said the suspect immediately got out and opened fire on the officers.

Read more.

2. Man dies after being shot while driving on Westpark Tollway, police say

A man was killed Monday night after being shot while driving on the Westpark toll freeway, according to the Houston Police Department.

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The shooting was reported at around 7:24 p.m. in the 8800 block of Westpark Tollway, between Gessner and Fondren roads.

Police said the man was driving east when he was shot. He was taken to a nearby hospital where he later died.

Read more.

3. Search for suspects underway after 14-year-old was shot dead in Kingwood, MPs say

An investigation is underway after a 14-year-old boy was shot and killed in Kingwood on Monday, Montgomery County Sheriff’s Deputies said.

MPs said that at approximately 8:20 p.m. they were sent to N. King Mills Lane block 25000 for reports of gunfire.

During the investigation, MPs said they learned that a woman was walking on N. Kings Mill Lane when she heard several gunshots near the intersection of Pauldron Drive. According to investigators, the woman said she also saw two men fleeing the area.

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According to the deputies, the woman continued her walk when she came across an unconscious 14-year-old boy lying on the sidewalk, apparently with gunshot wounds. MPs said the woman called authorities.

Read more.

4. Governor Greg Abbott and local officials are waging several legal battles over mask warrants. Here’s what you need to know.

Texas Governor Greg Abbott is locked in several legal battles with cities, counties and school districts over their offers to require masks in public schools.

In an executive order in May, Abbott banned local governments from requiring people to wear masks.

But as the highly contagious delta variant of COVID-19 spread across Texas and the state’s vaccination rate stagnated, several public school and local government officials felt badly about it. comfortable with Abbott’s order – especially when schoolchildren too young to get vaccinated have returned to classrooms.

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Some local officials challenged Abbott and still issued mask warrants for schools. Others sued the state on Abbott’s orders. As dozens of legal battles continue, parents in Texas have found themselves in confusion over whether their children should dress up in school.

Read more.

5. Houston Texans QB Tyrod Taylor could be out for up to a month, KPRC 2 confirms

The Houston Texans could be without starting quarterback Tyrod Taylor for up to a month, KPRC 2’s Randy McIlvoy confirmed.

An NFL source told McIlvoy that Taylor is suffering from a major hamstring injury that could prevent him from playing the next four games, with future evaluations to determine a more precise schedule.

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Taylor sustained a hamstring injury in the first half of Sunday’s game against the Cleveland Browns – a game the Texans lost 31-21. It came after Taylor started the game 10-11 on his passes for 125 yards with a touchdown in the air, and also ran for a 15-yard rushing score to tie the game at 14-14. Rookie Davis Mills replaced injured Taylor and finished with a touchdown pass and an interception.

Read more.


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Governor Candidate Rebecca Kleefisch Tests Positive for COVID-19 | Local government https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/governor-candidate-rebecca-kleefisch-tests-positive-for-covid-19-local-government/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/governor-candidate-rebecca-kleefisch-tests-positive-for-covid-19-local-government/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 01:00:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/governor-candidate-rebecca-kleefisch-tests-positive-for-covid-19-local-government/ Former Lieutenant Governor Rebecca Kleefisch tested positive for COVID-19 on Friday, forcing the Republican gubernatorial candidate to cancel all upcoming campaign events just days after she launched her gubernatorial candidacy. Kleefisch DAILY PORTAGE REGISTER Kleefisch spokesman Alec Zimmerman confirmed in an email that Kleefisch, a colon cancer survivor, was exposed to the coronavirus while she […]]]>

Former Lieutenant Governor Rebecca Kleefisch tested positive for COVID-19 on Friday, forcing the Republican gubernatorial candidate to cancel all upcoming campaign events just days after she launched her gubernatorial candidacy.






Kleefisch


DAILY PORTAGE REGISTER


Kleefisch spokesman Alec Zimmerman confirmed in an email that Kleefisch, a colon cancer survivor, was exposed to the coronavirus while she was at church on September 12, three days after officially declared his candidacy. Kleefisch, who is vaccinated, was told of her exposure last Thursday and tested positive the next day.

“She feels great,” Zimmerman said. “We have canceled all upcoming events and are informing recent close contacts. Rebecca received the vaccine last spring.

Zimmerman said further details would not be available on Monday, but said the campaign canceled all in-person events for the remainder of the week. Virtual events, such as radio interviews, are expected to continue, he added.

In a video tweeted on Monday, Kleefisch said she was feeling well and was being quarantined by members of her family, who tested negative for COVID-19.

“We are following all COVID protocols and everything is fine,” Kleefisch said in the video.

Kleefisch launched his campaign earlier this month with the aim of toppling incumbent Democratic governor Tony Evers, who is running for a second term.


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The urgency of greater public investment https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/the-urgency-of-greater-public-investment/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/the-urgency-of-greater-public-investment/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 14:43:31 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/the-urgency-of-greater-public-investment/ Sep 20, 2021 “WI WORK to the limit, ”explains Apostolos Tsalastras, treasurer of Oberhausen, a town in the Ruhr valley. Like many places in this region, Oberhausen sits on a vast pile of debt, mostly accumulated when mines closed and steel jobs disappeared. The unemployment rate stands at 10.6%, almost double the national rate. Last […]]]>

“WI WORK to the limit, ”explains Apostolos Tsalastras, treasurer of Oberhausen, a town in the Ruhr valley. Like many places in this region, Oberhausen sits on a vast pile of debt, mostly accumulated when mines closed and steel jobs disappeared. The unemployment rate stands at 10.6%, almost double the national rate. Last year, Olaf Scholz, the SPD Minister of Finance (and his candidate chancellor), sought to relieve municipalities like Oberhausen of their old obligations, but was thwarted by his CDU coalition partner. “It’s time to make a fresh start,” argues Mr. Tsalastras. His city is locked in a vicious circle of declining investment, declining tax revenue and shrinking population.

A federal bailout helped most municipalities avoid disaster last year. But by 2023, many will face a budget crisis, says Jens Südekum, professor of economics at the University of Düsseldorf. Trade taxes which are their main independent source of income are volatile and covid-19 creates new demands. National laws limit their ability to cut current spending, one of Mr. Tsalastras’ scarecrows. This puts capital investment in the crosshairs.

The country’s 11,000 or so municipalities are responsible for a large part of public investment. The KFW, a state-backed development bank, puts the municipal investment backlog at 149 billion euros ($ 172 billion), a figure that has risen even as tax revenue has poured in. School buildings represent almost a third of the deficit; roads just under a quarter. Endlessly delayed mega-projects like Berlin Airport may have made the country a laughing stock, but it’s the rusty bridges, shaky phone signals and decrepit school toilets that form the basis of everyday conversation.

Ask anyone in local government what the problem is, and the answer is always people. A report by the Friedrich Ebert Foundation, which is linked to the SPD, notes a huge decrease in municipal staff over 30 years. Immigration has helped, but a quarter of the positions remain vacant, says Henrik Scheller, one of the authors. Planning and engineering are particularly affected, and local governments find it difficult to compete with private companies. Two-thirds of municipalities expect it to be even more difficult to find planners. Surveys show that construction companies are working at full capacity. With such supply constraints, spending more without proper planning may simply fuel inflation.

Bureaucracy and Nimbyism play a role. Businesses are grappling with a patchwork of planning and construction rules. Opponents are delaying public infrastructure projects with endless litigation. The number of projects blocked by citizens’ initiatives has doubled since 2000. This poses a problem for roads, railways and bridges. But it is a “real obstacle” to climate transformation, says Scheller. The recently revised climate law mandates a 65% reduction in carbon emissions from 1990 levels by 2030, and their net elimination 15 years later. The share of renewables in electricity production must also reach 65%. And global demand for electricity for batteries to power electric cars, for heat pumps in buildings and for “green” hydrogen to help decarbonize industry could increase by a quarter.

Agora Energiewende, a think tank, estimates that Germany will need to install 5GW of onshore wind power each year until 2030, and 7GW a year after that. In 2020, he only managed 1.4GW. A visit to Schleswig-Holstein shows how difficult it will be. By the early 1990s, wind power in this northern state began to revitalize what had been some of the poorest communities in western Germany. Today, turbines dot the landscape. Schleswig-Holstein a 8.5GW of installed wind capacity and produces 160% of the electricity it consumes from renewable energies. It can export the surplus via new power lines, including to Scandinavia.

In December, the state government released new rules for building wind farms, after a five-year moratorium imposed amid mounting local tensions. The new rules reserve 2% of the land for wind power, but that may not be enough to meet wind energy targets. Add in the long waiting times for permits and other restrictions and those goals seem unattainable, says Marcus Hrach of the Kiel branch of the German Wind Energy Association. Industry insiders despair of any hurdles they face. “Not many people here are against wind power, but those with strong voices,” says Anton Rahlf, a frustrated wind farm owner on Fehmarn, an island in Schleswig-Holstein.

Other states are even more restrictive. The rules to protect endangered species vary from state to state. A few years ago, litigation, regulation and complex tendering slowed the construction of wind farms at a breakneck pace, although 2021 offered faltering signs of a revival. The mismatch between the federal government’s ambitions and the reality of local regulation, according to Mr. Hrach, will prevent Germany from meeting its commitments under the Paris climate agreement.

Another challenge, says Alexander Reitzenstein of think tank Das Progressive Zentrum, is building the power lines needed to transport electricity from the windy north to industrial states in the south like Baden-Württemberg and Bavaria. Local communities can get a financial stake in wind farms, but this is more difficult for power lines that simply carry electricity. And in the German federal system, states cannot be controlled by the Berlin government. “Many politicians who agree on the climate in Berlin act differently when a line arrives at their local community,” said Tim Meyerjürgens, chief operating officer of TenneT, an electricity transmission operator, adding that the “salami tactics” of regular legislative changes undermine confidence.

There is a near consensus that the next government must do more to meet the vast needs for public investment. The debate is about how. For some, tackling the country’s austerity bias is a priority. The debt brake now enshrined in the constitution limits the possibilities of deficit spending. Critics of German austerity are legion. The European Central Bank has long urged countries with “fiscal space” to exploit it. But all of these suggestions have tended to run up against an austere wall of fiscal orthodoxy.

Excess austerity

Since 2013, the annual public investment budget has increased from around 93 billion euros to 137 billion euros. This, argues Jens Weidmann, head of the Bundesbank, suggests that the debt brake is “a bit of a straw man”. Better to tackle bureaucracy, capacity constraints and unstable municipal revenues by changing the federal structure. But Sebastian Dullien at IMK, a research group linked to a trade union in Düsseldorf, retorts that a guaranteed, long-term income stream of the same type as the debt brake could give city authorities, construction companies and engineers the certainty of planning they need to reduce bottlenecks and increase staff.

Last year, the government invoked a debt brake loophole to fund business support, holidays and other schemes during the pandemic, recording a 4.2% deficit from GDP. It will be bigger this year. The CDU / CSU wants to re-impose the debt brake once circumstances permit, probably in 2023. Mr. Scholz too, who presents himself as a safe pair of hands (much in his SPD wants a broader approach). The most interesting proposals come from the Greens, who want to add a “golden rule” allowing a ten-year debt-financed investment program of 500 billion euros, focused on climate and digital infrastructure.

Yet the two-thirds parliamentary majority required to change the constitution is a formidable obstacle. A more likely prospect is the creation of public investment companies, mainly ad hoc off-budget vehicles (SPVs), devoted to capital expenditure, for example, the provision of broadband services in schools or the modernization of railways. SPVIt is legally complicated and democratically uncertain, worries Mr. Südekum. They would incur borrowing costs at a time when investors are paying to lend to the federal government. But by not increasing the stock of public debt, they offer a way around the debt brake. The CDU / CSU the chancellor-candidate, Armin Laschet, flirted with what he calls Deutschlandfonds.

More radical ideas are looming, including a proposal from Dezernat Zukunft, a think tank led by Philippa Sigl-Glöckner, a former finance ministry official who calls SPVs “a declaration of defeat to stupid fiscal rules”. Dezernat Zukunft wants to shift the tax debate from arbitrary debt limits to the goal of full employment. The low overall unemployment rate, the group notes, masks the low participation rates of women and part-time workers looking for more hours.

Although the debt brake limits deficits to 0.35% of the GDP, the calculations are based on a complex estimate of “potential” output. In the short term, Dezernat Zukunft estimates that adjustments that require legal but unconstitutional tampering could allow more deficit spending worth € 50-60 billion per year. In the long term, Mrs Sigl-Glöckner hopes to remove the debt brake permanently. The fact that such ideas are now being taken seriously suggests that the tax debate has finally started to change.

Full content of this special report
Germany: after Merkel
The public sector: the urgent need for greater public investment*
Automotive industry: a difficult road awaits us
The demographic challenge: parts of the country are in desperate need of more people
The European dilemma: Angela Merkel will be sadly missed by the European Union
Merkelkinder: attitudes of young people
Foreign and security policy: the world needs a more active Germany
The future: Germany needs a reforming government

This article first appeared in the Special Feature section of the print edition under the title “Un trou d’Infrastructure”


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Kennedy School Lab to Launch Alternative 911 Response Initiative in Five Jurisdictions | New https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/kennedy-school-lab-to-launch-alternative-911-response-initiative-in-five-jurisdictions-new/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/kennedy-school-lab-to-launch-alternative-911-response-initiative-in-five-jurisdictions-new/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 03:40:53 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/kennedy-school-lab-to-launch-alternative-911-response-initiative-in-five-jurisdictions-new/ Harvard Kennedy School’s Government Performance Lab announced last week the selection of five domains that will participate in a new initiative to implement alternative responses to non-violent 911 calls. The initiative is supported by the Government Performance Lab at the Taubman Center for State and Local Government at the Kennedy School, which works with state […]]]>

Harvard Kennedy School’s Government Performance Lab announced last week the selection of five domains that will participate in a new initiative to implement alternative responses to non-violent 911 calls.

The initiative is supported by the Government Performance Lab at the Taubman Center for State and Local Government at the Kennedy School, which works with state and local governments to find solutions to various social problems. Starting this fall, the initiative will last approximately 12 months.

The GPL has selected Durham, NC, Harris County, Texas, Long Beach, California, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Phoenix, Arizona to participate in a program that will create or enhance unarmed emergency response teams that move away from traditional law enforcement by connecting residents to mental health, addiction treatment and other services.

The five jurisdictions were selected from a pool of applicants of over 60 across the country based on their level of ‘community and stakeholder engagement’, progress towards implementing alternative 911 responses and potential impact, as part of a growing shift across the country towards finding alternative approaches to public safety.

In a press release, GPL executive director Gloria Gong said she was excited about the potential for alternative responses to 911.

“It’s exciting to hear from communities across the country who are committed to shaping more responsive and fairer public safety systems, especially for communities of color who are often underserved by existing approaches,” said Gong said.

The GPL will provide technical assistance to accelerate and improve the implementation of alternative 911 interventions, including creating training programs for response teams, designing 911 call decision trees, preparing documents for emergency response. community information and purchasing services from local providers.

“Building alternative 911 intervention models can enable communities to provide a wider range of services to residents that better reflect the challenges they face and reduce the opportunities for unintentional harm,” Gong added.

Local government leaders also said they were eager to work with the GPL to improve public safety in their cities.

“We want the residents of Durham who call 911 to receive the most effective and appropriate response to meet their needs,” Durham Mayor Stephen M. Schewel said in the press release. “Sometimes it’s a police officer, and sometimes it’s a mental health worker or other trained, unarmed crisis responder.”

Other local leaders said the initiative is an opportunity to build on the progress they have already made.

“We are grateful to have had the opportunity to create another Crisis Response Team with the support of the Harvard Kennedy School Government Performance Lab,” said Long Beach Mayor Robert Garcia. “This effort builds on a long history of providing health-focused approaches to homeless and mentally ill people in Long Beach.”

—Editor-in-Chief Joshua S. Cai can be contacted at joshua.cai@thecrimson.com.

– Editor-in-Chief Eric Yan can be contacted at eric.yan@thecrimson.com.


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Bay City Commission to discuss potential salary increases at Monday’s meeting https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/bay-city-commission-to-discuss-potential-salary-increases-at-mondays-meeting/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/bay-city-commission-to-discuss-potential-salary-increases-at-mondays-meeting/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 12:02:58 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/bay-city-commission-to-discuss-potential-salary-increases-at-mondays-meeting/ BAY CITY, MI – The Bay City Commission will work on two items on the meeting’s agenda after the first September meeting was canceled due to tornado storms earlier this month. The Monday, September 20 meeting agenda includes potential salary increases for elected officials and ways to meet immediate community needs through the use of […]]]>

BAY CITY, MI – The Bay City Commission will work on two items on the meeting’s agenda after the first September meeting was canceled due to tornado storms earlier this month.

The Monday, September 20 meeting agenda includes potential salary increases for elected officials and ways to meet immediate community needs through the use of federal funding stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic.

On Monday, the committee is expected to consider whether or not to reject a salary increase presented to it.

According to information included in Monday’s agenda, the city’s compensation commission met on August 25 and is proposing a $ 500 pay rise to the city commissioners and the mayor.

The jump in the wage injury amounts to an increase of around 7.1% for the commissioners and 5.9% for the mayor.

Commissioners currently receive an annual salary of $ 7,000 while the mayor receives $ 8,500 per year. The increase would bring the commissioner’s salary to $ 7,500 and the mayor’s salary to $ 9,000, if accepted.

If the commission accepts the decision, the salary increase is expected to increase the general fund budget by $ 5,000 per year, according to the agenda item.

The Bay City Commission turned down a proposed salary increase in 2019. The Bay City Times previously reported that Commissioner Kristen Rivet previously raised concerns at the time about receiving such increases after citizens in the past came forward to say the various charges on bills had become a financial burden and that the high costs made it difficult to reside. in the city.

Bay City voters chose to pass a new city charter in the 2020 election, which sets out certain attendance requirements for commission members to receive a portion of their salary. The new charter ensured that 50% of an elected official’s salary was based on salary while the remaining 50% was calculated based on attendance at each meeting.

The proposed charter was adopted in 2019 with 1,892 “yes” votes out of 1,383 “no” votes and entered into force in January 2020.

Immediate financing needs

Another item on Monday’s busy agenda is an item related to the immediate disbursement of some of the funding the city is expected to receive from the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021.

Bay City has received a total of $ 31,076,578 from the plan, which aims to provide additional relief to deal with the continuing impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the economy, public health, state and local governments , individuals and businesses, as previously reported by MLive.

At their August 23 meeting, the Commissioners asked City Manager Dana Muscott to review the proposals submitted by community organizations and groups to determine if they met the criteria for urgent / immediate needs.

The commission reached a consensus to set aside $ 1.1 million in funding for these immediate needs, defined as situations and projects involving food, clean water, shelter, safety and mental health. To be eligible, these urgently needed projects must be less than $ 250,000, have passed a legal review and must not be eligible for other federal relief funds, according to the city.

The following projects will be considered for immediate funding need during the meeting:

  • Dow Bay Area Family Y Kitchen Project – $ 170,000
  • Hidden Harvest Truck Project – $ 25,000
  • Bay Veterans Foundation Workshop Learning Center – $ 190,000
  • Knights of Columbus lost income – $ 56,500
  • Bay City Public Schools, additional YMCA staff for MacGregor Elementary School – $ 46,000
  • Funding for Boys and Girls Clubs of the Bay of the Great Lakes Region – $ 240,000

The total proposed disbursement cost for the projects under review is $ 727,500.

However, the city said in the agenda item that it is still awaiting clarification on a number of the submitted proposals and that city staff will present an additional recommendation for the remaining funds at a future meeting. .

Bay City’s over $ 31 million ARPA allocation will be split into two parts: 50% received in 2021 and the remaining balance in 2022.

Depending on the city, the permitted uses of ARPA funding dollars are as follows:

  • To respond to the COVID-19 public health emergency or its negative economic impacts.
  • Respond to workers performing essential work during the COVID-19 pandemic by offering a bonus to eligible workers.
  • For the provision of government services to the extent of revenue reduction due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Make the necessary investments in water, sewer and broadband infrastructure.

Monday’s meeting is scheduled to start at 5:30 p.m. with the finance and policy portion of the meeting followed by the regular meeting at 6:30 p.m.

The full agenda package can be viewed here on the city’s website.

More from MLive

‘Unvaccinated people are dry tinder,’ Bay County health officials say as COVID-19 cases spread

Bay Town Commissioner Appointed New Bay County Clerk

Northern Bay Ambulance in Pinconning to receive over $ 73,000 in federal funding to improve safety

‘Our people are strong and determined,’ official says as Bay County grapples with shrinking and aging population

New census data shows a declining trend in Bay County’s population over the past decade

“If it’s raining, if it’s snowing, if it’s freezing, I’m staying up there,” says a pastor from Bay City who is preparing to stay on the roof of the church in November until she raises $ 50,000


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Pacilio Highlights In-depth Knowledge, Connections to Village and State Government Vying for Mayor of Sackets Harbor | Jefferson County https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/pacilio-highlights-in-depth-knowledge-connections-to-village-and-state-government-vying-for-mayor-of-sackets-harbor-jefferson-county/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/pacilio-highlights-in-depth-knowledge-connections-to-village-and-state-government-vying-for-mayor-of-sackets-harbor-jefferson-county/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 22:24:46 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/pacilio-highlights-in-depth-knowledge-connections-to-village-and-state-government-vying-for-mayor-of-sackets-harbor-jefferson-county/ SACKETS HARBOR – Mark A. Pacilio says he knows this village and he knows his government. That’s why he wants to become his next mayor. Mr Pacilio, a current village administrator who has been in and out of local politics since 1999, said he has seen the value and potential that can be realized when […]]]>

SACKETS HARBOR – Mark A. Pacilio says he knows this village and he knows his government. That’s why he wants to become his next mayor.

Mr Pacilio, a current village administrator who has been in and out of local politics since 1999, said he has seen the value and potential that can be realized when a local government works in the best interests of its people. voters. He wants to bring that spirit to the fore at Sackets Harbor.

“I think local government is one of the most important things in this country, because of its structure,” Mr. Pacilio said. “Local government is the level of government closest to you. “

The 57-year-old has a long history in the north of the country. Originally from Utica, he moved to Sackets Harbor in 1999 to work as Executive Director of the NNY Section of the American Red Cross and concurrently became President of the Sackets Harbor Chamber of Commerce.

He ran a number of businesses in the village with his wife and in 2003 was elected village administrator for the first time. After two terms, including one as deputy mayor, he became chief of staff to former MP Addie Jenne.

After the MP was removed from office in 2016, Mr. Pacilio returned to Sackets Harbor and in 2020 kept the promise he made when he visited Albany in 2008 – to return to the government of town. He was re-elected to the village board in 2020 and, in early 2021, announced his intention to run for mayor.

In addition to his work as an administrator, Mr. Pacilio is also an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Jefferson Community College in Watertown.

Mr. Pacilio said his experience here at home and in Albany prepared him to work with the right people to get things done for Sackets Harbor.

“I was proud, as a senior member of Addie Jenne’s staff we were noted in the assembly for our excellent work at the voter and local government level,” he said. “Work at the constituents level, a key part of it is understanding the region. “

In his mayoral bid, Mr Pacilio said he had a few key points he would like to bring to the attention of the village government. First, he said he wanted to see the village continue to support its tourism economy and facilitate coordinated efforts between downtown businesses.

He also said he wanted the Sackets Harbor building stock to continue to grow and the village should push to market itself as an attractive place to start a family.

“There are two active neighborhoods that are building houses, and two more are on the rise,” he said. “In total, four developments are opening their doors soon and we have to make the point that the residential community is growing.”

He said there was no problem with the village being a dormitory community for nearby Watertown or Fort Drum, as any residential growth will always help grow the economy of the village.

He pledged the transparency of village government and said his administration would keep in touch with the residents of Sackets Harbor on what is being done.

“I can tell you right away that you will receive regular communications from us, from the mayor, on things that are happening in this community,” he said. “There’s a lot to say, and we just aren’t doing it right now. “

Mr. Pacilio also wishes to devote time to village infrastructure. He said the village has generally maintained its facilities, streets, lights and water supply systems well so far, but it is important that they start saving now for large projects in the future. , namely the main water intake for Lake Ontario.

“We get our water from the lake, and that’s key because it gives us high quality water relatively easily,” he said, “but while we have that luxury, we have to make sure we maintain it. . “

He said the water intake is nearing the end of its useful life and the village’s sewage treatment plant will also need attention in the future.

Mr. Pacilio said he saw the maintenance of the village’s infrastructure as an integral part of the mayor’s job.

“Being mayor is not only having these big ideas to increase traffic downtown, it is also managing every part of our public works,” he said.

Mr. Pacilio said his long history in state politics, working in Albany, gave him a head start in handling intergovernmental affairs. With the wide range of state investments in Sackets Harbor, such as the Market Square Park renovation project funded by the REDI Commission, he said the village’s next mayor will need to have a good understanding of how to work with it. the state government.

Mr. Pacilio also has some ideas on how the village’s public safety mission can be better achieved. Sackets Harbor has a small police force, and Mr Pacilio said they don’t have the basic issues that some large towns have had with their officers, it is important for the village to think about the future of the police.

While some people in the village may suggest the police department can be done away with entirely, Mr Pacilio said he believes it is important to have a local police force, made up of people who live and work in Sackets Harbor and know their neighbors.

“The idea of ​​having a relationship with your local public security officers, it allows them to better understand the root of any problem and really solve it,” he said. “We must have a responsible public security service, accountable for its size and its actions.”

Mr. Pacilio won the support of the Democratic Party in his run for mayor during the June caucus. He will appear under two party lines on the Nov. 2 general election ballot – Democrat and Sackets Strong.

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South Africans urged to register for local elections as deadline approaches https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/south-africans-urged-to-register-for-local-elections-as-deadline-approaches/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/south-africans-urged-to-register-for-local-elections-as-deadline-approaches/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 09:09:23 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/south-africans-urged-to-register-for-local-elections-as-deadline-approaches/ Voters line up to vote in South Africa’s parliamentary and provincial elections in Alexandra Township, Johannesburg, South Africa, May 8, 2019. Mike Hutchings / Reuters FILE: Voters line up to vote in South Africa’s legislative and provincial elections, Alexandra Township, Johannesburg, South Africa, May 8, 2019. Mike Hutchings / Reuters Political parties, lawmakers and the […]]]>
Voters line up to vote in South Africa’s parliamentary and provincial elections in Alexandra Township, Johannesburg, South Africa, May 8, 2019. Mike Hutchings / Reuters
FILE: Voters line up to vote in South Africa’s legislative and provincial elections, Alexandra Township, Johannesburg, South Africa, May 8, 2019. Mike Hutchings / Reuters

Political parties, lawmakers and the electorate in South Africa have urged citizens to register for the next local or municipal elections by next Monday’s deadline, with more than 23,151 registration desks set to open this week. -end.

South Africa’s Election Commission announced on September 6 that voter registration will close on September 20, after a registration weekend of September 18-19, which will offer all eligible South African citizens the ability to register or update their registration information at all polling stations.

Municipal elections which take place every five years will elect leaders at the metropolitan, district and local levels in more than 200 municipalities across the country, which play a crucial role in delivering services that directly affect South African citizens in the country. day-to-day.

Fikile Xasa, chair of the Portfolio Committee on Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs of Parliament, on Friday called for maximum participation of all South Africans in elections, as local governments are the engine of service delivery in the system of South African State.

Xasa, in a statement released here, urged all eligible South Africans, especially young people, to register to vote while respecting COVID-19 protocols at registration stations.

The call came as the country’s two largest parties mobilized their supporters to register for the elections.

The African National Congress (ANC), which has been the ruling party since South Africa’s first democratic elections in 1994, announced on Thursday that South African President Cyril Ramaphosa, who is also ANC chairman, and d other party officials will encourage communities on the ground. to take advantage of the registration weekend and vote for the party.

He also announced that Ramaphosa and other ANC leaders will lead community engagement after the launch of the election manifesto on September 27 in Tshwane, the city that is home to the administrative capital of Pretoria.

The ANC reportedly failed to register all applicants in 93 municipalities, 35 of which were significantly affected, before the original deadline due to technical issues. The party, however, assured its members and supporters that it will register all candidates by September 21, when the electoral body reopens the candidatures.

The Democratic Alliance (DA), the second largest party, announced its weekend registration program on Friday, during which its top leader John Steenhuisen and other party members will also visit communities to mobilize residents.

Among the country’s major cities, DA, which is the largest party in Tshwane and Johannesburg, is seeking an absolute majority in Cape Town and Nelson Mandela Bay, Steenhuisen told Xinhua in an interview on Tuesday.


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City targets homeless campground ‘scourge’ | Government and Politics https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/city-targets-homeless-campground-scourge-government-and-politics/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/city-targets-homeless-campground-scourge-government-and-politics/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 19:45:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/city-targets-homeless-campground-scourge-government-and-politics/ There’s plenty of room in Elko Humanitarian Campground – not counting all the weeds – but new rules ordered by Elko City Council limit tent sizes to 20 by 20 feet and campsites to 35. by 35 feet. This photo was taken on September 13, before the tarpaulin ban. Jeff Mullins ADELLA HARDING Elko Daily […]]]>





There’s plenty of room in Elko Humanitarian Campground – not counting all the weeds – but new rules ordered by Elko City Council limit tent sizes to 20 by 20 feet and campsites to 35. by 35 feet. This photo was taken on September 13, before the tarpaulin ban.


Jeff Mullins



ADELLA HARDING Elko Daily Correspondent

ELKO – Revised rules will come into effect for the Elko Humanitarian Campground to improve the site by limiting the size of tents and removing tarps that spread over piles of things campers collect.

“Whenever I go out there and have conversations with 95% of the campers, the first thing they say is, ‘oh, I’m cleaning up my camp,’” Deputy City Manager Scott Wilkinson said. “A lot of material is transported there and they receive a tarpaulin to expand the site. “

He said they were continuing to “add, add and add,” and he hopes the new rules will give him the tools to resolve this issue at the Hot Springs Road site.

The tarp revisions state that “you cannot use tarpaulins attached to your tent to cover garbage, trash or other items in poor condition or in poor working order.” The new rules also limit the size of tents to 20 feet by 20 feet, and the camp area cannot exceed 35 feet by 35 feet.

The rules had previously stated that campers could not erect structures using boards or plywood. Only tents are allowed, but they can be erected on a platform made of plywood or other material. They also state that all property except bikes and grills must be inside the tents.






Elko humanitarian campsite

Weeds blanketed much of the city’s homeless campground on September 13, 2021.


Jeff Mullins



The revisions also eliminate the requirement that a fire marshal inspect wood stoves used on the campground, reducing the city’s liability in the event of a fire. Wilkinson said the change also means an inspector doesn’t have to enter the tents.


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Sheffield City region renames itself South Yorkshire https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/sheffield-city-region-renames-itself-south-yorkshire/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/sheffield-city-region-renames-itself-south-yorkshire/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 09:27:39 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/sheffield-city-region-renames-itself-south-yorkshire/ The region of the city of Sheffield changed its legal name to South Yorkshire Mayoral Combined Authority. He said the rebranding would better reflect the geography of the region it serves and be in line with its ongoing integration with the South Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive. Mayor-elect Dan Jarvis (Lab) will become Mayor of South […]]]>

The region of the city of Sheffield changed its legal name to South Yorkshire Mayoral Combined Authority.

He said the rebranding would better reflect the geography of the region it serves and be in line with its ongoing integration with the South Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive.

Mayor-elect Dan Jarvis (Lab) will become Mayor of South Yorkshire, which covers the areas of Sheffield City Council with the MBCs of Barnsley, Doncaster and Rotherham.

Mr Jarvis said: “As powers and resources have been transferred from Westminster to South Yorkshire, we can make decisions at the local level about our economy, our transport, our skills, our housing and our infrastructure, by us. ensuring that we can deliver what the local population needs and connect people and businesses where they need to be.

“We will use them to create a vibrant and prosperous South Yorkshire where people want to live, visit and work. A strong brand is crucial to achieving this ambition and we will use it to promote our region across the country and the world, to attract new investment and unleash the potential of our people, businesses and places – creating a stronger South Yorkshire, greener and fairer for everyone. “


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Lawyers Urge Indiana Lawmakers Not To Rush Redistribution Process | Politics https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/lawyers-urge-indiana-lawmakers-not-to-rush-redistribution-process-politics/ https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/lawyers-urge-indiana-lawmakers-not-to-rush-redistribution-process-politics/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 00:00:00 +0000 https://milwaukeecountyfirst.com/lawyers-urge-indiana-lawmakers-not-to-rush-redistribution-process-politics/ State Representative Tim Wesco R-Osceola, chairman of the House Elections Committee, confirmed Thursday that his committee was set to approve the House Bill 1581 redistribution plan on Monday, the proposed Senate card will be added to the House parquet legislation on Wednesday, and the measure will be set for a full House vote on September […]]]>

State Representative Tim Wesco R-Osceola, chairman of the House Elections Committee, confirmed Thursday that his committee was set to approve the House Bill 1581 redistribution plan on Monday, the proposed Senate card will be added to the House parquet legislation on Wednesday, and the measure will be set for a full House vote on September 23.

The plan will then go to the Senate for a final vote on October 1. But Wesco explained that the idea is that the House does not have to return, which means the Senate must pass the cards approved by the House without changes to advance them to the governor for final approval.

Leigh Morris, of LaPorte, a member of the Indiana Citizen Redistribution Commission, said the timeline did not meet the goals of a transparent redistribution process that results in maps created in good faith to promote competitive elections. .

He and several others urged the committee to take a break for a few weeks to also examine the maps drawn by the citizens of the commission that encourage voter participation by promoting a better balance of power among Indiana’s political parties, as well. than to give Hoosiers more time to fully understand how the state’s legislative districts are changing.

Rima Shahid, executive director of Women4Change, said the Hoosiers especially deserve to know that the cards they get are as gerrymandered in favor of Republicans as the cards used in the past 10 years, according to an analysis by Christopher Warshaw, professor. associate of political science at George Washington University.


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